quarta-feira, fevereiro 20, 2008

East Timor's Crisis The Strangest Yet

MR Zine
19/02/08
by Tom O'Lincoln

East Timor's latest crisis is the strangest yet. The shoot-out that left president Jose Ramos Horta in intensive care, and killed the charismatic rebel Major Alfredo Reinado, is still unexplained.

At first they told us it was a coup attempt by Reinado's forces, disaffected ex-soldiers who had come from their hiding places in the hills to besiege Horta's house and later to shoot up Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao's car. Supposedly this was after a meeting between the President and the Major which had "ended acrimoniously."

Then it emerged that Reinado had died first: "neighbours and Ramos Horta's house staff told The Australian that Reinado did not fire the first shot. Instead, they said he had appeared at the gate asking for the President and was almost immediately shot through the eye."

Next Ramos Horta's brother-in-law, Joao Carrascalao, claimed that both the President and the Major were set up, seemingly by sections of the army. Carrascalao says someone shot the President in the back as he walked up a hill towards Reinado's guys. Meanwhile economic Minister Joao Goncalves reveals that the meeting between Horta and Reinado was a big success, and an amnesty deal was on the way for both the Major and his followers. So why should the rebels attack?

Ramos Horta may or may not recover enough to resume governing. Reinado is gone, but his cult following among sections of the population west of Dili is enhanced, at least for now. The rebels are still at large, and the Australians have taken a huge hit to their prestige by allowing this all to happen under their noses.

30,000 people are still living in camps following the violence of 2006, as flooding and a locust plague make life a misery. Agencies talk of "donor fatigue" as East Timor's heroic image fades, and the UN is about to cut rations to camp dwellers. The government has a plan to help internal refugees return home, but confused property laws get in the way.

You'd expect talk of action to meet people's needs, but the new Australian Labor government's response echoed its right-wing predecessor's -- boots on the ground. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd had criticised the Howard regime for relying on military solutions, but he quickly sent fresh armed forces to Timor, bringing the total to just under a thousand, making up the bulk of the so-called International Stabilisation Force. These include SAS commandos who botched an attempt to capture Reinado despite having Blackhawk helicopters and "every form of modern gadgetry."

They faced savage criticism after the shoot-outs. "There is no need to send more troops," said Opposition leader Mari Alkatiri. "There are already enough troops here if they do their jobs." East Timor's military chief, Brigadier-General Taur Matan Ruak, was "staggered" Reinado's forces could reach Horta's house with the Australians unaware.

The situation is fraught. There is a symbiotic relationship between the Horta-Gusmao government which scraped into office last year and the Australian (and New Zealand) presence. The government is effectively propped up by foreign troops, while Australian plans to stabilize the country have relied on Gusmao's personal prestige and the political skills of Ramos Horta. Now the troops are a laughing stock. Horta is seriously wounded, Gusmao's version of events seems discredited and a sullen former governing party, Fretilin, bides its time in the fragmented parliament. All Canberra's plans could unravel.

Australian strategists are asking nervous questions about Rudd's long-term game plan and the East Timor government's economic strategy.

As the Australian newspaper's hard-boiled commentator Greg Sheridan notes, the fall-out from these events could intersect with turmoil in other parts of the "Melanesian world" -- a point Rudd made during the election. That is the ethnically related island states running eastward from Timor as far as Fiji. Sheridan wants Australia to dig in for the duration and call the shots more aggressively. "Australia is a separate and powerful force in East Timor's politics and the quicker it recognises this, the better. Canberra never should have allowed East Timor to develop both an army and a police force, for example." And he says the current crisis "underlines the need for a bigger Australian army."

But that army is less and less popular in East Timor. The week before Ramos Horta was attacked, his son Loro wrote that the Aussies were "outstaying their welcome," citing a series of outrages, for example the October 2006 incident when the ADF established checkpoints around the East Timor army's headquarters. "Taur Matan Ruak was prevented at gun point from leaving his own headquarters" until he was searched, leaving a sour taste from this "humiliation at the hands of a teenage Australian corporal."

