quinta-feira, fevereiro 14, 2008

A very strange “coup attempt” in East Timor

World Socialist Web Site http://www.wsws.org/
WSWS

By Peter Symonds13 February 2008

Nothing is clear about Monday’s events in the East Timorese capital of Dili, in which rebel soldier Alfredo Reinado was shot dead and the country’s president Jose Ramos-Horta was seriously injured, with gunshot wounds to his chest and stomach. The least likely explanation, however, is the official one by Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao, who immediately claimed that an attempted coup had been thwarted. He then called for Australian military and political support and imposed a state of emergency and curfew.

Gusmao insists that he and the president were the targets of an assassination plot. Reinado and several of his armed supporters arrived at the president’s residence early Monday morning. But if this were an assassination attempt, Reinado, a former army major who trained in Australia, had not done his homework. Ramos-Horta was out for his regular morning walk with two of his bodyguards. Rather than preparing to assassinate him, it is quite possible that Reinado was merely seeking to talk to the president, as he had during the previous period.

There are several versions of what happened next. By some accounts, Reinado and his men disarmed the guards and stormed into the house looking for the president. But yesterday’s Australian indicated that it was in fact the guards themselves who opened fire: “Neighbours and Ramos-Horta’s house staff told the Australian that Reinado did not fire the first shot. Instead, they said he had appeared at the gate asking for the president and was almost immediately shot through the eye.”

Ramos-Horta, who was returning from his walk, was caught in the crossfire. He was hit at least twice, but managed somehow to get to his residence. Sometime later, Australian military doctors managed to stem the loss of blood and stabilise him. The president was flown to the northern Australian city of Darwin for further treatment and is reportedly in a serious but stable condition.

Who was trying to assassinate whom has not been established. With speculation rife in Dili, Gusmao felt compelled to issue a statement declaring: “To put to rest the rumour that the president called Alfredo to kill him, I would like to reiterate that I was also ambushed and targetted. This shows that it was a planned operation from Alfredo.” He concluded with a thinly veiled threat to the media “not to speculate on issues that have not been confirmed”.

While the events at Ramos-Horta’s residence are sketchy, details of the assassination attempt on Gusmao are virtually non-existent. The prime minister claims that his convoy was ambushed by a second group of rebel soldiers headed by Gastao Salsinha, leader of the so-called “petitioners” who were sacked from the army in 2006 for protesting in support of better conditions. Gusmao’s vehicle was sprayed with bullets, but no one was injured and the attackers managed to escape without a trace. Speaking to an Australian reporter, Salsinha denied any involvement in the attack and did not know why Reinado had appeared at the presidential residence.

No adequate explanation has been offered regarding Reinado’s motive for trying to kill the president and prime minister. The Australian media, which feted Reinado in 2006 as one of the leaders of the anti-Fretilin rebels, have generally dismissed him as “a bold, foolish rebel” or a Rambo with delusions of grandeur. While the dead major was no doubt somewhat unstable psychologically, he certainly had a firm grasp of military matters. Two botched “assassination attempts” and “a coup” that included no plans for seizing key centres or dealing with hundreds of Australian and foreign troops and police is an unlikely scenario.

Who benefits?

A useful rule of thumb in such cases is to ask: who benefits? In this case, the question is: who has something to gain from the death of Reinado? At the top of the list is Gusmao—along with his Australian backers.

Just last month, Reinado accused Gusmao of being directly responsible for the army mutiny and violence that preceded the Australian military intervention in 2006. A message circulated by video, but ignored in the Australian media, declared in part: “I give my testimony as a witness, that Xanana is the main author of this crisis, he cannot lie or deny about this... He calls us bad people, but it’s him that created us, turned us to be like this—he is author of the petition... It’s with his support that the petition exists in the first place, it’s his irresponsible speeches to the media that made people to be fighting and killing each other until this moment and he knows many more things—we will talk about this.”

Reinado’s threat to “talk” had far-reaching political implications for Gusmao and for Canberra. In May 2006, former Australian Prime Minister John Howard claimed that the dispatch of troops to East Timor was needed to halt spiralling violence, because the local army was divided and the police force had disintegrated. Gusmao, then president, was calling for Australian troops to intervene and denouncing Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri and his Fretilin government for creating the crisis by sacking the 600 “petitioners”. The Australian media were braying for the “Marxist” Alkatiri to resign over his mishandling of the situation.

