sexta-feira, novembro 09, 2007

Book Reviews: Shakedown: Australia's Grab for Timor Oil

Far Eastern Economic Review - November 2007

by Paul Cleary
Allen & Unwin Academic, 336 pages, $19.95

Reviewed by Jeff Kingston

In late 2006 while walking home one starry night, stupidly ignoring warnings about the dangers on Dili's streets after dark, I was accosted by several youths who asked in menacing tones if I was Australian. I set them straight and they let me pass, making me wonder just how many places in the world these days it is better to be an American than from Down Under….not many I suppose.

So how did things go so wrong for Australia, erstwhile savior of East Timor? After all, Australian troops were the first to arrive after the Indonesian military and their militia thugs laid waste to Dili in 1999-just after the courageous vote for independence by U.N.-administered referendum. Since then, Australia has been at the forefront of nations seeking to rebuild East Timor with generous assistance and the commitment of much needed security personnel. Paul Cleary helps us understand why a nation that has given so much inspires more resentment than gratitude. The Australian government's checkered record on East Timor-a case of greed trumping principle-causes many Timorese (and Australians) to feel an acute sense of betrayal.

Certainly this sordid chapter in Australian diplomacy is one that Canberra's diplomats will rue, but it should be required reading for new recruits so that they can learn the folly of arrogance, duplicity and hypocrisy. East Timor, the first nation born in the 21st century, is one of the poorest nations in the world and has been plagued by a host of problems as it emerges from 24 years of brutal Indonesian occupation from 1975-1999. Mr. Cleary makes a compelling case that Australia, its wealthy and powerful neighbor, has much to answer for by trying to plunder Timor's oil and gas resources and deny this impoverished nation its rightful revenues.

Bullying Australian diplomats were determined to seal a deal that would leave East Timor destitute and dependent on external assistance. The resource curse-the sudden gushing of revenues that get squandered or pocketed-has long plagued developing nations and many have little to show for their windfall. Perhaps Team Australia was trying to help East Timor solve the paradox of plenty by robbing them of their resources.

Shakedown details the extortionate tactics that Australian diplomats deployed to deny East Timor its legal share of oil and gas resources in the seabed of the Timor Sea that divides the two countries. Mr. Cleary takes us back to the decision by Canberra to recognize Indonesian sovereignty over East Timor back in 1978.

After Indonesian troops invaded in 1975, Richard Wolcott, then ambassador to Indonesia, advised then Prime Minister Gough Whitlam that a better deal for seabed resources could be struck with Indonesia than an independent government, helping explain why Australia was the only Western nation to recognize Indonesian sovereignty over East Timor. Canberra managed to cut an extremely favorable deal with Jakarta, a shady quid pro quo that did little to burnish Australian honor.

East Timor's leaders, however, made it clear early on in the negotiations that began in 2001 that it was not going to allow Australia to profit from this criminal deal with its former occupier. As an advisor to the East Timor government, Mr. Cleary gives us an insider's account of the negotiations, providing some lessons about maritime law and a tutorial on cupidity. A former journalist, the Australian author does not let the technical details overwhelm a contemporary David-versus-Goliath tale. He sketches the personalities that shaped the negotiations and shares fascinating anecdotes that breathe life into the "smoked-filled rooms."

In 2005, after four years of acrimonious negotiations, a partial agreement was struck on one of the large oil fields, Greater Sunrise, that gave East Timor 50% of the revenues, the minimum Dili could accept and the maximum Canberra could abide. Part of this creative agreement involved postponing settlement of the maritime boundary in the Timor Gap for 50 years. Much credit for rescuing the negotiations goes to then Foreign Minister and current President Jose Ramos-Horta, a Nobel laureate with considerable diplomatic savvy and a far less abrasive style than then Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri.

The villains in this unseemly tale constitute a who's who of Australian politics. From Mr. Whitlam to John Howard, Australian leaders have been unapologetic about their oil grab. Foreign ministers from Andrew Peacock to Alexander Downer have also staunchly asserted the national interest to cover the ignominy of official policy.

Mr. Downer proved both obdurate and puerile, issuing ultimatums, slamming tables and threatening to prevent any exploitation of the resources unless Australia got its way. He also cut funding to Timorese NGOs that criticized Australia, undoubtedly a valuable civics lesson. In order to protect against arbitration that would most likely favor East Timor's claims, the Howard government also withdrew from dispute settlement procedures under the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea and rescinded recognition of the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice for maritime disputes.

