segunda-feira, janeiro 28, 2008

Indonesia-Australia ties: What went wrong?

The Jakarta Post
Opinion
January 28, 2008


CANBERRA (JP): As the Timor crisis deepened in 1999, relations between Australia and Indonesia soured, and then deteriorated seriously, sharply and unexpectedly in September-October.

After a decade of seemingly positive and broad-based expansion, developing into what some came to regard as an emerging 'special relationship', these two months witnessed unprecedented recrimination and antagonism.

Although an open, formal rift was avoided, the cooling of relations was reflected in public statements made at the highest level.

President Habibie referred in the Indonesian parliament to Australia's unwelcome 'interference in Indonesian affairs', while Prime Minister Howardspoke of the need to assert 'Australian values' in the region rather than kowtowing to the policies of neighbors, referring (implicitly) especially to Indonesia.

At the heart of the matter was the crisis in East Timor. The extensive and almost instantaneous coverage by the international electronic media of the tragic events in Timor, together with its tendency to highlight isolated and extreme reactions in both countries, heightened the sense of crisis.

It contributed to emotional responses. Australian unions boycotted Indonesian ships and Garuda passengers were harassed, the Indonesian flag was burnt and the Indonesian Ambassador could not enter his office for overa week.

In Indonesia, in response, there was an almost continuous demonstration outside the Australian embassy, seemingly (if TV shots were to be believed)verging on violence.

Australian offices were attacked and Australian citizens threatened. At the nadir of the relationship in early October 1999, Indonesians saw Australia -- seemingly too enthusiastically -- take the lead in the formation of a multinational force, UNAMET, to restore order following the post referendum militia rampage in Timor.

But many Indonesians saw Australians zealously entering 'their territory'(as most Indonesians regarded East Timor then), and behaving in a militaristic and bellicose fashion -- the armed Australian soldier standingover the defenseless Timorese youth, for example.

How and why was the relationship so easily and quickly derailed? And where do we go from here?

Answers to these questions are important, not just for Australia and Indonesia but, more broadly -- since the two countries are the dominant powers of the South Pacific and Southeast Asia respectively -- for the harmony of the region.

It was not just the Australian actions which angered many Indonesians. Australia's style was unpalatable. Indonesia expected its neighbor to show some understanding of Jakarta's predicament (at least that of a weak civilian government), and to help calm the situation.

But instead Australia appeared to take the lead in condemning Indonesia. The voice of Australia -- its media, its politicians and its people -- appeared more strident than any other. Even liberal-minded and sympathetic Indonesian figures, such as Sarwono Kusumaatmadja and journalist Wimar Witoelar, saw Australian reactions as 'arrogant' or 'insensitive', its words and actions smacking more of a colonial power than an understanding neighbor.

Conversely, in September, Australians watched each night on television the abuse of a poor and innocent people, whose only 'crime' was that they clearly and decisively voted for Independence.

Why couldn't the all-powerful Indonesia military assist these people and control the violence, Australians (and indeed the world) asked.

Why was the government in Jakarta so seemingly two-faced in response to international criticism?

The immediate cause of tension -- a process of decolonization, strongly opposed by elements of the Indonesian military and equally strongly supported by large sections of the Australian public, and by their government -- which erupted in violence, was as difficult a problem as mostneighbors will ever face.

In one sense, it was a credit to the leaders of both countries that diplomatic relations remained open, despite many calls from their domestic constituencies for radical action.

But beyond the immediate rift, ill-informed recriminations and the proliferation of stereotypes revealed that there is still a fundamental lack of understanding of national characteristics and political processes in each country -- a lack of understanding which was all too easily manipulated by mischievous elements on both sides.

Among these caricatures of each other, Indonesians often view Australiansas white, racist, rich, arrogant, and possessing an unrivaled propensity tolecture other countries.

On the other hand, many Australians continue to view Indonesia (even after fall of the Soeharto) as corrupt, brutal, militaristic, authoritarian, and maintaining an iron grip on a reluctant non-Javanese citizenry in the eastern provinces.