Alkatiri is certainly no Marxist, but his government had refused to tamely accept Canberra’s demands for the lion’s share of oil and gas reserves in the Timor Sea. The Howard government, which had deployed troops to East Timor in 1999, had expected that Australia would assume the dominant role in the tiny statelet eventually created in 2001. However, the Alkatiri government had attempted to preserve a modicum of independence by establishing relations with other countries, including the former colonial power Portugal, as well as China, Cuba and Brazil. The dispatch of Australian troops in May 2006 was not to help the East Timorese, but was part of the Howard government’s agenda to oust Alkatiri and install political figures more amenable to Australian demands—notably Gusmao and Ramos-Horta.

Major Reinado, who trained in Canberra in 2005, was a key figure in the events leading up to the military intervention. He had joined the “petitioners” and bitterly denounced the Fretilin government for using violence against the protesting soldiers. He was part of a right-wing chorus gathered around Gusmao, including church leaders, former pro-Indonesian militiamen and businessmen, who were hostile to the very modest reforms being carried out by Alkatiri. They created anti-government youth gangs by exploiting widespread discontent over poverty and unemployment.

Reinado was directly involved in fomenting the mayhem. On the eve of Australian troops landing, his men, accompanied by an Australian camera crew, clashed with government troops, adding to the atmosphere of chaos and breakdown. Gusmao has always insisted that he had no hand in these events. But a growing body of evidence points to his involvement with anti-Fretilin plotters and his links to Reinado.

On the surface, Canberra and its political allies in Dili have achieved everything they wanted since May 2006. Within two months of the military intervention, Alkatiri had capitulated to Canberra’s pressure to resign and was replaced by Ramos-Horta as interim prime minister. He and Gusmao, with the Australian government’s tacit backing, teamed up to contest last year’s presidential and parliamentary elections. Ramos-Horta won the presidency, while Gusmao became the prime minister in bitterly-fought elections marred by violence and allegations of ballot rigging.

None of the underlying issues has been resolved. Fretilin, which won a plurality of seats in the parliamentary elections, continues to challenge the current government’s legitimacy. Gusmao is dependent on an unstable coalition that is facing rising anger over its failure to keep its promises. Having campaigned on pro-poor policies, the government has proposed a budget for 2008 that slashes rice rations for an estimated 100,000 refugees, mainly Fretilin supporters, displaced by the 2006 violence. It will also cut pensions for former Fretilin veterans while providing tax benefits and other financial incentives for business.

Dili remains a nest of political intrigue. Australia, Portugal and Malaysia all have security forces in the tiny country to promote their interests within the government and state apparatus. China and Brazil are providing economic aid to extend their influence. The police and army remain deeply factionalised and there is growing hostility to the continued presence of Australian troops, who remain outside UN control and were widely accused of being partisan in last year’s elections.

For the past 20 months, Reinado has been something of a loose cannon. Though he faced charges of murder and possession of illegal weapons, the major led a charmed life. He was detained on weapons charges in 2006, but literally walked out of the main Dili jail, even though it was guarded by Australian and New Zealand troops. He evaded recapture and was always available for media interviews in his various hideouts. In the lead up to the second presidential round, Ramos-Horta, to secure the support of the right-wing Democratic Party which won 19 percent in the first round, officially called off the hunt for Reinado.

In the midst of the continuing crisis, Reinado’s threat last month to expose Gusmao’s role in 2006 was a political bombshell with the potential to further undermine the East Timorese government and weaken Australian influence. Alkatiri immediately demanded that Gusmao resign and called for fresh elections. Ramos-Horta met Reinado at his base in Maubisse three weeks ago, no doubt to try to allay the major’s frustration that his demand for the dropping of charges had not been met. Last week, Australian troops were involved in a menacing standoff with Reinado as he was meeting with three government parliamentarians. A week later he is dead.

Not only is a troublesome rebel now out of the way, but the governments in Dili and Canberra have immediately exploited the “coup attempt” to strengthen their respective positions. Gusmao imposed a 48-hour state of emergency and curfew and warned that he was going to strengthen security measures to “guarantee that Timor Leste does not become a failed state”.

In an extraordinary flurry of activity, the new Australian Labor Prime Minister Kevin Rudd spoke to Gusmao twice on Monday morning, convened a top level cabinet security committee and within hours had announced the dispatch of an extra 190 troops and federal police who arrived in East Timor yesterday afternoon. Together with naval personnel, Australia now has a security force of 1,000 to stamp its influence over the island. The editorials in yesterday’s Australian press all declared that the new Labor government had passed his first test with flying colours.

Reinado’s death is certainly convenient for Gusmao. Whether there was a conspiracy to kill the major remains to be seen. But one thing is clear: to immediately proclaim Monday’s events as an attempted assassination and coup, as the Australian and international media have universally done, is to seek to block any serious investigation into this thoroughly murky affair.