Upon finishing this fine book the reader is left wondering why so many of the best and brightest acted so dishonorably in support of a policy that undermined the national interest by tarnishing Australia's moral stature. What did they seek to "win" at the expense of a desperately needy neighbor?

One of the prominent non-Australian actors who does not emerge particularly well from this tale is Peter Galbraith, a renowned diplomat and writer, who also happens to be the son of John Kenneth Galbraith, the illustrious economist and presidential adviser. He is described as loud and proud, abrasively American even to his fellow countrymen. Working out of the United Nations on behalf of the East Timor team, Galbraith's blustering ways antagonized the Australian negotiators, but imparted a needed bravado to the inexperienced and outgunned Timorese. However, as the discussions dragged on, he is portrayed as being overeager to accept a buyout, pressuring the Timorese to accept a $3 billion cash settlement that in retrospect would have been a very bad deal. By sticking to their principles and standing up for their legal entitlements, the Timorese ended up with a far more lucrative arrangement that enables them to share in the upside of surging energy prices. So much for hotshot consultants.

Mr. Cleary also presents a mixed portrait of former Prime Minister Mr. Alkatiri, a man he knows well from working closely together. In the negotiations Mr. Alkatiri remained steadfast in refusing to cave in to the threats and tactics of Team Australia. He was confident that international law was on David's side and that ultimately this would force Goliath to bend. His brinksmanship and resolute negotiating stance made him few fans among the Australian officials and he remains convinced today that enemies he made in standing up for East Timor's resource rights conspired against him and engineered his downfall.

Mr. Alkatiri resigned in disgrace in June 2006 due to allegations about his role in arming hit squads and for mishandling a crisis within the military ranks. The military dissension morphed into looting, arson and violence on the streets of Dili, displacing some 15% of the population, many of whom still live in temporary shelters. Mr. Cleary suggests that Australia is partly to blame for the unrest, but also takes Mr. Alkatiri to task for his authoritarian tendencies and nepotism. His party, Fretilin, did poorly in the 2007 elections, an outcome that Mr. Cleary seems to anticipate. In the chapter entitled "Animal Farm," he describes the formerly dominant party in Orwellian terms and gives it poor marks for governance.

One of the more interesting angles in this story is the role of civil society organizations in Australia and the improbable heroics of a Melbourne-based optometry baron, Ian Melrose. He became engaged upon seeing a program concerning the health problems of Timorese children and outraged by his government's larcenous diplomacy. He funded an ad campaign that aroused public opinion against official policy, appealing to the deep-rooted sense of fair play among Aussies and shaming the government for trying to fleece its poor neighbor. NGOs mounted a spirited campaign and the media raised the heat on the Howard government, contributing in no small part to the compromise settlement. The dignified Australian public understood common decency even when their government could not.

- Mr. Kingston is director of Asian studies at Temple University's Japan campus.

TRADUÇÃO:

Crítica de Livros: Usura: Sequestro pela Austrália do Petróleo de Timor

Far Eastern Economic Review - Novembro 2007

por Paul Cleary
Allen & Unwin Academic, 336 pages, $19.95

Crítica de Jeff Kingston

Nos finais de 2006 quando ia para casa numa noite escura, ignorando estupidamente os avisos sobre os perigos das ruas de Dili à noite, fui abordado por vários jovens que me perguntaram com voz ameaçadora se era Australiano. Respondi-lhes directamente e deixaram-me passar, fazendo-me perguntar a mim próprio em quantos lugares do mundo nestes dias é melhor ser Americano do que de lá debaixo ….não muitos, calculo.

Assim como é que as coisas se viraram tão mal para Austrália, antes tida como a salvadora de Timor-Leste? No fim de contas, as tropas Australianas foram as primeiras a chegar depois dos militares Indonésios e dos seus bandos de milícias terem lançado a ruína em Dili em 1999 imediatamente depois da votação corajosa pela independência no referendo organizado pela ONU. Desde então, a Austrália tem estado na linha da frente das nações que procuram reconstruir Timor-Leste com assistência generosa e a presença do muito necessário pessoal de segurança. Paul Cleary ajuda-nos a entender porque é a uma nação a quem tanto foi dado inspira mais ressentimento do que gratidão. A história colorida do governo Australiano sobre Timor-Leste - um caso de avareza sobre princípios- leva a que muitos Timorenses (e Australianos) sintam um sentimento agudo de traição.