One reason the "Stabilisation Force" falls on its face is a lack of roots in local society. Reinado escaped its clutches because he had a source close to the Australians. Yet it seems no one will tell the Aussies anything.

At first glance it seems the government should be able to put an economic plan together. After all there are oil and gas revenues, with over a billion dollars in a special fund in New York. Horta and Gusmao went to last year's elections promising to tap these funds but have done little about it. This is partly because their strategy looks to a neo-liberal de-regulatory regime with minimal taxes on business and maximum reliance on the entrepreneurial spirit. Even if that didn't risk most resources ending up in the hands of rapacious capitalists, the reality is that entrepreneurs will run a mile before investing in the security nightmare that is East Timor today.

After the failed raid on Reinado, crowds barricaded streets in Dili, burned tires and chanted "Australians go home!" Anger sparked again when troops attacked a refugee camp near the airport on 23 February using tanks, tear gas, and bullets and allegedly killing two people. But it takes a more coherent social force to challenge imperialist troops. The most likely candidate is Fretilin, but this party seems more anxious to regain parliamentary control than build a wider social movement.

There's another cloud on the horizon for Kevin Rudd, however: other outside forces like to meddle. Portugal is angling to recover some of its former clout. China's well known diplomatic strategy is building mega-structures to flatter the government, including the new Foreign Ministry building which according to one magazine is "the biggest building in the land -- obscenely large -- many times the size of Dili Hospital." They hope for influence in return.

Perhaps most startling is the re-emergence of Indonesia. Yanto Soegiarto, a journalist close to the Indonesian military, offers a solution to East Timor's troubles. "Give the Indonesian military a chance to restore security and stability in Timor and the situation will improve. . . . Indonesia and East Timor are now in a brotherly relationship. The Timorese will see Indonesian troops more as their new brother compared to the Western-style, heavily-armed white soldiers who always try to look superior."

This isn't quite as far-fetched as it seems, given cheering crowds greeted Indonesian President Yudhoyono when he visited in 2005. The Jakarta government, still closely linked to the military, is not happy with the sight of a thousand Australian troops on its doorstep and will look hard for ways to regain leverage in East Timor.

Tom O'Lincoln has has been active on the left since 1967, in the German SDS, at UC Berkeley, and for many years in Melbourne Australia. He's the author or editor of five books on Australian history and politics (Into the Mainstream: The Decline of Australian Communism; Years of Rage: Social Conflicts in the Fraser Era; United We Stand: Class Struggle in Colonial Australia; Class and Class Conflict in Australia; and Rebel Women in Australian Working Class History), and maintains the Marxist Interventions website: www.anu.edu.au/polsci/marx/interventions/. Tom is a member of Socialist Alternative.



Tradução:

A mais estranha crise de todas de Timor-Leste

MR Zine
19/02/08
Por Tom O'Lincoln

A última crise de Timor-Leste é a mais estranha de todas. O tiroteio que deixou o presidente José Ramos Horta nos cuidados intensivos e matou o carismático amotinado Major Alfredo Reinado, não está ainda explicado.

Primeiro disseram-nos que era uma tentativa de golpe pelas forças de Reinado, ex-soldados dissidentes que tinham vindo dos seus esconderijos nas montanhas para cercar a casa de Horta e depois para balearem o carro do Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão. Supostamente isto acontecera depois dum encontro entre o Presidente e o Major que tinha “acabado azedamente”.

Depois emergiu que Reinado morreu primeiro: "vizinhos e pessoal da casa de Ramos Horta disseram ao Australian que não foi Reinado quem disparou o primeiro tiro. Pelo contrário, disseram que ele apareceu ao portão a perguntar pelo Presidente e que foi quase imediatamente baleado num olho."

A seguir o cunhado de Ramos Horta, João Carrascalão, afirmou que ambos o Presidente e o Major tinham sido tramados, parece que por secções das forças armadas. Carrascalão diz que alguém baleou o Presidente pelas costas quando ele subiu um monte a pé em direcção aos homens de Reinado. Entretanto o Ministro da Economia João Gonçalves revela que o encontro entre Horta e Reinado fora um grande sucesso, e que estava a caminho um acordo de amnistia para ambos o Major e os seus seguidores. Então porque é que os amotinados iam atacar?