Like all caricatures, there is an element of truth in these views. But asgeneralizations they are seriously distorted. Many Australians, especially in the media, failed -- or didn't want -- to recognize, the broad-based improvements in Indonesian living standards since the mid 1960s, across both socio-economic groups and its far-flung regions.

Australians have also tended to pay scant attention to deep historical and cultural sensitivities. Having never been a poverty stricken colony, never been invaded by a foreign power, and never had to fight a protracted and bloody war of Independence, most Australians don't have the historicalperspective to understand Indonesian sensitivities on key issues.

Flag-burning, for example, arouses little passion in Australia, yet for most Indonesians it is a highly provocative action.

With a hard-fought Independence achieved just two generations ago, destruction and defamation of national symbols by a neighbor is quite shocking to many Indonesians.

The fact that Australians are predominantly rich and white, and are culturally disposed towards frank and blunt expressions of opinion abroad -- mirroring the style of domestic debate -- further complicates the issue. These misperceptions work in both directions, however. It is true that Australia maintained a discriminatory immigration policy until about 1970 (the so-called 'White Australia Policy'), and that for the first 180 years of European settlement the treatment of aboriginal people was disgraceful.

But things have changed much in Australia over the past 30 years. Australia now has an open, non-discriminatory immigration program, matched by very few countries.

The resulting societal transformation has been rapid and Australia is arguably one of the world's most vibrant multi-cultural societies.

Its generous refugee program has few parallels, certainly in this region.It is true that this 'multiracialism has been strongly criticized at home -- the 'Pauline Hanson' factor.

But the immigration program continues to attract bi-partisan political support. The One Nation party is now in decline and never captured votes ona scale comparable to similar parties in the U.S. and Europe.

It is also true that Australia's aboriginal community (numbering about 250,000 persons) have unacceptably low living standards. But there are many'positive discrimination' programs and the community's problems are openly acknowledged and debated within and outside government.

In addition, Australia continues to be one of the major donors to Indonesia, including a generous scholarship program. It strongly supported the international financial rescue effort in the wake of the economic crisis and, despite fiscal austerity at home, the real value of aid has been broadly maintained.

Australia's per capita income is now below both Singapore and Hong Kong, neither of whom provides aid to Indonesia.

The Australian press is often seen as a complicating factor in bilateral relations. It is easy to understand Indonesians' anger here: in recent times, the extraordinarily rude and ill-informed television interview with the Indonesian ambassador on a commercial network, and the 60 Minutes team crassly walking into a 'minefield' by asking queuing East Timorese how theywould vote in the referendum.

More generally, many Australian journalists, with their single-minded focus on human rights, East Timor, and corruption, have failed dismally to present a balanced picture of the complexity of Indonesia.

There is no doubt that, rightly or wrongly, the murder of five journalists in Balibo in late 1975 has contributed to this press hostility towards Indonesia. But, while Indonesian dismay is quite understandable, here too the issue is not amenable to sweeping generalizations. There have been some very fine Australian journalists in Indonesia, particularly in the print media.

Indonesia's sometimes heavy handed press controls needlessly antagonized the foreign (and of course the domestic) press. And the problems with the Australian press have arisen in part from proximity and familiarity.

The New York Times, London's Guardian, Dutch papers, the BBC and CNN have often been just as critical as Australian outlets. But because there are not as many of them, and they don't report as often, the tensions have not been so great.

The authors are respectively professor of economics and head of the Indonesia Project, Research School of Pacific Studies and Asian Studies, and Asia-Pacific School of Economics and Management, the Australian National University.

TRADUÇÃO:

Laços Indonésia-Austrália: O que correu mal?
The Jakarta Post
Opinião
Janeiro 28, 2008

CANBERRA (JP): Quando se aprofundava a crise de Timor em 1999, as relações entre a Austrália e a Indonésia azedavam e depois deterioraram-se seriamente, agudamente e inesperadamente em Setembro-Outubro.