Certamente este capítulo sórdido da diplomacia Australiana é um daqueles que os diplomatas de Canberra lastimarão, mas deve ser de leitura obrigatória para os novos recrutados para que possam aprender a estupidez da arrogância, duplicidade e hipocrisia. Timor-Leste, a primeira nação a nascer no século 21, é uma das nações mais pobres do mundo e foi atingida por uma série de problemas quando emergiu de 24 anos de brutal ocupação Indonésia de 1975-1999. O Sr. Cleary torna um caso convincente que a Austrália, o seu rico e poderoso vizinho, tem muito a responder por tentar pilhar os recursos do gás e do petróleo de Timor e negar a esta nação empobrecida os rendimentos a que tem direito.

Ameaçadores diplomatas Australianos estavam determinados a selar um acordo que deixaria Timor-Leste destituído e dependente de assistência externa. A maldição dos recursos – a súbita entrada de rendimentos que foram gastos ou metidos na algibeira – tem à muito atingido nações em vias de desenvolvimento e muitas têm pouco para mostrar depois de acabadas. Talvez que a Equipa Austrália estivesse a ajudar Timor-Leste a resolver o paradoxo da abundância roubando-lhes os seus recursos.

Usura detalha as tácticas de extorsão que os diplomatas Australianos usaram para negar a Timor-Leste a sua parte legal dos recursos do petróleo e do gás no leito do mar do Mar de Timor que está entre os dois países. O Sr. Cleary leva-nos ao tempo da decisão de Canberra de reconhecimento da soberania Indonésia sobre Timor-Leste em 1978.

Depois das tropas Indonésias terem invadido Timor em 1975, Richard Wolcott, então o embaixador na Indonésia, aconselhou o então Primeiro-Ministro Gough Whitlam que se podia fazer um acordo melhor para os recursos do fundo do mar com a Indonésia do que com um governo independente, o que ajuda a explicar porque é que a Austrália foi a única nação Ocidental a reconhecer a soberania Indonésia sobre Timor-Leste. Canberra conseguiu estabelecer um acordo extremamente favorável com Jacarta, um sombrio quid pro quo que pouco fez para polir a honra Australiana.

Os líderes de Timor-Leste, contudo, deixaram claro logo no princípio das negociações que começaram em 2001 que não iam deixar que a Austrália beneficiasse deste acordo criminoso com o seu antigo ocupante. Sendo um conselheiro do governo de Timor-Leste, o Sr. Cleary dá-nos um relato do interior das negociações, dando algumas lições sobre lei marítima e uma lição sobre cobiça. Antigo jornalista, o autor Australiano não deixa que os detalhes técnicos se sobreponham a uma história a contemporânea de David-versus-Golias. Desenha as personalidades que marcaram as negociações e partilha anedotas fascinantes que trazem vida aos "salões cheios de fumo."

Em 2005, depois de quarto anos de negociações às peras, foi obtido um acordo parcial sobre um dos maiores campos de petróleo, Greater Sunrise, que deu a Timor-Leste 50% dos rendimentos, o mínimo que Dili podia aceitar e o máximo em que Canberra podia largar. Parte deste criativo acordo envolveu adiar a decisão sobre a fronteira marítima no Timor Gap durante 50 anos. Muito do crédito para salvar as negociações vai para o então Ministro dos Estrangeiros e corrente Presidente José Ramos-Horta, um laureado do Nobel com consideráveis habilidades diplomáticas e com um estilo menos abrasivo do que o então Primeiro-Ministro Mari Alkatiri.

Os vilãos desta história inconveniente constituem um quem é quem dos políticos Australianos. Desde o Sr. Whitlam até John Howard, os líderes Australianos não têm tido desculpa com a sua cobiça pelo petróleo. Ministros dos Estrangeiros desde Andrew Peacock até Alexander Downer têm também invocado com determinação o interesse nacional para tapar a ignomínia da política oficial.

O Sr. Downer provou ser obstinado e pueril, emitindo ultimatos, batendo nas mesas e ameaçando impedir qualquer exploração dos recursos a não ser que a Austrália levasse a sua avante Cortou também fundos a ONG’s Timorenses que criticaram a Austrália, sem dúvida uma valiosa lição de civismo. De modo a proteger-se contra o regulador que provavelmente iria favorecer as reclamações de Timor-Leste, o governo de Howard retirou-se também do procedimento para resolver disputas sob o Tribunal Internacional para a Lei do Mar e deixou de reconhecer a jurisdição do Tribunal Internacional da Justiça para as disputas marítimas.

