quarta-feira, fevereiro 20, 2008

Unraveling the East Timor Assassination Story: Republic's rebel with friends in high places

Japan Focus
20.02.2008

Bob Boughton

Introduction.
All is not as it appears in Dili, that “pestilential place,” as described early last century by Joseph Conrad in his classic novel, Victory. The question posed by Bob Broughton is certainly valid, namely, how did one man – Alfredo Reinado – hold hostage the fortunes of this young nation? The answer is certainly murkier than the standard democratic elections narrative which, remarkably, saw in 2007 a constitutional crisis leading to the reversal of roles of the President and Prime Minister in East Timor. As Boughton highlights, it is important to pay attention to personalities and politics.

The real coup in Dili was undoubtedly the 2006 removal of power of Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri, which reversed Fretilin’s fortunes.

Undoubtedly, too, the defection from Fretilin of the current Deputy Prime Minister Jose Luis Guterres sapped Fretilin support. Founder of a breakaway Mundanca or change group, Guterres actively courted a bloc of political parties, Partido Democratico (PD) included, with the stated ambition of driving Alkatiri’s “Maputo-group” from power. PD leader, Fernando “Lasama” de Araujo, a former cell mate of Xanana Gusmao in Cipinang prison in Jakarta and resistance activist, was a key ally in delivering the youth vote, especially among those educated in Indonesian language.

Once the reality set in that the Alkatiri Fretilin government was about playing hardball with the Australians on the Timor Sea Agreement on dividing up oil revenues, and declined to go down the road of debtor state by accepting international loans, it appears that certain international actors began to actively court an acceptable counter-elite to replace both Alkatiri and Fretilin. But the conspiracy ran deeper than that in consideration of the murky role of the Australian media, the Catholic church, the actions of Dili’s bad boy gangs and the malicious yet effective whisper campaigns that, incongruously, tarred Fretilin with the communist brush. To be sure, Fretilin made mistakes. Arming a militia or guard was one, and blindly following World Bank leads on agriculture was probably another. But in sacking the army rebels, the Fretilin government was also heeding United Nation’s advice.

We need not ascribe such agency to Reinado, as Boughton suggests, to believe that the man possessed some dark secrets as to pacts and pardons entered into by the current President and Prime Minister, respectively, perhaps as recently as one month before the assassination and his death in the shootout that followed. But, as a rogue, he was obviously a dangerous card to play.


Japan Focus commentator.

The mayhem in Dili on February 4, in which rebel soldier Alfredo Reinado was shot dead and East Timor's President Jose Ramos Horta badly injured, raises a fundamental question: How was Reinado, a minor military figure, allowed to become and remain such a dangerous force in Timorese politics?

As a frequent visitor to East Timor since 2004 for periods ranging from a few weeks to three months, the more I learn about the internal politics of this fractured country, the more dismayed I become at the failure of many commentators, including UN observers and the International Crisis Group, to analyse the underlying politics behind the violence.

At the heart of the conflict is a political struggle. At stake is the kind of economy and society the country will become.

Reinado was an actor in this struggle, but he did not act alone. When he and his heavily armed group deserted from the army in May 2006, he was taking part in a co-ordinated movement whose aim was to overthrow the democratically elected Fretilin government of Mari Alkatiri, and set the country on a different development path from the one Fretilin had marked out.

Reinado's rebellion was supported by others who sought the same end, including the second largest political party at that time, Partido Democratico, former supporters of integration with Indonesia - some of whom had been members of the Indonesian-backed militias in 1999 - disaffected veterans of the anti-Indonesian resistance, and elements of the Catholic Church.

Despite two attacks by Reinado's group on the loyalist army in May 2006, in which 10 people died, he retained the support of PD. Others who were convinced of Fretilin's illegitimacy lent their weight to the myth that Reinado was some kind of misunderstood folk hero, articulating the aspirations of a people downtrodden by a cruel, Marxist government. They included sections of the Australian media, the academic and international aid community, and Kirsty Sword-Gusmao, the Australian wife of then president Xanana Gusmao.