Ramos Horta pode recuperar ou não o suficiente para retomar as funções. Reinado foi-se, mas, pelo menos por agora, reforçou-se o seu culto entre sectores da população a oeste de Dili. Os amotinados continuam ao largo, e os Australianos levaram um enorme golpe no seu prestígio ao terem permitido que tudo isto acontecesse mesmo debaixo dos seus narizes.

30,000 pessoas continuam a viver em campos depois da violência de 2006, enquanto as inundações e uma praga de gafanhotos torna a vida miserável. Agências falam de "fadiga de dadores" enquanto a imagem heróica de Timor-Leste se dilui e a ONU se apresta a cortar rações aos habitantes dos campos. O governo tem um plano para ajudar os deslocados a regressarem a casa, mas leis de propriedade confusas atrapalham o caminho.

Podia-se esperar conversa de acção para responder às necessidades das pessoas, mas a resposta do novo governo Australiano do Labor ecoa a do seu predecessor da ala direita -- botas no terreno. O Primeiro-Ministro Kevin Rudd tinha criticado o regime de Howard por se apoiar em soluções militares, mas mandou rapidamente novas forças armadas para Timor, elevando o total para cerca de um milhar, fazendo o grosso da chamada Força Internacional de Estabilização. Estes incluem comandos SAS que falharam uma tentativa para capturar Reinado apesar de terem helicópteros Blackhawk e "todo o tipo de aparelhagem moderna."

Eles enfrentaram críticas ferozes depois do tiroteio. "Não há nenhuma necessidade de enviarem mais tropas," disse o líder da Oposição Mari Alkatiri. "Já têm tropas suficientes aqui para fazerem o trabalho." disse o chefe das forças militares de Timor-Leste, Brigadeiro-General Taur Matan Ruak, que estava "chocado" por as forças de Reinado poderem ter alcançado a casa de Horta no desconhecimento dos Australianos.

A situação está carregada. Há uma relação simbiótica entre o governo Horta-Gusmão que conseguiram o cargo com muita dificuldade o ano passado e a presença Australiana (e da Nova Zelândia). O governo está efectivamente escorado por tropas estrangeiras, ao mesmo tempo que os planos Australianos para estabilizar o país assentaram no prestígio pessoal de Gusmão e nas capacidades políticas de Ramos Horta. Agora as tropas são um motivo de risota. Horta está ferido com gravidade, a versão dos eventos de Gusmão parece desacreditada e um chateado antigo partido do governo, a Fretilin, aguarda a sua vez no fragmentado parlamento. Todos os planos de Canberra podem-se desconjunturar.

Os estrategas Australianos estão a fazer perguntas nervosas acerca do plano de jogo a longo prazo de Rudd e da estratégia económica do governo de Timor-Leste.

Como o poderoso comentador do jornal Australian Greg Sheridan realça, o espalhar destes eventos pode cruzar-se com tumultos noutras partes do "mundo da Melanésia" -- um ponto que Rudd fez durante a eleição. Isso é as ilhas Estados etnicamente relacionadas que correm desde o leste de Timor até às Fiji. Sheridan quer que a Austrália comece com energia para durar e actue com mais agressividade. "A Austrália é uma força separada e poderosa na política de Timor-Leste e quanto mais depressa reconhecer isso, melhor. A Canberra nunca devia ter autorizado que Timor-Leste tivesse desenvolvido ambas uma força armada e uma polícia, por exemplo." E diz que a crise corrente "sublinha a necessidade dumas forças armadas Australianas maiores."

Mas essas forças armadas cada vez são menos populares em Timor-Leste. Na semana antes de Ramos Horta ter sido atacado, o seu filho Loro escreveu que os Australianos estavam "a abusar da hospitalidade," citando uma série de ultrajes, por exemplo o incidente de Outubro de 2006 quando a ADF estabeleceu postos de controlo à volta do quartel das forças armadas de Timor-Leste. "Taur Matan Ruak foi prevenido sob armas apontadas de sair do seu próprio quartel" até ter sido revistado, o que deixou um trave amargo desta "humilhação às mãos dum soldado adolescente Australiano."