Copyright 1998-2007World Socialist Web SiteAll rights reserved

Uma muito estranha “tentativa de golpe” em Timor-Leste

World Socialist Web Site www.wsws.org
WSWS

Por Peter Symonds 13 Fevereiro 2008

Nada é claro sobre os eventos de Segunda-feira na capital Timorense, Dili, onde o soldado amotinado Alfredo Reinado foi morto a tiro e o presidente do país José Ramos-Horta ficou seriamente ferido, com tiros no estômago e peito. A explicação menos provável, é a oficial pelo Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão, who imediatamente afirmou que tinha ocorrido uma tentativa de golpe. Depois pediu apoio militar e policial aos Australianos e impôs o recolher obrigatório e o estado de sítio.

Gusmão insiste que ele e o presidente foram alvos duma conspiração de assassínio. Reinado e vários sos seus apoiantes armados chegaram à residência do presidente cedo na manhã de Segunda-feira. Mas se isso fosse uma tentativa de assassínio, Reinado, um antigo major das forças armadas formado na Austrália, não fizera o trabalho de casa. Ramos-Horta estava for a no seu regular passeio da manhã com os guarda-costas. Em vez de se preparar para o assassinar, é bastante possível que Reinado estava apenas a tentar falar com o presidente, como fizera em períodos anteriores.

Há várias versões do que aconteceu depois. Alguns relatam que Reinado e os seus homens desarmaram osguardas e entraram casa dentro à procura do presidente. Mas o Australian de ontem indicou que de facto foram os próprios guardas que abriram fogo: “Vizinhos e empregados da casa de Ramos-Horta disseram aoAustralian que Reinado não disparou o primeiro tiro.Em vez disso tinha aparecido no portão a perguntar pelo presidente e quase imediatamente levou um tiro no olho.”

Ramos-Horta, que regressava do seu passeio, foi apanhado no fogo-cruzado. Foi atingido pelo menos duas vezes, mas de certo modo conseguiu chegar até à residência. Pouco depois, médicos militares Australianos conseguiram parar a perda de sangue e estabilizá-lo. O presidente foi aerotransportado para a cidade norte Australiana de Darwin para mais tratamento e está segundo se relata em condição séria mas estável.

Não se sabe quem é que estava a tentar assassinar quem. Com a especulação a subir em Dili, Gusmão sentiu-se obrigado a emitir uma declaração afirmando: “Para acabar com o rumor de que o presidente chamou Alfredo para o matar, quero reiterar que fui também emboscado e alvejado. Isto mostra que esta foi uma oprração planeada de Alfredo.” Concluiu com uma ameaça velada aos media “para não especularem em questões que não foram confirmadas”.

Enquanto os eventos na residência de Ramos-Horta são vagos, detalhes sobre a tentativa de assassínio ao Gusmão são virtualmente não-existentes. O primeiro-ministro afirma que a sua caravana foi emboscada por um segundo grupo de soldados amotinados liderados por Gastão Salsinha, líder dos chamados “peticionários” que foram despedidos das forças armadas em 2006 por protestarem em apoio de melhores condições. O veículo de Gusmão estava cheio de buracos de balas, mas ninguém ficou ferido e os atacantes conseguiram fugir sem deixar rasto. Falando a um repórter Australiano, Salsinha negou qualquer envolvimento no ataque e não sabia porque é que o Reinado tinha aparecido na residência presidencial.

Não foi oferecida nenhuma explicação adequada sobre os motivos de Reinado para tentar matar o presidente e primeiro-ministro. Os media Australianos que em 2006 adularam Reinado como um dos líderes amotinados anti-Fretilin, agora, no geral trataram-no como “um amotinado descarado, tonto” ou um Rambo com mania de grandeza. Se bem que o falecido major fosse sem dúvida psicológicamente instável, ele certamente tinha um conhecimento firme de matérias militares. Duas “tentativas de assassínio” abortadas e“um golpe” que não incluia planos para a tomada de centros chave ou lidar com centenas de tropas e polícias Australianas e estrangeiras, é um cenário improvável.

Quem beneficia?

Uma regra básica útil nestes casos é perguntar: quem beneficia? Neste caso a questão é: quem é que tem algo a ganhar da morte de Reinado? No topo da lista está Gusmão—juntamente com os seus apoiantes Australianos.

Há apenas um mês, Reinado acusou Gusmão de ser directamente responsável pelo motim das forças armadas e violência que precedeu a intervenção militar Australiana em 2006. Circulou uma mensagem por vídeo, mas ignorada pelos media Australianos, onde declarava em parte: “Dou o meu testemunho como testemunha, que Xanana é o autor principal desta crise, ele não pode mentir ou negar acerca disto... Ele chama-nos gente má, mas foi ele que nos criou, que nos fez assim—ele é o autor da petição... Foi com o seu apoio que existiu a petição em primeiro lugar, foram os seus discursos irresponsáveis aos media que levaram as pessoas a lutar e a matarem-se umas às outras até este momento e ele sabe muitas mais outras coisas—nós falaremos acerca disto.”

