terça-feira, abril 01, 2008

Timor-Leste's displacement crisis

International Crisis Group
Date: 31 Mar 2008

Asia Report N°148

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The shooting of President José Ramos-Horta in February 2008 underscored the urgency of addressing sources of conflict and violence in Timor-Leste. The unresolved displacement crisis is one of the important problems, both a consequence of past conflict and a potential source of future trouble. Nearly two years after the country descended into civil conflict in April 2006, more than 100,000 people remain displaced. Successive governments and their international partners have failed to bring about the conditions in which they might return home or to prevent further waves of displacements. The new government's national recovery strategy needs to be properly funded and accompanied by a number of other crucial elements, most significantly the creation of a fair and functioning land and property regime, an increase in overall housing stock, an end to the cycle of impunity and reform of the justice and security sectors.

With 30,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) living in camps in the capital, Dili, the displaced are highly visible evidence of the failure to provide security and enforce the rule of law. As well as a humanitarian tragedy, they are a conflict risk in their own right. The 70,000 living outside camps, with families and friends, may be less visible but are a significant burden on their hosts.
Four main obstacles prevent the IDPs from going home. First, many continue to fear further violence from their neighbours and do not trust the security forces to guarantee their safety.

This needs to be tackled by speeding up security sector reform, including prioritising community policing; prosecuting arsonists and violent criminals; and promoting a process of local and national dialogue and reconciliation. Still, in some cases, it will not be possible for people to return to their original community, and alternatives will need to be provided.

The attacks on 11 February 2008 on President Ramos-Horta and Prime Minister Xanana Gusmão, which left the former seriously injured, showed why many people fear further violence.

However, the death of rebel leader Alfredo Reinado may help reduce fear, particularly if his remaining fighters can be dealt with. His death has not sparked the unrest among his urban supporters and sympathisers that many predicted, though there is still potential for trouble after the curfew and state of siege are lifted. But Reinado was a manifestation, not the cause, of Timor's divisions. The government needs to address fundamental drivers of conflict, such as communal tensions, problems within the security forces and lack of economic opportunities – before the next Reinado appears.

Secondly, the provision of free food and shelter makes life in a camp in some respects more attractive than the alternatives. A further factor that makes IDPs from the countryside reluctant to leave the camps in Dili is that the capital offers many more economic opportunities.

Thirdly, some of the camps are in effect run by individuals and groups that have vested interests in keeping numbers high, either because they control the black market for reselling food aid or because they believe greater numbers give them more political weight. In a few instances, they have intimidated or prevented people from leaving.

Finally, many displaced do not have homes to go back to. Destroyed or damaged houses have not been rebuilt, and others are subject to ownership disputes that cannot be settled under Timor-Leste's incomplete and inadequate system of land law. More generally, housing stock is simply not sufficient for the country's population. Unless more houses are built and systems introduced for resolving ownership disputes and providing secure tenure, the sheer demand for homes will continue to be an impediment to resettling displaced persons and a driver for further displacements.

Little beyond humanitarian aid was done in 2006-2007 to address the displacement crisis, but the government that assumed office in August 2007 has a more vigorous approach. It is phasing out universal food distribution in the camps and has not backed down despite protests and fears of unrest after Reinado's death. It now is moving on a government-wide plan – the national recovery strategy – which addresses many, though not all, aspects of the problem. Some senior officials still retain unrealistic expectations about the ease and speed with which IDPs can be induced to go home. However, the government as a whole is beginning to understand the complexity and is planning on a more realistic multi-year basis.

While the new national recovery strategy contains many of the elements needed for reintegrating IDPs into their communities or, where not possible, moving them into new homes, the government has not allocated sufficient resources to it. Only the first pillar – rebuilding houses – is funded in the 2008 budget, and that inadequately. No money has been provided for the equally important non-infrastructure elements, such as bolstering security, livelihood support, reconciliation and social safety nets.

The strategy also does not address options for rebuilding those properties – the majority – that are the subject of ownership disputes. Timor badly needs new land laws, a land register, a system for issuing titles, and mediation and dispute-resolution mechanisms. Most land ownership records were destroyed in 1999, and many people never had them in the first place; there are also conflicts between traditional, Portuguese and Indonesian land regimes. These problems underlie many displacements – people took advantage of the 2006 chaos to chase neighbours out of disputed properties – and risk undermining long-term stability and economic growth. Draft land laws exist, but successive governments have considered them too controversial. They need to be passed but, important as it is, land law reform will take time and alternative ways are needed to house IDPs whose houses are the subject of ownership disputes.
Implementation of the recovery strategy should be a properly funded priority for all ministries concerned. While the government needs some donor and international financial institution help, Timor-Leste has the resources to cover more of the shortfalls for IDP programs in its 2008 budget itself and should do so. All parties need to recognise that the longer they let the problem fester, the harder it will be to resolve it and the greater the chance that it will lead to yet more violence.