Uma das razões porque a "Força de Estabilização" se estampou ao comprido é por falta de raízes na sociedade local. Reinado escapou ao seu poder porque tinha uma fonte próxima dos Australianos. Contudo parece que ninguém contará nada aos Australianos.

À primeira vista parece que o governo devia ser capaz de fazer um plano económico. No fim de contas há os rendimentos do petróleo e do gás, com mais de um bilião de dólares num fundo especial em Nova Iorque. Horta e Gusmão foram para as eleições do ano passado a prometerem canalisar esses fundos mas pouco fizeram sobre isso. Isto acontece em parte porque a estratégia deles parece ser a de um regime neo-liberal de desregulamentar com impostos mínimos para os negócios e a máxima confiança no espírito empresarial. Mesmo se isso não pusesse em risco de acabar nas mãos de capitalistas predadores a maioria dos recursos, a realidade é que os empresários não arriscam nada no pesadelo de segurança que Timor-Leste é hoje.

Depois do assalto falhado contra Reinado, multidões fizeram barricadas nas ruas de Dili, queimaram pneus e gritaram "Australianos vão-se embora!" A raiva explodiu outra vez quando as tropas atacaram um campo de deslocados perto do aeroporto em 23 de Fevereiro, usando tanques, gás lacrimogénio e balas e mataram duas pessoas. Mas é preciso uma força social mais coerente para desafiar tropas imperialistas. O candidato mais provável é a Fretilin, mas este partido parece mais ansioso para reganhar o controlo parlamentar do que para construir um movimento social mais amplo.

Há uma outro golpe no horizonte para Kevin Rudd, contudo: outras forças do exterior que gostam de se intrometer. Portugal eatá a tentar recuperar algum do seu antigo poder. A bem conhecida estratégica diplomática de China está a construir mega-estruturas para bajular o governo, incluindo o novo edifício do Ministério dos Estrangeiros que de acordo com uma revista é "o maior edifício do país – obscenamente grande – muitas vezes o tamanho do Hospital de Dili Hospital." Eles têm esperança de influência no retorno.

Talvez o mais surpreendente é a re-emergência da Indonésia. Yanto Soegiarto, um jornalista próximo dos militares Indonésios, oferece uma solução para os problemas de Timor-Leste. "Dêem aos militares Indonésios uma oportunidade para restaurar a segurança e a estabilidade em Timor e a situação melhorará. . . . a Indonésia e Timor-Leste têm agora uma relação fraternal. Os Timorenses verão as tropas Indonésias mais como os seus novos irmãos comparados com o estilo Ocidental, dos soldados brancos pesadamente armados que tentam sempre parecer superiores."

Isto não é tão absurdo quanto parece, dadas as multidões que aplaudiam o Presidente Indonésio Yudhoyono quando da sua visita em 2005. O governo de Jacarta, ainda muito intimamente ligados aos militares, não está contente com a visão de um milhar de tropas Australianas ao pé da sua porta e procurará bastante novos caminhos para reganhar peso em Timor-Leste.

Tom O'Lincoln tem sido activo na esquerda desde 1967, no German SDS, na UC Berkeley, e durante muitos anos em Melbourne Australia. É autou ou editor de cinco livros sobre história e políticas Australiana (Into the Mainstream: The Decline of Australian Communism; Years of Rage: Social Conflicts in the Fraser Era; United We Stand: Class Struggle in Colonial Australia; Class and Class Conflict in Australia; e Rebel Women in Australian Working Class History), e mantém o website de intervenções marxistas: www.anu.edu.au/polsci/marx/interventions/. Tom é um membro da Alternativa Socialista.

3 comentários:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
A mais estranha crise de todas de Timor-Leste
MR Zine
19/02/08
Por Tom O'Lincoln

A última crise de Timor-Leste é a mais estranha de todas. O tiroteio que deixou o presidente José Ramos Horta nos cuidados intensivos e matou o carismático amotinado Major Alfredo Reinado, não está ainda explicado.