Ao acabar de ler este livro bom o leitor fica a imaginar porque é tantos dos melhores e mais brilhantes actuaram tão desonestamente a apoiar uma política que minou o interesse nacional ao manchar a estatura moral da Austrália. O que é que tentaram "ganhar" às custas de um vizinho desesperadamente necessitado?

Um dos mais proeminentes actors não-Australianos que não emerge particularmente bem desta história é Peter Galbraith, um conhecido diplomata e escritor, que acontecer ser também filho de John Kenneth Galbraith, o famoso economista e conselheiro presidencial. É descrito como orgulhoso e de voz grossa, abrasivamente Americano mesmo pelos seus colegas cidadãos. A trabalhar para as Nações Unidas em nome da equipa de Timor-Leste, os modos grosseiros de Galbraith trouxeram-lhe conflitos com os negociadores Australianos, mas transmitiram uma bravura necessária aos Timorenses inexperientes e menos certeiros. Contudo, quando as discussões se arrastavam ele é retratado como desejoso de aceitar um compromisso, fazendo pressão sobre os Timorenses para aceitarem um acordo por $3 biliões que em retro-expectativa teria sido um muito mau acordo. Ao se fixarem nos seus princípios e ao defenderem o seu direito legal, os Timorenses acabaram por conseguir um arranjo muito mais lucrativo que lhes permite partilhar a parte superior dos preços da energia que estão a emergir. Basta de conselheiros de cabeça esquentada.

O Sr. Cleary apresenta ainda um retrato misto do antigo Primeiro-Ministro Sr. Alkatiri, um homem que ele conhece bem por terem trabalhado de perto juntos. Nas negociações o Sr. Alkatiri manteve-se firme nas recusas de ceder às ameaças e tácticas da Equipa Austrália. Estava confiante que a lei internacional estava do lado de David e que isto acabaria no fim de forçar o Golias a ceder. A sua capacidade e postura negocial determinada deixou-lhe poucos fãs entre os funcionários Australianos e está convencido hoje que foram os inimigos que fez ao defender os direitos de Timor-Leste aos recursos que conspiraram contra ele e manobraram a sua queda.

O Sr. Alkatiri resignou em desgraça em Junho de 2006 devido a alegações sobre o seu papel em armar esquadrões de ataque e por má gestão da crise nas fileiras militares. A dissidência militar transformou-se em pilhagens, ataques incendiários e violência nas ruas de Dili, deslocando cerca de 15% da população, muita da qual está ainda a viver em abrigos temporários. O Sr. Cleary sugere que a Austrália tem parte da culpa do desassossego, mas culpa também o Sr. Alkatiri pelas suas tendências autoritárias e nepotismo. O seu partido, a Fretilin, teve resultados pobres mas eleições de 2007, um resultado que o Sr. Cleary parece antecipar. No capítulo com o título "Quinta dos Animais," descreve o anteriormente partido dominante em termos Orwellianos e dá notas fracas à sua governação.

Um dos ângulos mais interessantes desta história é o papel das organizações da sociedade civil na Austrália e a improvável heroicidade de um barão da optometria com base em Melbourne, Ian Melrose. Ele engajou-se ao ver um programa sobre problemas de saúde de crianças Timorenses e indignado pela diplomacia vergonhosa do seu país. Financiou uma campanha que levantou a opinião pública contra a política oficial, apelando ao sentido bem enraizado de desportivismo dos Australianos e envergonhando o governo por tentar espoliar o seu vizinho. As ONG’s montaram uma inspirada campanha e os media fizeram fogo contra o governo de Howard, contribuindo bastante para uma solução de compromisso. A digna população Australian entendeu a decência comum mesmo quando o seu governo não conseguiu.

- O Sr. Kingston é director dos estudos Asiáticos na Temple University's Japan campus.

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Crítica de Livros: Usura: Sequestro pela Austrália do Petróleo de Timor
Far Eastern Economic Review - Novembro 2007

por Paul Cleary
Allen & Unwin Academic, 336 pages, $19.95

Crítica de Jeff Kingston

Nos finais de 2006 quando ia para casa numa noite escura, ignorando estupidamente os avisos sobre os perigos das ruas de Dili à noite, fui abordado por vários jovens que me perguntaram com voz ameaçadora se era Australiano. Respondi-lhes directamente e deixaram-me passar, fazendo-me perguntar a mim próprio em quantos lugares do mundo nestes dias é melhor ser Americano do que de lá debaixo ….não muitos, calculo.