A ameaça de Reinado de “falar” tinha implicações políticas que chegariam longe para Gusmão e para Canberra. Em Maio de 2006, o antigo Primeiro-Ministro Australiano John Howard afirmou que era nececcário enviar tropas para Timor-Leste para parar a espiral de violência, porque a forças armadas locais estavam divididas e a força da polícia tinha-se desintegrado. Gusmão, então presidente, pediu às tropas Australianas para intervirem e denunciou o Primeiro-Ministro Mari Alkatiri e o seu governo da Fretilin por terem criado a crise com o despedimento de 600 “peticionários”. Os media Australianos faziam campanha para o “Marxista” Alkatiri resignar pela má gestão da situação.

Obviamente que Alkatiri não é nenhum Marxista, mas o seu governo tinha recusado aceitar as exigências de Canberra para a parte de leão das reservas do petróleo e do gás no Mar de Timor. O governo de Howard, que tinha despachado tropas para Timor-Leste em 1999, tinha esperado que eventualmente a Austrália viesse a assumir o papel dominante no pequeno Estado criado em 2001. Contudo, o governo de Alkatiri tinha tentado preservar um pouco de independência estabelecendo relações com outros países, incluindo a antiga potência colonial, Portugal, bem como a China, Cuba e Brasil. O envio de tropas Australianas em Maio de 2006 não foi para ajudar os Timorenses, mas foi parte da agenda do governo de Howard para derrubar Alkatiri e instalar figuras políticas mais moldáveis às exigências Australianas—nomeadamente Gusmão e Ramos-Horta.

O Major Reinado, que se formou em Canberra em 2005, foi uma figura chave nos eventos que levaram à intervenção militar. Tinha-se juntado aos “peticionários” e denunciado amargamente o governo da Fretilin por usar de violência contra os soldados que protestavam. Ele fez parte dum coro da ala direita que se juntou à volta de Gusmão, incluindo líderes da igreja, antigos milicianos e negociantes pró-Indonésios, que eram hostis às reformas muito modestas que estavam a ser desenvolvidas por Alkatiri. Eles criaram gangues juvenis anti-governo explorando o descontentamento alargado por causa da pobreza e do desemprego.

Reinado esteve directamente envolvido a fomentar a confusão. Na véspera das tropas Australianas desembarcarem, os seus homens, acompanhados por uma equipa de cameramen Australianos, confrontaram-se com tropas do governo, aumentando a atmosfera de caos e ruptura. Gusmão insistiu sempre que nada teve a ver com esses eventos. Mas um crescente conjunto de evidências aponta para o seu envolvimento com conspiradores anti-Fretilin e as suas ligações com Reinado.

À superfície, Canberra e os seus aliados políticos em Dili alcançaram tudo o que queriam alcançar desde Maio de 2006. Dois meses depois da intervenção militar, Alkatiri tinha capitulado às pressões de Canberra para resignar e foi substituído por Ramos-Horta como primeiro-ministro interino. Ele e Gusmão, com o tácito apoio do governo Australiano, juntaram-se para disputar as eleições do ano passado, presidenciais e parlamentares. Ramos-Horta ganhou a presidência, enquanto Gusmão se tornou primeiro-ministro em eleições azedamente disputadas e manchadas pela violência e alegações de fraude.

Nenhumas das questões subjacentes foi resolvida. A Fretilin, que ganhou uma maioria de lugares nas eleições parlamentares, continua a desafiar a legitimidade do corrente governo. Gusmão está dependente duma coligação instável que está a enfrentar crescente descontentamento pelo falhanço de não cumprir as suas promessas. Tendo feito campanha em políticas pró-pobres, o governo propôs um orçamento para 2008 que reduz as rações de arroz para uns estimados 100,000 deslocados, principalmente apoiantes da Fretilin, deslocados pela violência de 2006. Vai também cortar nas pensões dos antigos veteranos da Fretilin, ao mesmo tempo que dá benefícios nos impostos e outros incentivos financeiros aos negócios.

Dili permanece um ninho de intriga política. A Austrália, Portugal e Malásia têm todos forças de segurança no pequeno país para promoverem os seus interesses dentro do governo e do aparelho de Estado. A China e o Brasil estão a dar ajuda económica para alargar a sua influência. A polícia e as forças armadas mantém-se profundamente fraccionadas e há hostilidade crescente à presença continuada das tropas Australianas, que se mantém fora do controlo da ONU e são alargadamente acusadas de terem sido partidários das eleições do ano passado.