Depois duma década do que parecia um desenvolvimento positivo e de expansão de base alargada no que alguns vieram a encarar como uma “relação especial” emergente, esses dois meses testemunharam uma recriminação sem precedentes e antagonismo.

Apesar de se ter evitado uma briga aberta e formal, o arrefecimento das relações foi reflectido em declarações publicas ao mais alto níveL.

O Presidente Habibie no parlamento Indonésio referiu-se à não bem-vista 'interferência da Austrália nos assuntos Indonésios', enquanto o Primeiro-Ministro Howard falou da necessidade de afirmar os 'valores Australianos' na região em vez de prostrar-se a políticas dos vizinhos, referindo-se (implicitamente) especialmente à Indonésia.

No coração da questão estava a crise em Timor-Leste. A extensiva e quase instantânea cobertura pelos media internacionais electrónicos dos trágicos eventos em Timor, juntamente com a sua tendência para iluminar reacções isoladas e extremas em ambos os países, aumentou o sentinmento de crise.

Isso contribuiu para respostas emocionais. Sindicatos Australianos boicotaram navios Indonésios e passageiros do Garuda foram assediados, a bandeira Indonésia foi queimada e o embaixador Indonésio não pode entrar no seu gabinete durante uma semana.

Na Indonésia,em resposta, houve manifestações quase continuas no exterior da embaixada Australiana, parecendo (se se acreditasse nas filmagens da TV ) que se aproximavam da violência.

Escritórios Australianos foram atacados e cidadãos Australianos ameaçados. No ponto mais baixo das relações no princípio de Outubro de 1999, os Indonésios viam a Austrália – aparentemente demasiadamente entusiasmada – a tomar a liderança na formação duma força multinacional, a UNAMET, para restaurar a ordem depois da fúria pós-referendo das milícias em Timor.

Mas muitos Indonésios viram os Australianos a entrarem com zelo 'no território deles' (como a maioria dos Indonésios encaravam então Timor-Leste), e a comportarem-se de modo militarista e bélico – o soldado Australiano armado de pé sobre o jovem Timorense sem defesa, por exemplo.

Como e porque é que a relação descarrilou tão facil e rapidamente? E para onde ir depois daqui?
Respostas a estas questões são importantes, não apenas para a Austrália e a Indonésia mas, mais amplamente – dado que os dois países são os poderes dominantes do Pacífico Sul e do Sudeste Asiático respectivamente –para a harmonia da região.

Não foram apenas as acções Australianas que enraiveceram muitos Indonésios. O estilo da Austrália era intragável. A Indonésia esperava que os seus vizinhos mostrassem alguma compreensão com a situação grave de Jacarta (pelo menos de um governo civil fraco), e ajudasse a acalmar a situação.

Mas em vez disso a Austrália parecia tomar a liderança na condenação da Indonésia. A voz da Austrália – os seus media, os seus políticos e o seu povo – pareciam mais estridentes que quaisquer outros. Mesno figuras de pensamento liberal e simpatizantes dos Indonésios, como Sarwono Kusumaatmadja e o jornalista Wimar Witoelar, viram as reacções Australianas como 'arrogantes' ou 'insensíveis', as suas palavras e acções mais parecidas com um poder colonial do que de um vizinho compreensivo.

De modo oposto, em Setembro, os Australianos viam todas as noites na televisão o abuso de um povo pobre e inocente, cujo único 'crime' foi ter votado com clareza e decisão pela Independência.
Poeque é que as todas poderosas forças militares Indonésias não assistiam esse povo e não controlavam a violência, perguntavam os Australianos (e na verdade o mundo).

Porque é que o governo em Jacarta parecia tão dúbio na resposta às críticas internacionais?

A causa imediata da tensão –um processo de descolonização, fortemente oposto por elementos das forças militares Indonésios e igualmente apoiado fortemente por largas secções da população Australiana e pelos seus governos – que irrompeu em violência foi um problema difícil que a maioria dos vizinhos enfrentarão alguma vez.