When Gusmao and Ramos Horta forced Alkatiri to resign in June 2006, Ramos Horta became prime minister and Fretilin lost control of the security and defence apparatus, though it continued to participate in government.

Despite the recommendation of UN investigators that Reinado be apprehended and charged with multiple counts of murder, Ramos Horta and Gusmao sought to block the arrest of Reinado, because they needed PD's votes in order to wrest power completely from Fretilin in the 2007 elections, and PD needed Reinado, since both drew support from the same population base west of Dili.

Reinado was not the only armed rebel who continued to enjoy impunity. Vicente Railos, whose allegations on the ABC's Four Corners helped bring down Alkatiri - allegations ultimately withdrawn by the Gusmao-appointed prosecutor for lack of evidence - had joined Reinado in attacking the army headquarters.

Railos became an organiser for CNRT, the party Gusmao formed to contest the elections. Paulo Martins, the disgraced police commander who also took part in the rebellion was given a place on the CNRT ticket.

Under the guise of engaging in "dialogue" with these dangerous anti-democratic forces, Gusmao and Ramos Horta refused to move against them, in order to cement the votes they needed - first for Horta to win the presidency, and then for Gusmao's party to form an alliance including PD to take government.

When Alkatiri's government was overthrown by an armed rebellion, much of the international community portrayed this as a successful people's power revolution. When the votes of PD, Reinado's closest political ally, helped secure Ramos Horta and Gusmao an electoral victory over Fretilin, many foreign commentators celebrated this as a victory for multi-party democracy.

The hollowness of that democracy was exposed for all to see last Monday, in a classic case of blowback.

In the days leading up to Reinado's final move, his old supporters and defenders, including PD's leader Fernando Lasama - now acting President in Ramos Horta's stead - Prime Minister Gusmao and President Horta were considering a proposal which Fretilin had helped draft to solve the army "petitioners" problem, the initial pretext for the 2006 rebellion.

This may well have brought an end to the insecurity that forces thousands to struggle to exist in refugee camps. But the deal required that Reinado would be brought to justice and early parliamentary elections held.

For almost two years, the Australian public has been told that Fretilin's removal was a victory for democracy, when really it was achieved through violence and a corrupt, unconstitutional and anti-democratic political movement. Reinado became a central player in that movement, but he only survived because of his powerful political backers.

Arrest warrants have been issued for those believed to have taken part in Monday's attacks. In fact, the net should be cast much wider. All who supported Reinado now have a case to answer.


Bob Boughton is a senior lecturer at the school of education, University of New England. He is an Australian Research Council fellow working with East Timor's Ministry of Education to develop an adult education system and a national literacy campaign.

This article appeared in The Australian, February 16, 2008.


Tradução:

Desmorona-se a história de assassínio em Timor-Leste: Amotinado da República com amigos em altas posições

Japan Focus20.02.2008
Bob Boughton

Introdução. Nem tudo é como parece em Dili, aquele “lugar pestilento,” como descreveu no princípio do século passado Joseph Conrad na sua clássica novela, Victory. A questão colocada por Bob Broughton tem de certeza toda a validade, nomeadamente, como é que um homem– Alfredo Reinado – manteve refém o destino desta jovem nação? A resposta é com certeza mais lamacenta do que narrativa padrão das eleições democráticas que, extraordinariamente, viu em 2007 uma crise constitucional levar a troca de cargos do Presidente e Primeiro-Ministro em Timor-Lester. Como Boughton sublinha é importante dar atenção a personalidades e políticas.

O golpe real em Dili foi sem margem de dúvida a remoção do poder em 2006 do Primeiro-Ministro Mari Alkatiri, que mudou o destino da Fretilin.

Sem dúvida, também, a deserção da Fretilin do corrente Vice-Primeiro-Ministro José Luis Guterres sapou o apoio da Fretilin. Fundador do grupo de ruptura Mudanca ou mudança, Guterres cortejou activamente um bloco de partidos políticos, Partido Democrático (PD) incluído, com a afirmada ambição de tirar do poder o “grupo Maputo” de Alkatiri. O líder do PD, Fernando “Lasama” de Araújo ,um antigo colega de cela de Xanana Gusmão na prisão de Cipinang em Jacarta e activista da resistência, foi um aliado chave na obtenção do voto da juventude, especialmente entre os educados na língua Indonésia.