Nos últimos 20 meses, Reinado foi como uma bala perdida. Apesar de enfrentar acusações de homicídio e posse ilegal de armas, o major levou uma vida encantada. Foi detido por acusações de armas em 2006, mas caminhou literalmente para fora da prisão principal de Dili, mesmo apesar de estar guardado por tropas Australianas e da Nova Zelândia. Evitou ser capturado novamente e esteve sempre disponível para entrevistas aos media nos seus vários esconderijos. Na aproximação da segunda volta das eleições presidenciais, Ramos-Horta, para garantir o apoio do Partido Democrático de ala direita que ganhara 19 por cento na primeira volta, cancelou oficialmente a procura pelo Reinado.

No meio da crise que continua, a ameaça de Reinado no mês passado de expor o papel de Gusmão em 2006 foi uma bomba política com o potencial de minar mais o governo Timorense e de enfraquecer a influência Australiana. Alkatiri exigiu imediatamente que Gusmão resignasse e pediu eleições antecipadas. Ramos-Horta encontrou-se com Reinado na sua base em Maubisse há três semanas atrás, sem dúvida para tentar acalmar a frustração do major por o seu pedido de deixar cair as acusações não ser atendido. Na semana passada, tropas Australianas estiveram envolvidas num finca-pé ameaçador com Reinado quando este estava reunido com três deputados do governo. Uma semana depois ele está morto.

Não apenas um amotinado causador de problemas está fora do caminho, como os governos em Dili e Canberra exploraram imediatamente a “tentativa de golpe” para reforçar as suas posições. Gusmão impôs um estado de sítio de e o recolher obrigatório de 48 horas e avisou que ia reforçar as medidas de segurança para “garantir que Timor-Leste não se torne um estado falhado”.

Numa extraordinária fúria de actividade, o novo Primeiro-Ministro Australiano do Labor Kevin Rudd falou duas vezes com Gusmão na Segunda-feira de manhã, convocou o comité de segurança de alto nível do gabinete e dentro de horas anunciou o envio de 190 tropas extra e da polícia federal que chegaram a Timor-Leste ontem à tarde. Juntamente com pessoal da marinha, a Austáalia tem agora uma força de segurança de 1,000 membros para carimbar a sua influência sobre a ilha. Todos os editoriais da imprensa Australiana de ontem declaravam que o novo governo do Labor tinha passado o seu primeiro teste com notas altas.

A morte de Reinado é conveniente para Gusmão de certeza absoluta. Fica para ver se havia uma conspiração para matar o major. Mas uma coisa é clara: para proclamarem imediatamente os eventos de Segunda-feira como uma tentativa de assassínio, como os media Australianos e internacionais fizeram universalmente, é tentarem bloquear qualquer investigação séria a este negócio enlameado.

Copyright 1998-2007
World Socialist Web SiteAll rights reserved

5 comentários:

Anónimo disse...

Este artigo é fantastico, resume com a maior clareza, toda a situação desde 2006, traduzam-no rápidamente.

De facto a história dos acontecimentos do passado dia 12 parece muito mal contada desde o início, dá-nos a sensação que, de facto existiria um plano, que não aquele que nos têm vindo tentar impingir, mas um em que a coisa correu mal. O facto do Reinado ter sido morto algum tempo antes do ataque ao Horta, a história de que o Salsinha terá atacado o Xanana e a da Kirsty de repente vir a público “eu também fui!! eu também fui!! (estas duas ‘ultimas também muito dificeis de engolir) levanta sem dúvida algumas suspeitas e pode-nos levar a estabelecer algumas conjecturas:

Sabemos todos, quanto mais não seja através do presente artigo (agora já sabem), que o Reinado a partir de uma determinada altura, passou a exigir os seu dividendos, tornando-se numa figura extremamente incómoda para o Xanana e consequentemente para o Horta, ao ponto de não permitirem que este fosse preso e levado a julgamento, claro que a eminência de a verdade vir a ser conhecida, principalmente em tribunal, deixou tanto o Xanana como Horta preocupados, principalmente o primeiro, que como é sabido, é na realidade o principal responsável pelos acontecimentos de Abril de 2006.

E só não percebeu quem não quis, que o dúo maravilha andou a ganhar tempo e sem saber bem o que haviam de fazer à vida (não era bem a apaziguar, como sustentam algumas teses…), o que não deixa de ter a sua lógica atendendo ao desenrolar dos acontecimentos.