Num sentido, foi um crédito para os líderes de ambos os países que as relações diplomáticas se mantivessem abertas, apesar dos muitos pedidos domésticos para acções radicais.

Mas para além da briga imediata, as recriminações de má-fé e a proliferação de estereotipos revelaram que há ainda uma fundamental falta de entendimento das características nacionais e dos processos políticos em casa país – uma falta de entendimento que foi demasiadamente fácil manipulada por malévolos elementos em ambos os lados.

Entre essas caricaturas de cada um, os Indonésios vêem muitas vezes os Australianos como sendo brancos, racistas, ricos, arrogantes, e com uma propensão sem igual para dar sermões aos outros países.

Por outro lado, muitos Australianos continuam a ver a Indonésia (mesmo depois da queda de Soeharto) como corrupta, brutal, militarista, autoritária e mantendo uma mão de ferro sobre cidadãos não-Javaneses relutantes nas províncias do leste.

Como todas as caricaturas, há um elemento de verdade nessas opiniões. Mas como generalizações estão seriamente distorcidas. Muitos Australianos, especialmente nos media, falharam – ou não quiseram – reconhecer as alargadas melhorias nos padrões de vida dos Indonésios desde meados de 1960s, no seio quer de grupos socio-económicos quer das regiões dos extremos.

Os Australianos têm também a tendência de prestar pouca atenção a sensibilidades profundas históricas e culturais. Nunca tendo sido uma colónia que tenha sofrido a pobreza, nunca tendo sido invadida por um poder estrangeiro e nunca tendo tido de lutar numa guerra de independência prolongada e sangrenta, a maioria dos Australianos não têm a perspectiva histórica para entender a sensibilidade Indonésia em questões chave.

O queimar de bandeiras, por exemplo, levanta poucas paixões na Austrália, contudo para a maioria dos Indonésios é uma acção altamente provocatória.

Com uma Independência duramente conquistada apenas há duas gerações, para muitos Indonésios é altamente chocante a destruição e a difamação de símbolos nacionais por um vizinho.

O facto dos Australianos serem predominantemente ricos e brancos, e culturalmente dispostos a expressar a opinião sem papas no exterior –espelhando o estilo do debate doméstico – ainda mais complicou a questão. Essas mas interpretações trabalharam nas duas direcções, contudo. É verdade que a Austrália manteve uma política de discriminação na imigração até cerca de 1970 (a chamada 'Política da Austrália Branca'), e que nos primeiros 180 anos de instalação Europeia foi desgraçado o tratamento do povo aborígene.

Mas as coisas mudaram muito na Austrália nos últimos 30 anos. Agora a Austrália tem um programa aberto, non-discriminatório de imigração, igualado por muitos poucos países.
A resultante transformação da sociedade foi rápida e a Austrália é sem dúvida uma das sociedades mais vibrantes e multi-culturais do mundo.

O seu programa generoso de refugiados tem poucos paralelos, certamente nesta região. É verdade que este 'multiracialismo tem sido fortemente criticado em casa – o factor 'Pauline Hanson.

Mas o programa de imigração continua a atrair apoio político bi-partidário. O partido Uma Nação agora está em declínio e nunca captou votos numa escala comparável a partidos similares nos USA e na Europa.

É também verdade que a comunidade aborígene da Austrália (num número de cerca de 250,000 pessoas) têm padrões de baixo nível de vida inaceitáveis. Mas há muitos programas de 'discriminação positiva' e os problemas da comunidade são abertamente reconhecidos e debatidos dentro e fora do governo.

Em adição, a Austrália continua a ser um dos maiores dadores da Indonésia, incluindo um programa de bolsas de estudo generoso. Apoiou fortemente o apoio financeiro internacional no início da crise económica e apesar da austeridade fiscal em casa, o valor real da ajuda tem sido largamente mantida.