Logo que a realidade mostrou que o governo Alkatiri da Fretilin ia jogar duro com os Australianos no acordo do Mar de Timor na divisão dos rendimentos do petróleo, e que declinava entrar na via de Estado devedor aceitando empréstimos internacionais, parece que certos actores internacionais começaram a cortejar activamente uma contra-elite aceitável para substituir ambos Alkatiri e a Fretilin. Mas a conspiração foi mais profunda do que isso considerando o papel lamacento dos media Australianos, igreja Católica, as acções dos gangues dos rapazes maus de Dili e as campanhas mal intencionadas contudo eficazes de rumores que, erradamente, pintaram a Fretilin com o pincel comunista. Certamente que a Fretilin cometeu erros. Armar uma milícia ou guardas foi um, e seguir cegamente as opiniões do Banco Mundial na agricultura foi provavelmente outro. Mas ao despedir os amotinados das forças armadas, o governo da Fretilin estava a seguir um conselho das Nações Unidas.
Precisamos de relacionar tal acção com Reinado, como Boughton sugere, para acreditar que o homem tinha alguns segredos negros dado que entrou em pactos e perdões com o corrente Presidente e Primeiro-Ministro, respectivamente, tão recentemente quanto um mês antes do assassínio e da sua morte no tiroteio que se seguiu. Mas, sendo um pária, era obviamente um cartão perigoso para jogar.


Japan Focus comentador.

A confusão em Dili em 11 de Fevereiro, na qual o soldado amotinado Alfredo Reinado foi morto a tiro e o Presidente de Timor-Leste José Ramos Horta gravemente ferido, levanta uma questão fundamental: Como é que Reinado, uma figura menor das forças militares, foi autorizado a tornar-se e a permanecer uma força tão perigosa na política Timorense?

Como visitante frequente de Timor-Leste desde 2004 por períodos que vão de poucas semanas a três meses, quanto mais aprendo acerca das políticas internas deste país dividido, mais espantado fico com o falhanço de muitos comentadores, incluindo observadores da ONU e o International Crisis Group, em analisar as polícias subjacentes por detrás da violência.
No centro do conflito está uma luta política. Em causa está o tipo de economia e de sociedade em que o país se tornará.

Reinado foi um actor nesta luta, mas não actuou sozinho. Quando ele e o seu grupo fortemente armado desertaram das forças armadas em Maio de 2006, ele participava num movimento co-ordenado cujo objectivo era derrubar o governo eleito democraticamente da Fretilin de Mari Alkatiri, e pôr o país num caminho diferente para o desenvolvimento daquele que a Fretilin tinha marcado.

O motim de Reinado foi apoiado por outros que procuravam o mesmo fim, incluindo o segundo maior partido político nessa altura, o Partido Democrático, antigos apoiantes da integração com a Indonésia – alguns dos quais tinham sido membros das milícias apoiadas pela Indonésia em 1999 – veteranos dissidentes da resistência anti-Indonésia e elementos da Igreja Católica.

Apesar dos dois ataques pelo grupo de Reinado às forças armadas leais em Maio de 2006, no qual morreram 10 pessoas, ele manteve o apoio do PD. Outros que foram convencidos pela ilegitimidade da Fretilin emprestaram o seu peso ao mito que Reinado era um tipo de herói folclórico incompreendido, articulando as aspirações dum povo subjugado por um governo cruel, Marxista. Eles incluem secções dos media Australianos, a comunidade académica e da ajuda internacional, e Kirsty Sword-Gusmão, a mulher Australiana do então presidente Xanana Gusmão.

Quando Gusmão e Ramos Horta forçaram Alkatiri a resignar em Junho 2006, Ramos Horta tornou-se primeiro-ministro e a Fretilin perdeu o controlo do aparelho da segurança e da defesa, apesar de continuar a participar no governo.