Primeiro disseram-nos que era uma tentativa de golpe pelas forças de Reinado, ex-soldados dissidentes que tinham vindo dos seus esconderijos nas montanhas para cercar a casa de Horta e depois para balearem o carro do Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão. Supostamente isto acontecera depois dum encontro entre o Presidente e o Major que tinha “acabado azedamente”.

Depois emergiu que Reinado morreu primeiro: "vizinhos e pessoal da casa de Ramos Horta disseram ao Australian que não foi Reinado quem disparou o primeiro tiro. Pelo contrário, disseram que ele apareceu ao portão a perguntar pelo Presidente e que foi quase imediatamente baleado num olho."

A seguir o cunhado de Ramos Horta, João Carrascalão, afirmou que ambos o Presidente e o Major tinham sido tramados, parece que por secções das forças armadas. Carrascalão diz que alguém baleou o Presidente pelas costas quando ele subiu um monte a pé em direcção aos homens de Reinado. Entretanto o Ministro da Economia João Gonçalves revela que o encontro entre Horta e Reinado fora um grande sucesso, e que estava a caminho um acordo de amnistia para ambos o Major e os seus seguidores. Então porque é que os amotinados iam atacar?

Ramos Horta pode recuperar ou não o suficiente para retomar as funções. Reinado foi-se, mas, pelo menos por agora, reforçou-se o seu culto entre sectores da população a oeste de Dili. Os amotinados continuam ao largo, e os Australianos levaram um enorme golpe no seu prestígio ao terem permitido que tudo isto acontecesse mesmo debaixo dos seus narizes.

30,000 pessoas continuam a viver em campos depois da violência de 2006, enquanto as inundações e uma praga de gafanhotos torna a vida miserável. Agências falam de "fadiga de dadores" enquanto a imagem heróica de Timor-Leste se dilui e a ONU se apresta a cortar rações aos habitantes dos campos. O governo tem um plano para ajudar os deslocados a regressarem a casa, mas leis de propriedade confusas atrapalham o caminho.

Podia-se esperar conversa de acção para responder às necessidades das pessoas, mas a resposta do novo governo Australiano do Labor ecoa a do seu predecessor da ala direita -- botas no terreno. O Primeiro-Ministro Kevin Rudd tinha criticado o regime de Howard por se apoiar em soluções militares, mas mandou rapidamente novas forças armadas para Timor, elevando o total para cerca de um milhar, fazendo o grosso da chamada Força Internacional de Estabilização. Estes incluem comandos SAS que falharam uma tentativa para capturar Reinado apesar de terem helicópteros Blackhawk e "todo o tipo de aparelhagem moderna."

Eles enfrentaram críticas ferozes depois do tiroteio. "Não há nenhuma necessidade de enviarem mais tropas," disse o líder da Oposição Mari Alkatiri. "Já têm tropas suficientes aqui para fazerem o trabalho." disse o chefe das forças militares de Timor-Leste, Brigadeiro-General Taur Matan Ruak, que estava "chocado" por as forças de Reinado poderem ter alcançado a casa de Horta no desconhecimento dos Australianos.

A situação está carregada. Há uma relação simbiótica entre o governo Horta-Gusmão que conseguiram o cargo com muita dificuldade o ano passado e a presença Australiana (e da Nova Zelândia). O governo está efectivamente escorado por tropas estrangeiras, ao mesmo tempo que os planos Australianos para estabilizar o país assentaram no prestígio pessoal de Gusmão e nas capacidades políticas de Ramos Horta. Agora as tropas são um motivo de risota. Horta está ferido com gravidade, a versão dos eventos de Gusmão parece desacreditada e um chateado antigo partido do governo, a Fretilin, aguarda a sua vez no fragmentado parlamento. Todos os planos de Canberra podem-se desconjunturar.

Os estrategas Australianos estão a fazer perguntas nervosas acerca do plano de jogo a longo prazo de Rudd e da estratégia económica do governo de Timor-Leste.