O rendimento per capita da Austrália está agora abaixo quer de Singapura quer de Hong Kong, e nenhum deles dá ajuda à Indonésia.

A imprensa Australiana é muitas vezes vista como um factor de complicação nas relações bilaterais. É fácil de entender a raiva dos Indonésios aqui: em tempos recentes, a entrevista na televisão extraordinariamente rude e mal-informada com o embaixador Indonésio num canal comercial e a equipa dos 60 Minutos a caminhar grosseiramente num 'campo de minas' ao perguntar aos Timorenses em fila como é que eles iriam votar no referendo.

Mais geralmente, muitos jornalistas Australianos, com o seu foco apenas em direitos humanos, Timor-Leste e corrupção, falharam tristemente em dar uma imagem equilibrada da complexidade da Indonésia.

Não há dúvida que, certo ou errado, o assassínio dos cinco jornalistas em Balibo no final de 1975 contribuiu para a hostilidade da imprensa em relação à Indonésia. Mas, enquanto o espanto dos Indonésios é bastante compreensível, também aqui a questão não se resolve com generalizações abrangentes. Tem havido alguns bons jornalistas Australianos na Indonésia, particularmente na imprensa.

Às vezes o controlo de mão pesada da imprensa da Indonésia antagonizou sem necessidade a imprensa estrangeira (e obviamente a doméstica). E os problemas com a imprensa Australiana cresceram em parte da proximidade e da familiaridade.

O The New York Times, o Guardian de Londres, os jornais Holandeses, a BBC e a CNN têm sido muitas vezes tão críticos quanto as publicações Australianas. Mas por não haver tantos, e não noticiam tantas vezes, as tensões não foram tão grandes.

Os autores são respectivamente professor de economia e responsável do Indonesia Project, Research School of Pacific Studies and Asian Studies, e Asia-Pacific School of Economics and Management, the Australian National University.

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Laços Indonésia-Austrália: O que correu mal?
The Jakarta Post
Opinião
Janeiro 28, 2008


CANBERRA (JP): Quando se aprofundava a crise de Timor em 1999, as relações entre a Austrália e a Indonésia azedavam e depois deterioraram-se seriamente, agudamente e inesperadamente em Setembro-Outubro.

Depois duma década do que parecia um desenvolvimento positivo e de expansão de base alargada no que alguns vieram a encarar como uma “relação especial” emergente, esses dois meses testemunharam uma recriminação sem precedentes e antagonismo.

Apesar de se ter evitado uma briga aberta e formal, o arrefecimento das relações foi reflectido em declarações publicas ao mais alto níveL.

O Presidente Habibie no parlamento Indonésio referiu-se à não bem-vista 'interferência da Austrália nos assuntos Indonésios', enquanto o Primeiro-Ministro Howard falou da necessidade de afirmar os 'valores Australianos' na região em vez de prostrar-se a políticas dos vizinhos, referindo-se (implicitamente) especialmente à Indonésia.

No coração da questão estava a crise em Timor-Leste. A extensiva e quase instantânea cobertura pelos media internacionais electrónicos dos trágicos eventos em Timor, juntamente com a sua tendência para iluminar reacções isoladas e extremas em ambos os países, aumentou o sentinmento de crise.

Isso contribuiu para respostas emocionais. Sindicatos Australianos boicotaram navios Indonésios e passageiros do Garuda foram assediados, a bandeira Indonésia foi queimada e o embaixador Indonésio não pode entrar no seu gabinete durante uma semana.

Na Indonésia,em resposta, houve manifestações quase continuas no exterior da embaixada Australiana, parecendo (se se acreditasse nas filmagens da TV ) que se aproximavam da violência.

Escritórios Australianos foram atacados e cidadãos Australianos ameaçados. No ponto mais baixo das relações no princípio de Outubro de 1999, os Indonésios viam a Austrália – aparentemente demasiadamente entusiasmada – a tomar a liderança na formação duma força multinacional, a UNAMET, para restaurar a ordem depois da fúria pós-referendo das milícias em Timor.