Apesar das recomendações de investigadores da ONU que Reinado fosse capturado e acusado com múltiplos casos de homicídio, Ramos Horta e Gusmão tentaram bloquear a prisão de Reinado, porque precisavam dos votos do PD de modo a afastarem completamente do poder a Fretilin nas eleições de 2007 e o PD precisava de Reinado, dado que ambos recolhiam o apoio da mesma base da população a oeste de Dili.

Reinado não foi o único amotinado armado que continuou a gozar de impunidade. Vicente Railos, cujas alegações no Four Corners da ABC ajudaram a derrubar Alkatiri – alegações que acabaram por ser retiradas pelo procurador nomeado por Gusmão por falta de evidência – tinha-se juntado a Reinado no ataque ao quartel das forças armadas.

Railos tornou-se um organizador para o CNRT, o partido que Gusmão formou para concorrer às eleições. Paulo Martins, o comandante da polícia que caiu em desgraça e que também tomou parte no motim e foi-lhe dado um lugar (no parlamento) pelo CNRT.

Sob o disfarce de engajar em"diálogo" com estas forças perigosas anti-democráticas, Gusmão e Ramos Horta recusaram actuar contra eles, de modo a cimentarem os votos de que precisavam - primeiro para Horta ganhar a presidência e depois para o partido de Gusmão formar uma aliança incluindo o PD para assaltar o governo.

Quando o governo de Alkatiri foi derrubado por um motim armado, muita da comunidade internacional relatou isto como uma revolução de poder do povo com sucesso. Quando os votos do PD, o mais próximo aliado político de Reinado, ajudaram a dar a Ramos Horta e a Gusmão uma vitória eleitoral sobre a Fretilin, muitos comentadores estrangeiros celebraram isso como uma vitória para a democracia multi-partidária.

A vacuidade dessa democracia ficou exposta para todos verem na Segunda-feira passada num caso clássico de contra-golpe.

Nos dias antes do último movimento de Reinado, os seus antigos apoiantes e defensores, incluindo o líder do PD Fernando Lasama – agora Presidente interino no lugar de Ramos Horta - Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão e Presidente Horta estavam a considerar uma proposta que a Fretilin tinha ajudado a elaborar para resolver o problema dos “peticionários” das forças armadas, o pretexto inicial para o motim de 2006.

Isto podia acabar com a insegurança que força milhares a lutar pela existência em campos de deslocados. Mas o acordo exigiu que Reinado seria levado à justiça e a realização de eleições parlamentares antecipadas.

Durante quase dois anos, tem sido contado à população Australiana que a remoção da Fretilin era uma vitória da democracia, quando realmente foi conseguida através da violência e dum movimento político corrupto, inconstitucional e anti-democrático. Reinado tornou-se um actor central nesse movimento, mas apenas sobreviveu por causa dos seus poderosos apoiantes políticos.

Mandatos de captura têm sido emitidos para os que se acreditam terem participado nos ataques de Segunda-feira. De facto, a rede devia ser lançada muito mais longe. Todos os que apoiaram Reinado têm agora um caso para responder .

Bob Boughton é um académico de topo na escola de educação, Universidade de New England. É membro do Conselho de Investigação Australiano trabalhando com o Ministério da Educação de Timor-Leste para desenvolver um sistema de educação para adultos e uma campanha nacional de alfabetização.Este artigo apareceu no Australian, de 16 de Fevereiro, 2008.

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:

Desmorona-se a história de assassínio em Timor-Leste: Amotinado da República com amigos em altas posições
Japan Focus
20.02.2008

Bob Boughton

Introdução.
Nem tudo é como parece em Dili, aquele “lugar pestilento,” como descreveu no princípio do século passado Joseph Conrad na sua clássica novela, Victory. A questão colocada por Bob Broughton tem de certeza toda a validade, nomeadamente, como é que um homem– Alfredo Reinado – manteve refém o destino desta jovem nação? A resposta é com certeza mais lamacenta do que narrativa padrão das eleições democráticas que, extraordinariamente, viu em 2007 uma crise constitucional levar a troca de cargos do Presidente e Primeiro-Ministro em Timor-Lester. Como Boughton sublinha é importante dar atenção a personalidades e políticas.