Assim como é que as coisas se viraram tão mal para Austrália, antes tida como a salvadora de Timor-Leste? No fim de contas, as tropas Australianas foram as primeiras a chegar depois dos militares Indonésios e dos seus bandos de milícias terem lançado a ruína em Dili em 1999 imediatamente depois da votação corajosa pela independência no referendo organizado pela ONU. Desde então, a Austrália tem estado na linha da frente das nações que procuram reconstruir Timor-Leste com assistência generosa e a presença do muito necessário pessoal de segurança. Paul Cleary ajuda-nos a entender porque é a uma nação a quem tanto foi dado inspira mais ressentimento do que gratidão. A história colorida do governo Australiano sobre Timor-Leste - um caso de avareza sobre princípios- leva a que muitos Timorenses (e Australianos) sintam um sentimento agudo de traição.

Certamente este capítulo sórdido da diplomacia Australiana é um daqueles que os diplomatas de Canberra lastimarão, mas deve ser de leitura obrigatória para os novos recrutados para que possam aprender a estupidez da arrogância, duplicidade e hipocrisia. Timor-Leste, a primeira nação a nascer no século 21, é uma das nações mais pobres do mundo e foi atingida por uma série de problemas quando emergiu de 24 anos de brutal ocupação Indonésia de 1975-1999. O Sr. Cleary torna um caso convincente que a Austrália, o seu rico e poderoso vizinho, tem muito a responder por tentar pilhar os recursos do gás e do petróleo de Timor e negar a esta nação empobrecida os rendimentos a que tem direito.

Ameaçadores diplomatas Australianos estavam determinados a selar um acordo que deixaria Timor-Leste destituído e dependente de assistência externa. A maldição dos recursos – a súbita entrada de rendimentos que foram gastos ou metidos na algibeira – tem à muito atingido nações em vias de desenvolvimento e muitas têm pouco para mostrar depois de acabadas. Talvez que a Equipa Austrália estivesse a ajudar Timor-Leste a resolver o paradoxo da abundância roubando-lhes os seus recursos.

Usura detalha as tácticas de extorsão que os diplomatas Australianos usaram para negar a Timor-Leste a sua parte legal dos recursos do petróleo e do gás no leito do mar do Mar de Timor que está entre os dois países. O Sr. Cleary leva-nos ao tempo da decisão de Canberra de reconhecimento da soberania Indonésia sobre Timor-Leste em 1978.

Depois das tropas Indonésias terem invadido Timor em 1975, Richard Wolcott, então o embaixador na Indonésia, aconselhou o então Primeiro-Ministro Gough Whitlam que se podia fazer um acordo melhor para os recursos do fundo do mar com a Indonésia do que com um governo independente, o que ajuda a explicar porque é que a Austrália foi a única nação Ocidental a reconhecer a soberania Indonésia sobre Timor-Leste. Canberra conseguiu estabelecer um acordo extremamente favorável com Jacarta, um sombrio quid pro quo que pouco fez para polir a honra Australiana.

Os líderes de Timor-Leste, contudo, deixaram claro logo no princípio das negociações que começaram em 2001 que não iam deixar que a Austrália beneficiasse deste acordo criminoso com o seu antigo ocupante. Sendo um conselheiro do governo de Timor-Leste, o Sr. Cleary dá-nos um relato do interior das negociações, dando algumas lições sobre lei marítima e uma lição sobre cobiça. Antigo jornalista, o autor Australiano não deixa que os detalhes técnicos se sobreponham a uma história a contemporânea de David-versus-Golias. Desenha as personalidades que marcaram as negociações e partilha anedotas fascinantes que trazem vida aos "salões cheios de fumo."

Em 2005, depois de quarto anos de negociações às peras, foi obtido um acordo parcial sobre um dos maiores campos de petróleo, Greater Sunrise, que deu a Timor-Leste 50% dos rendimentos, o mínimo que Dili podia aceitar e o máximo em que Canberra podia largar. Parte deste criativo acordo envolveu adiar a decisão sobre a fronteira marítima no Timor Gap durante 50 anos. Muito do crédito para salvar as negociações vai para o então Ministro dos Estrangeiros e corrente Presidente José Ramos-Horta, um laureado do Nobel com consideráveis habilidades diplomáticas e com um estilo menos abrasivo do que o então Primeiro-Ministro Mari Alkatiri.

Os vilãos desta história inconveniente constituem um quem é quem dos políticos Australianos. Desde o Sr. Whitlam até John Howard, os líderes Australianos não têm tido desculpa com a sua cobiça pelo petróleo. Ministros dos Estrangeiros desde Andrew Peacock até Alexander Downer têm também invocado com determinação o interesse nacional para tapar a ignomínia da política oficial.