Como o poderoso comentador do jornal Australian Greg Sheridan realça, o espalhar destes eventos pode cruzar-se com tumultos noutras partes do "mundo da Melanésia" -- um ponto que Rudd fez durante a eleição. Isso é as ilhas Estados etnicamente relacionadas que correm desde o leste de Timor até às Fiji. Sheridan quer que a Austrália comece com energia para durar e actue com mais agressividade. "A Austrália é uma força separada e poderosa na política de Timor-Leste e quanto mais depressa reconhecer isso, melhor. A Canberra nunca devia ter autorizado que Timor-Leste tivesse desenvolvido ambas uma força armada e uma polícia, por exemplo." E diz que a crise corrente "sublinha a necessidade dumas forças armadas Australianas maiores."

Mas essas forças armadas cada vez são menos populares em Timor-Leste. Na semana antes de Ramos Horta ter sido atacado, o seu filho Loro escreveu que os Australianos estavam "a abusar da hospitalidade," citando uma série de ultrajes, por exemplo o incidente de Outubro de 2006 quando a ADF estabeleceu postos de controlo à volta do quartel das forças armadas de Timor-Leste. "Taur Matan Ruak foi prevenido sob armas apontadas de sair do seu próprio quartel" até ter sido revistado, o que deixou um trave amargo desta "humilhação às mãos dum soldado adolescente Australiano."

Uma das razões porque a "Força de Estabilização" se estampou ao comprido é por falta de raízes na sociedade local. Reinado escapou ao seu poder porque tinha uma fonte próxima dos Australianos. Contudo parece que ninguém contará nada aos Australianos.

À primeira vista parece que o governo devia ser capaz de fazer um plano económico. No fim de contas há os rendimentos do petróleo e do gás, com mais de um bilião de dólares num fundo especial em Nova Iorque. Horta e Gusmão foram para as eleições do ano passado a prometerem canalisar esses fundos mas pouco fizeram sobre isso. Isto acontece em parte porque a estratégia deles parece ser a de um regime neo-liberal de desregulamentar com impostos mínimos para os negócios e a máxima confiança no espírito empresarial. Mesmo se isso não pusesse em risco de acabar nas mãos de capitalistas predadores a maioria dos recursos, a realidade é que os empresários não arriscam nada no pesadelo de segurança que Timor-Leste é hoje.

Depois do assalto falhado contra Reinado, multidões fizeram barricadas nas ruas de Dili, queimaram pneus e gritaram "Australianos vão-se embora!" A raiva explodiu outra vez quando as tropas atacaram um campo de deslocados perto do aeroporto em 23 de Fevereiro, usando tanques, gás lacrimogénio e balas e mataram duas pessoas. Mas é preciso uma força social mais coerente para desafiar tropas imperialistas. O candidato mais provável é a Fretilin, mas este partido parece mais ansioso para reganhar o controlo parlamentar do que para construir um movimento social mais amplo.

Há uma outro golpe no horizonte para Kevin Rudd, contudo: outras forças do exterior que gostam de se intrometer. Portugal eatá a tentar recuperar algum do seu antigo poder. A bem conhecida estratégica diplomática de China está a construir mega-estruturas para bajular o governo, incluindo o novo edifício do Ministério dos Estrangeiros que de acordo com uma revista é "o maior edifício do país – obscenamente grande – muitas vezes o tamanho do Hospital de Dili Hospital." Eles têm esperança de influência no retorno.

Talvez o mais surpreendente é a re-emergência da Indonésia. Yanto Soegiarto, um jornalista próximo dos militares Indonésios, oferece uma solução para os problemas de Timor-Leste. "Dêem aos militares Indonésios uma oportunidade para restaurar a segurança e a estabilidade em Timor e a situação melhorará. . . . a Indonésia e Timor-Leste têm agora uma relação fraternal. Os Timorenses verão as tropas Indonésias mais como os seus novos irmãos comparados com o estilo Ocidental, dos soldados brancos pesadamente armados que tentam sempre parecer superiores."

Isto não é tão absurdo quanto parece, dadas as multidões que aplaudiam o Presidente Indonésio Yudhoyono quando da sua visita em 2005. O governo de Jacarta, ainda muito intimamente ligados aos militares, não está contente com a visão de um milhar de tropas Australianas ao pé da sua porta e procurará bastante novos caminhos para reganhar peso em Timor-Leste.