O golpe real em Dili foi sem margem de dúvida a remoção do poder em 2006 do Primeiro-Ministro Mari Alkatiri, que mudou o destino da Fretilin.

Sem dúvida, também, a deserção da Fretilin do corrente Vice-Primeiro-Ministro José Luis Guterres sapou o apoio da Fretilin. Fundador do grupo de ruptura Mudanca ou mudança, Guterres cortejou activamente um bloco de partidos políticos, Partido Democrático (PD) incluído, com a afirmada ambição de tirar do poder o “grupo Maputo” de Alkatiri. O líder do PD, Fernando “Lasama” de Araújo ,um antigo colega de cela de Xanana Gusmão na prisão de Cipinang em Jacarta e activista da resistência, foi um aliado chave na obtenção do voto da juventude, especialmente entre os educados na língua Indonésia.

Logo que a realidade mostrou que o governo Alkatiri da Fretilin ia jogar duro com os Australianos no acordo do Mar de Timor na divisão dos rendimentos do petróleo, e que declinava entrar na via de Estado devedor aceitando empréstimos internacionais, parece que certos actores internacionais começaram a cortejar activamente uma contra-elite aceitável para substituir ambos Alkatiri e a Fretilin. Mas a conspiração foi mais profunda do que isso considerando o papel lamacento dos media Australianos, igreja Católica, as acções dos gangues dos rapazes maus de Dili e as campanhas mal intencionadas contudo eficazes de rumores que, erradamente, pintaram a Fretilin com o pincel comunista. Certamente que a Fretilin cometeu erros. Armar uma milícia ou guardas foi um, e seguir cegamente as opiniões do Banco Mundial na agricultura foi provavelmente outro. Mas ao despedir os amotinados das forças armadas, o governo da Fretilin estava a seguir um conselho das Nações Unidas.

Precisamos de relacionar tal acção com Reinado, como Boughton sugere, para acreditar que o homem tinha alguns segredos negros dado que entrou em pactos e perdões com o corrente Presidente e Primeiro-Ministro, respectivamente, tão recentemente quanto um mês antes do assassínio e da sua morte no tiroteio que se seguiu. Mas, sendo um pária, era obviamente um cartão perigoso para jogar.

Japan Focus comentador.

A confusão em Dili em 11 de Fevereiro, na qual o soldado amotinado Alfredo Reinado foi morto a tiro e o Presidente de Timor-Leste José Ramos Horta gravemente ferido, levanta uma questão fundamental: Como é que Reinado, uma figura menor das forças militares, foi autorizado a tornar-se e a permanecer uma força tão perigosa na política Timorense?

Como visitante frequente de Timor-Leste desde 2004 por períodos que vão de poucas semanas a três meses, quanto mais aprendo acerca das políticas internas deste país dividido, mais espantado fico com o falhanço de muitos comentadores, incluindo observadores da ONU e o International Crisis Group, em analisar as polícias subjacentes por detrás da violência.

No centro do conflito está uma luta política. Em causa está o tipo de economia e de sociedade em que o país se tornará.

Reinado foi um actor nesta luta, mas não actuou sozinho. Quando ele e o seu grupo fortemente armado desertaram das forças armadas em Maio de 2006, ele participava num movimento co-ordenado cujo objectivo era derrubar o governo eleito democraticamente da Fretilin de Mari Alkatiri, e pôr o país num caminho diferente para o desenvolvimento daquele que a Fretilin tinha marcado.


O motim de Reinado foi apoiado por outros que procuravam o mesmo fim, incluindo o segundo maior partido político nessa altura, o Partido Democrático, antigos apoiantes da integração com a Indonésia – alguns dos quais tinham sido membros das milícias apoiadas pela Indonésia em 1999 – veteranos dissidentes da resistência anti-Indonésia e elementos da Igreja Católica.