O Sr. Downer provou ser obstinado e pueril, emitindo ultimatos, batendo nas mesas e ameaçando impedir qualquer exploração dos recursos a não ser que a Austrália levasse a sua avante Cortou também fundos a ONG’s Timorenses que criticaram a Austrália, sem dúvida uma valiosa lição de civismo. De modo a proteger-se contra o regulador que provavelmente iria favorecer as reclamações de Timor-Leste, o governo de Howard retirou-se também do procedimento para resolver disputas sob o Tribunal Internacional para a Lei do Mar e deixou de reconhecer a jurisdição do Tribunal Internacional da Justiça para as disputas marítimas.

Ao acabar de ler este livro bom o leitor fica a imaginar porque é tantos dos melhores e mais brilhantes actuaram tão desonestamente a apoiar uma política que minou o interesse nacional ao manchar a estatura moral da Austrália. O que é que tentaram "ganhar" às custas de um vizinho desesperadamente necessitado?

Um dos mais proeminentes actors não-Australianos que não emerge particularmente bem desta história é Peter Galbraith, um conhecido diplomata e escritor, que acontecer ser também filho de John Kenneth Galbraith, o famoso economista e conselheiro presidencial. É descrito como orgulhoso e de voz grossa, abrasivamente Americano mesmo pelos seus colegas cidadãos. A trabalhar para as Nações Unidas em nome da equipa de Timor-Leste, os modos grosseiros de Galbraith trouxeram-lhe conflitos com os negociadores Australianos, mas transmitiram uma bravura necessária aos Timorenses inexperientes e menos certeiros. Contudo, quando as discussões se arrastavam ele é retratado como desejoso de aceitar um compromisso, fazendo pressão sobre os Timorenses para aceitarem um acordo por $3 biliões que em retro-expectativa teria sido um muito mau acordo. Ao se fixarem nos seus princípios e ao defenderem o seu direito legal, os Timorenses acabaram por conseguir um arranjo muito mais lucrativo que lhes permite partilhar a parte superior dos preços da energia que estão a emergir. Basta de conselheiros de cabeça esquentada.

O Sr. Cleary apresenta ainda um retrato misto do antigo Primeiro-Ministro Sr. Alkatiri, um homem que ele conhece bem por terem trabalhado de perto juntos. Nas negociações o Sr. Alkatiri manteve-se firme nas recusas de ceder às ameaças e tácticas da Equipa Austrália. Estava confiante que a lei internacional estava do lado de David e que isto acabaria no fim de forçar o Golias a ceder. A sua capacidade e postura negocial determinada deixou-lhe poucos fãs entre os funcionários Australianos e está convencido hoje que foram os inimigos que fez ao defender os direitos de Timor-Leste aos recursos que conspiraram contra ele e manobraram a sua queda.

O Sr. Alkatiri resignou em desgraça em Junho de 2006 devido a alegações sobre o seu papel em armar esquadrões de ataque e por má gestão da crise nas fileiras militares. A dissidência militar transformou-se em pilhagens, ataques incendiários e violência nas ruas de Dili, deslocando cerca de 15% da população, muita da qual está ainda a viver em abrigos temporários. O Sr. Cleary sugere que a Austrália tem parte da culpa do desassossego, mas culpa também o Sr. Alkatiri pelas suas tendências autoritárias e nepotismo. O seu partido, a Fretilin, teve resultados pobres mas eleições de 2007, um resultado que o Sr. Cleary parece antecipar. No capítulo com o título "Quinta dos Animais," descreve o anteriormente partido dominante em termos Orwellianos e dá notas fracas à sua governação.

Um dos ângulos mais interessantes desta história é o papel das organizações da sociedade civil na Austrália e a improvável heroicidade de um barão da optometria com base em Melbourne, Ian Melrose. Ele engajou-se ao ver um programa sobre problemas de saúde de crianças Timorenses e indignado pela diplomacia vergonhosa do seu país. Financiou uma campanha que levantou a opinião pública contra a política oficial, apelando ao sentido bem enraizado de desportivismo dos Australianos e envergonhando o governo por tentar espoliar o seu vizinho. As ONG’s montaram uma inspirada campanha e os media fizeram fogo contra o governo de Howard, contribuindo bastante para uma solução de compromisso. A digna população Australian entendeu a decência comum mesmo quando o seu governo não conseguiu.

- O Sr. Kingston é director dos estudos Asiáticos na Temple University's Japan campus.

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.