Mas muitos Indonésios viram os Australianos a entrarem com zelo 'no território deles' (como a maioria dos Indonésios encaravam então Timor-Leste), e a comportarem-se de modo militarista e bélico – o soldado Australiano armado de pé sobre o jovem Timorense sem defesa, por exemplo.

Como e porque é que a relação descarrilou tão facil e rapidamente? E para onde ir depois daqui?

Respostas a estas questões são importantes, não apenas para a Austrália e a Indonésia mas, mais amplamente – dado que os dois países são os poderes dominantes do Pacífico Sul e do Sudeste Asiático respectivamente –para a harmonia da região.

Não foram apenas as acções Australianas que enraiveceram muitos Indonésios. O estilo da Austrália era intragável. A Indonésia esperava que os seus vizinhos mostrassem alguma compreensão com a situação grave de Jacarta (pelo menos de um governo civil fraco), e ajudasse a acalmar a situação.

Mas em vez disso a Austrália parecia tomar a liderança na condenação da Indonésia. A voz da Austrália – os seus media, os seus políticos e o seu povo – pareciam mais estridentes que quaisquer outros. Mesno figuras de pensamento liberal e simpatizantes dos Indonésios, como Sarwono Kusumaatmadja e o jornalista Wimar Witoelar, viram as reacções Australianas como 'arrogantes' ou 'insensíveis', as suas palavras e acções mais parecidas com um poder colonial do que de um vizinho compreensivo.

De modo oposto, em Setembro, os Australianos viam todas as noites na televisão o abuso de um povo pobre e inocente, cujo único 'crime' foi ter votado com clareza e decisão pela Independência.

Poeque é que as todas poderosas forças militares Indonésias não assistiam esse povo e não controlavam a violência, perguntavam os Australianos (e na verdade o mundo).

Porque é que o governo em Jacarta parecia tão dúbio na resposta às críticas internacionais?

A causa imediata da tensão –um processo de descolonização, fortemente oposto por elementos das forças militares Indonésios e igualmente apoiado fortemente por largas secções da população Australiana e pelos seus governos – que irrompeu em violência foi um problema difícil que a maioria dos vizinhos enfrentarão alguma vez.

Num sentido, foi um crédito para os líderes de ambos os países que as relações diplomáticas se mantivessem abertas, apesar dos muitos pedidos domésticos para acções radicais.

Mas para além da briga imediata, as recriminações de má-fé e a proliferação de estereotipos revelaram que há ainda uma fundamental falta de entendimento das características nacionais e dos processos políticos em casa país – uma falta de entendimento que foi demasiadamente fácil manipulada por malévolos elementos em ambos os lados.

Entre essas caricaturas de cada um, os Indonésios vêem muitas vezes os Australianos como sendo brancos, racistas, ricos, arrogantes, e com uma propensão sem igual para dar sermões aos outros países.

Por outro lado, muitos Australianos continuam a ver a Indonésia (mesmo depois da queda de Soeharto) como corrupta, brutal, militarista, autoritária e mantendo uma mão de ferro sobre cidadãos não-Javaneses relutantes nas províncias do leste.

Como todas as caricaturas, há um elemento de verdade nessas opiniões. Mas como generalizações estão seriamente distorcidas. Muitos Australianos, especialmente nos media, falharam – ou não quiseram – reconhecer as alargadas melhorias nos padrões de vida dos Indonésios desde meados de 1960s, no seio quer de grupos socio-económicos quer das regiões dos extremos.

Os Australianos têm também a tendência de prestar pouca atenção a sensibilidades profundas históricas e culturais. Nunca tendo sido uma colónia que tenha sofrido a pobreza, nunca tendo sido invadida por um poder estrangeiro e nunca tendo tido de lutar numa guerra de independência prolongada e sangrenta, a maioria dos Australianos não têm a perspectiva histórica para entender a sensibilidade Indonésia em questões chave.