Apesar dos dois ataques pelo grupo de Reinado às forças armadas leais em Maio de 2006, no qual morreram 10 pessoas, ele manteve o apoio do PD. Outros que foram convencidos pela ilegitimidade da Fretilin emprestaram o seu peso ao mito que Reinado era um tipo de herói folclórico incompreendido, articulando as aspirações dum povo subjugado por um governo cruel, Marxista. Eles incluem secções dos media Australianos, a comunidade académica e da ajuda internacional, e Kirsty Sword-Gusmão, a mulher Australiana do então presidente Xanana Gusmão.

Quando Gusmão e Ramos Horta forçaram Alkatiri a resignar em Junho 2006, Ramos Horta tornou-se primeiro-ministro e a Fretilin perdeu o controlo do aparelho da segurança e da defesa, apesar de continuar a participar no governo.

Apesar das recomendações de investigadores da ONU que Reinado fosse capturado e acusado com múltiplos casos de homicídio, Ramos Horta e Gusmão tentaram bloquear a prisão de Reinado, porque precisavam dos votos do PD de modo a afastarem completamente do poder a Fretilin nas eleições de 2007 e o PD precisava de Reinado, dado que ambos recolhiam o apoio da mesma base da população a oeste de Dili.

Reinado não foi o único amotinado armado que continuou a gozar de impunidade. Vicente Railos, cujas alegações no Four Corners da ABC ajudaram a derrubar Alkatiri – alegações que acabaram por ser retiradas pelo procurador nomeado por Gusmão por falta de evidência – tinha-se juntado a Reinado no ataque ao quartel das forças armadas.

Railos tornou-se um organizador para o CNRT, o partido que Gusmão formou para concorrer às eleições. Paulo Martins, o comandante da polícia que caiu em desgraça e que também tomou parte no motim e foi-lhe dado um lugar (no parlamento) pelo CNRT.

Sob o disfarce de engajar em"diálogo" com estas forças perigosas anti-democráticas, Gusmão e Ramos Horta recusaram actuar contra eles, de modo a cimentarem os votos de que precisavam - primeiro para Horta ganhar a presidência e depois para o partido de Gusmão formar uma aliança incluindo o PD para assaltar o governo.

Quando o governo de Alkatiri foi derrubado por um motim armado, muita da comunidade internacional relatou isto como uma revolução de poder do povo com sucesso. Quando os votos do PD, o mais próximo aliado político de Reinado, ajudaram a dar a Ramos Horta e a Gusmão uma vitória eleitoral sobre a Fretilin, muitos comentadores estrangeiros celebraram isso como uma vitória para a democracia multi-partidária.

A vacuidade dessa democracia ficou exposta para todos verem na Segunda-feira passada num caso clássico de contra-golpe.

Nos dias antes do último movimento de Reinado, os seus antigos apoiantes e defensores, incluindo o líder do PD Fernando Lasama – agora Presidente interino no lugar de Ramos Horta - Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão e Presidente Horta estavam a considerar uma proposta que a Fretilin tinha ajudado a elaborar para resolver o problema dos “peticionários” das forças armadas, o pretexto inicial para o motim de 2006.

Isto podia acabar com a insegurança que força milhares a lutar pela existência em campos de deslocados. Mas o acordo exigiu que Reinado seria levado à justiça e a realização de eleições parlamentares antecipadas.

Durante quase dois anos, tem sido contado à população Australiana que a remoção da Fretilin era uma vitória da democracia, quando realmente foi conseguida através da violência e dum movimento político corrupto, inconstitucional e anti-democrático. Reinado tornou-se um actor central nesse movimento, mas apenas sobreviveu por causa dos seus poderosos apoiantes políticos.

Mandatos de captura têm sido emitidos para os que se acreditam terem participado nos ataques de Segunda-feira. De facto, a rede devia ser lançada muito mais longe. Todos os que apoiaram Reinado têm agora um caso para responder .

Bob Boughton é um académico de topo na escola de educação, Universidade de New England. É membro do Conselho de Investigação Australiano trabalhando com o Ministério da Educação de Timor-Leste para desenvolver um sistema de educação para adultos e uma campanha nacional de alfabetização.
Este artigo apareceu no Australian, de 16 de Fevereiro, 2008.

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.