Como não era muito bom da cabeça (paz à sua alma), não andava cá a fazer nada, só incomodava e ainda por cima gostava de “show off”, se calhar não se perdia nada em apagar o Reinado do “filme” até daria algum jeito. É a vítima ideal: autoconfiante, embebido de um romantismo do tipo “Robin dos Bosques” de segunda categoria e de “Rambo” de Terceira; mantendo encontros e conversações secretas da treta com membros do parlamento e até com o próprio Horta. Pelo seu comportamento e protagonismo é a figura típica de pessoa que caí que nem um “patinho” ao ser atraído para mais um ”encontro secreto”, onde afinal lhe limpam o “sarampo sem saber ler nem escrever”.

A forma de o tirarem do caminho foi encontrada, só que alguma coisa correu mal, não era suposto o Horta ter sido atingido. Não vale a pena dizer mais a partir daqui pensem o que quiserem.

Anónimo disse...

È inacreditável como é possível serem, sistemáticamente eliminados comentários ao blog, quando estes fazem todo o sentido, até parece que têm o PBV a fazer de censor... portanto a partir de agora...mudámo-nos para outro...GUERRA AO BLOG... ha ha ha vai ser giro

Meira da Rocha disse...

De toda a imprensa internacional, este foi o melhor artigo, até agora. A mim, aqui do Brasil, cada vez mais parece que "armaram" para Reinado. Parece-me que ele foi conversar com o presidente e foi traído. O tiroteio de 2006 também parece suspeito.

Anónimo disse...

It is always a pleasure to read the simple TRUTH. Congratulations Peter.

A VERDADE NOS CONDUZ A LUZ ETERNA

Anónimo disse...

Tradução:
0 Uma muito estranha “tentativa de golpe” em Timor-Leste
World Socialist Web Site www.wsws.org
WSWS

Por Peter Symonds 13 Fevereiro 2008

Nada é claro sobre os eventos de Segunda-feira na capital Timorense, Dili, onde o soldado amotinado Alfredo Reinado foi morto a tiro e o presidente do país José Ramos-Horta ficou seriamente ferido, com tiros no estômago e peito. A explicação menos provável, é a oficial pelo Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão, who imediatamente afirmou que tinha ocorrido uma tentativa de golpe. Depois pediu apoio militar e policial aos Australianos e impôs o recolher obrigatório e o estado de Sírio.

Gusmão insiste que ele e o presidente foram alvos duma conspiração de assassínio. Reinado e vários sos seus apoiantes armados chegaram à residência do presidente cedo na manhã de Segunda-feira. Mas se isso fosse uma tentativa de assassínio, Reinado, um antigo major das forças armadas formado na Austrália, não fizera o trabalho de casa. Ramos-Horta estava for a no seu regular passeio da manhã com os guarda-costas. Em vez de se preparar para o assassinar, é bastante possível que Reinado estava apenas a tentar falar com o presidente, como fizera em períodos anteriores.

Há várias versões do que aconteceu depois. Alguns relatam que Reinado e os seus homens desarmaram osguardas e entraram casa dentro à procura do presidente. Mas o Australian de ontem indicou que de facto foram os próprios guardas que abriram fogo: “Vizinhos e empregados da casa de Ramos-Horta disseram aoAustralian que Reinado não disparou o primeiro tiro.Em vez disso tinha aparecido no portão a perguntar pelo presidente e quase imediatamente levou um tiro no olho.”

Ramos-Horta, que regressava do seu passeio, foi apanhado no fogo-cruzado. Foi atingido pelo menos duas vezes, mas de certo modo conseguiu chegar até à residência. Pouco depois, médicos militares Australianos conseguiram parar a perda de sangue e estabilizá-lo. O presidente foi aerotransportado para a cidade norte Australiana de Darwin para mais tratamento e está segundo se relata em condição séria mas estável.

Não se sabe quem é que estava a tentar assassinar quem. Com a especulação a subir em Dili, Gusmão sentiu-se obrigado a emitir uma declaração afirmando: “Para acabar com o rumor de que o presidente chamou Alfredo para o matar, quero reiterar que fui também emboscado e alvejado. Isto mostra que esta foi uma oprração planeada de Alfredo.” Concluiu com uma ameaça velada aos media “para não especularem em questões que não foram confirmadas”.

Enquanto os eventos na residência de Ramos-Horta são vagos, detalhes sobre a tentativa de assassínio ao Gusmão são virtualmente não-existentes. O primeiro-ministro afirma que a sua caravana foi emboscada por um segundo grupo de soldados amotinados liderados por Gastão Salsinha, líder dos chamados “peticionários” que foram despedidos das forças armadas em 2006 por protestarem em apoio de melhores condições. O veículo de Gusmão estava cheio de buracos de balas, mas ninguém ficou ferido e os atacantes conseguiram fugir sem deixar rasto. Falando a um repórter Australiano, Salsinha negou qualquer envolvimento no ataque e não sabia porque é que o Reinado tinha aparecido na residência presidencial.