Tom O'Lincoln tem sido activo na esquerda desde 1967, no German SDS, na UC Berkeley, e durante muitos anos em Melbourne Australia. É autou ou editor de cinco livros sobre história e políticas Australiana (Into the Mainstream: The Decline of Australian Communism; Years of Rage: Social Conflicts in the Fraser Era; United We Stand: Class Struggle in Colonial Australia; Class and Class Conflict in Australia; e Rebel Women in Australian Working Class History), e mantém o website de intervenções marxistas: www.anu.edu.au/polsci/marx/interventions/. Tom é um membro da Alternativa Socialista.

Anónimo disse...

Perplexidades sobre Timor


Timor voltou às primeiras páginas, por más razões. Sobressaltam-se os corações dos amigos de Timor e cresce a perplexidade de quem não entende o porquê de tantas convulsões, depois de se ter concretizado o sonho da independência. Sofrem os timorenses, e nós com eles.
Desta vez, a vida de dois heróis da luta pela autodeterminação de Timor-Leste - Ramos Horta e Xanana Gusmão - foram colocadas em risco, ficando o Prémio Nobel a escassos milímetros da morte. Seria mais um dos construtores de paz a sucumbir a balas assassinas, juntando-se à galeria onde estão Martin Luther King, Yitzhak Rabin, Anwar Sadat e tantos outros que selaram com o seu sangue o serviço à sua causa. Felizmente, Horta sobreviveu. Para bem de Timor.

As raízes desta crise são complexas. Certo é que, historicamente, a maldição do petróleo e do gás natural traz consigo - tantas vezes! - a turbulência política e a instabilidade institucional, em vez do desenvolvimento e da melhoria das condições de vida das populações. Esta é a explicação mais óbvia. Durante anos, antes da independência, ouvíamos dizer que Timor era tão pobre que jamais poderia ser independente. Hoje, com todas as suas imensas riquezas entretanto descobertas, tememos que não consiga ser independente, por se ter tornado demasiado apetecível. Os interesses econó-micos e geo-estratégicos que se cruzam em Timor, afogam este jovem Estado que não teve tempo para se consolidar.

Mas há mais causas que geram esta instabilidade. O modelo de desenvolvimento económico dinamizado pelo primeiro Governo pós-independência, liderado por Mari Alkatiri, foi desastroso. A falta de capacidade efectiva para criar emprego e para desenvolver as infra-estruturas essenciais, como escolas, hospitais, rede viária e saneamento básico revelou-se fatal. Como bons marxistas ortodoxos, os líderes da Fretilin deviam saber que todas as revoluções nasceram em contextos sociais como este. E, à primeira oportunidade, a convulsão social começou, acabando por gerar uma enorme instabilidade. As Forças de Defesa de Timor-Leste (FDTL), tornaram-se no epicentro dessa crise, gerando cisões e desertores, entre os quais figuras como os famigerados Alfredo Reinado e Gastão Salsinha, protagonistas maiores dos ataques da passada semana.

Neste processo, particularmente nos últimos anos, o papel da Igreja não tem sido tão claro como seria desejável. Sendo verdade que Timor deve à sua Igreja um contributo essencial para a obtenção da independência, não deixa de ser fonte de perplexidade o seu papel actual. Ora, neste momento crítico da vida do Estado timorense, torna-se vital que a Igreja volte a ser factor de unidade e de paz. Que cultive a concórdia e a coesão. Que construa pontes, onde existem abismos. Inspirada pela última encíclica do Santo Padre, a Igreja timorense precisa de se assumir com voz de uma esperança que salva. E Timor precisa de ser salvo.

Rui Marques
Agencia Ecclesia

Blog Na'in disse...

The Timorese will see Indonesian troops more as their new brother compared to the Western-style, heavily-armed white soldiers who always try to look superior."

Well, I've yet to see Australian, New Zealand or Portuguese personnel chopping off Timorese people's heads and displaying them like trophies.

By all means invite troops from fraternal Southeast Asian nations, like the Philippines - there is more to the region than Indonesia.

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.