O queimar de bandeiras, por exemplo, levanta poucas paixões na Austrália, contudo para a maioria dos Indonésios é uma acção altamente provocatória.

Com uma Independência duramente conquistada apenas há duas gerações, para muitos Indonésios é altamente chocante a destruição e a difamação de símbolos nacionais por um vizinho.

O facto dos Australianos serem predominantemente ricos e brancos, e culturalmente dispostos a expressar a opinião sem papas no exterior –espelhando o estilo do debate doméstico – ainda mais complicou a questão. Essas mas interpretações trabalharam nas duas direcções, contudo. É verdade que a Austrália manteve uma política de discriminação na imigração até cerca de 1970 (a chamada 'Política da Austrália Branca'), e que nos primeiros 180 anos de instalação Europeia foi desgraçado o tratamento do povo aborígene.

Mas as coisas mudaram muito na Austrália nos últimos 30 anos. Agora a Austrália tem um programa aberto, non-discriminatório de imigração, igualado por muitos poucos países.

A resultante transformação da sociedade foi rápida e a Austrália é sem dúvida uma das sociedades mais vibrantes e multi-culturais do mundo.

O seu programa generoso de refugiados tem poucos paralelos, certamente nesta região. É verdade que este 'multiracialismo tem sido fortemente criticado em casa – o factor 'Pauline Hanson.

Mas o programa de imigração continua a atrair apoio político bi-partidário. O partido Uma Nação agora está em declínio e nunca captou votos numa escala comparável a partidos similares nos USA e na Europa.

É também verdade que a comunidade aborígene da Austrália (num número de cerca de 250,000 pessoas) têm padrões de baixo nível de vida inaceitáveis. Mas há muitos programas de 'discriminação positiva' e os problemas da comunidade são abertamente reconhecidos e debatidos dentro e fora do governo.

Em adição, a Austrália continua a ser um dos maiores dadores da Indonésia, incluindo um programa de bolsas de estudo generoso. Apoiou fortemente o apoio financeiro internacional no início da crise económica e apesar da austeridade fiscal em casa, o valor real da ajuda tem sido largamente mantida.

O rendimento per capita da Austrália está agora abaixo quer de Singapura quer de Hong Kong, e nenhum deles dá ajuda à Indonésia.

A imprensa Australiana é muitas vezes vista como um factor de complicação nas relações bilaterais. É fácil de entender a raiva dos Indonésios aqui: em tempos recentes, a entrevista na televisão extraordinariamente rude e mal-informada com o embaixador Indonésio num canal comercial e a equipa dos 60 Minutos a caminhar grosseiramente num 'campo de minas' ao perguntar aos Timorenses em fila como é que eles iriam votar no referendo.

Mais geralmente, muitos jornalistas Australianos, com o seu foco apenas em direitos humanos, Timor-Leste e corrupção, falharam tristemente em dar uma imagem equilibrada da complexidade da Indonésia.

Não há dúvida que, certo ou errado, o assassínio dos cinco jornalistas em Balibo no final de 1975 contribuiu para a hostilidade da imprensa em relação à Indonésia. Mas, enquanto o espanto dos Indonésios é bastante compreensível, também aqui a questão não se resolve com generalizações abrangentes. Tem havido alguns bons jornalistas Australianos na Indonésia, particularmente na imprensa.

Às vezes o controlo de mão pesada da imprensa da Indonésia antagonizou sem necessidade a imprensa estrangeira (e obviamente a doméstica). E os problemas com a imprensa Australiana cresceram em parte da proximidade e da familiaridade.

O The New York Times, o Guardian de Londres, os jornais Holandeses, a BBC e a CNN têm sido muitas vezes tão críticos quanto as publicações Australianas. Mas por não haver tantos, e não noticiam tantas vezes, as tensões não foram tão grandes.

Os autores são respectivamente professor de economia e responsável do Indonesia Project, Research School of Pacific Studies and Asian Studies, e Asia-Pacific School of Economics and Management, the Australian National University.

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.