Não foi oferecida nenhuma explicação adequada sobre os motivos de Reinado para tentar matar o presidente e primeiro-ministro. Os media Australianos que em 2006 adularam Reinado como um dos líderes amotinados anti-Fretilin, agora, no geral trataram-no como “um amotinado descarado, tonto” ou um Rambo com mania de grandeza. Se bem que o falecido major fosse sem dúvida psicológicamente instável, ele certamente tinha um conhecimento firme de matérias militares. Duas “tentativas de assassínio” abortadas e“um golpe” que não incluia planos para a tomada de centros chave ou lidar com centenas de tropas e polícias Australianas e estrangeiras, é um cenário improvável.

Quem beneficia?

Uma regra básica útil nestes casos é perguntar: quem beneficia? Neste caso a questão é: quem é que tem algo a ganhar da morte de Reinado? No topo da lista está Gusmão—juntamente com os seus apoiantes Australianos.

Há apenas um mês, Reinado acusou Gusmão de ser directamente responsável pelo motim das forças armadas e violência que precedeu a intervenção militar Australiana em 2006. Circulou uma mensagem por vídeo, mas ignorada pelos media Australianos, onde declarava em parte: “Dou o meu testemunho como testemunha, que Xanana é o autor principal desta crise, ele não pode mentir ou negar acerca disto... Ele chama-nos gente má, mas foi ele que nos criou, que nos fez assim—ele é o autor da petição... Foi com o seu apoio que existiu a petição em primeiro lugar, foram os seus discursos irresponsáveis aos media que levaram as pessoas a lutar e a matarem-se umas às outras até este momento e ele sabe muitas mais outras coisas—nós falaremos acerca disto.”

A ameaça de Reinado de “falar” tinha implicações políticas que chegariam longe para Gusmão e para Canberra. Em Maio de 2006, o antigo Primeiro-Ministro Australiano John Howard afirmou que era nececcário enviar tropas para Timor-Leste para parar a espiral de violência, porque a forças armadas locais estavam divididas e a força da polícia tinha-se desintegrado. Gusmão, então presidente, pediu às tropas Australianas para intervirem e denunciou o Primeiro-Ministro Mari Alkatiri e o seu governo da Fretilin por terem criado a crise com o despedimento de 600 “peticionários”. Os media Australianos faziam campanha para o “Marxista” Alkatiri resignar pela má gestão da situação.

Obviamente que Alkatiri não é nenhum Marxista, mas o seu governo tinha recusado aceitar as exigências de Canberra para a parte de leão das reservas do petróleo e do gás no Mar de Timor. O governo de Howard, que tinha despachado tropas para Timor-Leste em 1999, tinha esperado que eventualmente a Austrália viesse a assumir o papel dominante no pequeno Estado criado em 2001. Contudo, o governo de Alkatiri tinha tentado preservar um pouco de independência estabelecendo relações com outros países, incluindo a antiga potência colonial, Portugal, bem como a China, Cuba e Brasil. O envio de tropas Australianas em Maio de 2006 não foi para ajudar os Timorenses, mas foi parte da agenda do governo de Howard para derrubar Alkatiri e instalar figuras políticas mais moldáveis às exigências Australianas—nomeadamente Gusmão e Ramos-Horta.

O Major Reinado, que se formou em Canberra em 2005, foi uma figura chave nos eventos que levaram à intervenção militar. Tinha-se juntado aos “peticionários” e denunciado amargamente o governo da Fretilin por usar de violência contra os soldados que protestavam. Ele fez parte dum coro da ala direita que se juntou à volta de Gusmão, incluindo líderes da igreja, antigos milicianos e negociantes pró-Indonésios, que eram hostis às reformas muito modestas que estavam a ser desenvolvidas por Alkatiri. Eles criaram gangues juvenis anti-governo explorando o descontentamento alargado por causa da pobreza e do desemprego.

Reinado esteve directamente envolvido a fomentar a confusão. Na véspera das tropas Australianas desembarcarem, os seus homens, acompanhados por uma equipa de cameramen Australianos, confrontaram-se com tropas do governo, aumentando a atmosfera de caos e ruptura. Gusmão insistiu sempre que nada teve a ver com esses eventos. Mas um crescente conjunto de evidências aponta para o seu envolvimento com conspiradores anti-Fretilin e as suas ligações com Reinado.

À superfície, Canberra e os seus aliados políticos em Dili alcançaram tudo o que queriam alcançar desde Maio de 2006. Dois meses depois da intervenção militar, Alkatiri tinha capitulado às pressões de Canberra para resignar e foi substituído por Ramos-Horta como primeiro-ministro interino. Ele e Gusmão, com o tácito apoio do governo Australiano, juntaram-se para disputar as eleições do ano passado, presidenciais e parlamentares. Ramos-Horta ganhou a presidência, enquanto Gusmão se tornou primeiro-ministro em eleições azedamente disputadas e manchadas pela violência e alegações de fraude.

Nenhumas das questões subjacentes foi resolvida. A Fretilin, que ganhou uma maioria de lugares nas eleições parlamentares, continua a desafiar a legitimidade do corrente governo. Gusmão está dependente duma coligação instável que está a enfrentar crescente descontentamento pelo falhanço de não cumprir as suas promessas. Tendo feito campanha em políticas pró-pobres, o governo propôs um orçamento para 2008 que reduz as rações de arroz para uns estimados 100,000 deslocados, principalmente apoiantes da Fretilin, deslocados pela violência de 2006. Vai também cortar nas pensões dos antigos veteranos da Fretilin, ao mesmo tempo que dá benefícios nos impostos e outros incentivos financeiros aos negócios.

Dili permanece um ninho de intriga política. A Austrália, Portugal e Malásia têm todos forças de segurança no pequeno país para promoverem os seus interesses dentro do governo e do aparelho de Estado. A China e o Brasil estão a dar ajuda económica para alargar a sua influência. A polícia e as forças armadas mantém-se profundamente fraccionadas e há hostilidade crescente à presença continuada das tropas Australianas, que se mantém fora do controlo da ONU e são alargadamente acusadas de terem sido partidários das eleições do ano passado.

Nos últimos 20 meses, Reinado foi como uma bala perdida. Apesar de enfrentar acusações de homicídio e posse ilegal de armas, o major levou uma vida encantada. Foi detido por acusações de armas em 2006, mas caminhou literalmente para fora da prisão principal de Dili, mesmo apesar de estar guardado por tropas Australianas e da Nova Zelândia. Evitou ser capturado novamente e esteve sempre disponível para entrevistas aos media nos seus vários esconderijos. Na aproximação da segunda volta das eleições presidenciais, Ramos-Horta, para garantir o apoio do Partido Democrático de ala direita que ganhara 19 por cento na primeira volta, cancelou oficialmente a procura pelo Reinado.

No meio da crise que continua, a ameaça de Reinado no mês passado de expor o papel de Gusmão em 2006 foi uma bomba política com o potencial de minar mais o governo Timorense e de enfraquecer a influência Australiana. Alkatiri exigiu imediatamente que Gusmão resignasse e pediu eleições antecipadas. Ramos-Horta encontrou-se com Reinado na sua base em Maubisse há três semanas atrás, sem dúvida para tentar acalmar a frustração do major por o seu pedido de deixar cair as acusações não ser atendido. Na semana passada, tropas Australianas estiveram envolvidas num finca-pé ameaçador com Reinado quando este estava reunido com três deputados do governo. Uma semana depois ele está morto.

Não apenas um amotinado causador de problemas está fora do caminho, como os governos em Dili e Canberra exploraram imediatamente a “tentativa de golpe” para reforçar as suas posições. Gusmão impôs um estado de sítio de e o recolher obrigatório de 48 horas e avisou que ia reforçar as medidas de segurança para “garantir que Timor-Leste não se torne um estado falhado”.

Numa extraordinária fúria de actividade, o novo Primeiro-Ministro Australiano do Labor Kevin Rudd falou duas vezes com Gusmão na Segunda-feira de manhã, convocou o comité de segurança de alto nível do gabinete e dentro de horas anunciou o envio de 190 tropas extra e da polícia federal que chegaram a Timor-Leste ontem à tarde. Juntamente com pessoal da marinha, a Austáalia tem agora uma força de segurança de 1,000 membros para carimbar a sua influência sobre a ilha. Todos os editoriais da imprensa Australiana de ontem declaravam que o novo governo do Labor tinha passado o seu primeiro teste com notas altas.

A morte de Reinado é conveniente para Gusmão de certeza absoluta. Fica para ver se havia uma conspiração para matar o major. Mas uma coisa é clara: para proclamarem imediatamente os eventos de Segunda-feira como uma tentativa de assassínio, como os media Australianos e internacionais fizeram universalmente, é tentarem bloquear qualquer investigação séria a este negócio enlameado.

Copyright 1998-2007World Socialist Web SiteAll rights reserved

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.