RECOMMENDATIONS

To the Timor-Leste Government:

1. Publicise and explain the Hamutuk Hari'i Futuru national recovery strategy fully to IDPs and receiving communities, emphasising that it is the best and final package for returnees and that those who do not accept it may miss out.

2. Cost those elements in the strategy which are currently unfunded and use the mid-term budget review to ensure each pillar of the strategy, and each line ministry, is allocated at least some funding from central government resources, with the balance made up from international concessional lending and external donor support.

3. Restart the social solidarity ministry's dialogue processes, focusing on communities where violence displaced large numbers of people, to encourage them to accept IDP returns and allocate additional resources to the ministry for this purpose.

4. Disseminate and adopt the recommendations of the Commission of Reception, Truth and Reconciliation's Chega! (Enough!) report, as a contribution to national dialogue and reconciliation.
5. Bring those primarily responsible for the 2006 violence, including arsonists, to justice and ensure that the crime of arson is treated seriously by the justice system.

6. Accelerate the process of security sector reform, giving priority to community policing and protection of vulnerable persons, while increasing the police presence in troubled parts of Dili and patrolling regularly in the camps and in communities to which IDPs return.

7. End universal food distribution in the camps and, with the assistance of donors and others, carry out a thorough assessment of vulnerable people and groups both within and outside camps to assist the setting up of effective social support mechanisms.

8. Develop programs, in cooperation with donors, to create more employment opportunities outside Dili and focus not only on short-term jobs, but also on creating permanent livelihood opportunities with a strong emphasis on the needs of women.

9. Develop a functioning land and property regime, including by:

(a) passing the land laws drafted by the justice ministry in 2004 to replace the current unsatisfactory mix of Indonesian, UN and post-independence legislation;

(b) prioritising creation of a land register and a land title system;

(c) creating mediation and dispute-resolution mechanisms with enforcement powers; and

(d) providing adequate resources to deal with the large number of disputes, as well as tenure issues that particularly afflict women.

10. Implement the 2004 National Housing Strategy, so as to ease the general housing shortage that underlies many individual displacements.

11. Accept that the people who have been displaced are and will remain Dili residents, make plans to provide housing and basic services for the capital's growing population and replace the Dili Urban Plan with a new one that has input from all stakeholders and reflects the city's actual size and circumstances.

12. Do contingency planning for future displacement crises, including those resulting from natural disasters, by:

(a) identifying suitable sites for camps; and

(b) developing the government's disaster management and response capabilities, under the leadership of the prime minister's or vice prime minister's office.

To the UN Mission (UNMIT), Development Partners and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs):

13. Support the government in implementing the national recovery strategy, including by encouraging the international financial institutions to make concessional loans available for infrastructure and job creation, and by providing additional funding to top up the government's own allocations for the other elements.

14. Require all requests for assistance to the national recovery strategy to come through one government body, such as the office of the vice prime minister.

15. Encourage the government to give attention to all five elements of the strategy, and to crucial areas not covered by the strategy, including ending impunity for the 2006 violence, new land laws, a land register, a title system for issuing titles, and mediation and dispute-resolution mechanisms, and offer technical support in areas such as disaster management, urban planning and land administration.

Dili/Brussels, 31 March 2008

Tradução:

Crise de deslocação de Timor-Leste

International Crisis Group
Date: 31 Mar 2008

Asia Report N°148

RESUMO E RECOMENDAÇÕES

Os disparos contra o Presidente José Ramos-Horta em Fevereiro de 2008 sublinham a urgência de se responder às fontes do conflito e da violência em Timor-Leste. A crise de deslocação não resolvida é um dos problemas importantes, e simultaneamente uma consequência do último conflito e uma fonte potencial de problemas futuros. Quase dois anos depois do país ter caído em conflito civil em Abril 2006, mais de 100,000 pessoas continuam deslocadas. Governos sucessivos e os seus parceiros internacionais falharam em arranjar as condições por meio das quais eles podiam voltar a casa ou em prevenir mais vagas de deslocações. A estratégia de recuperação nacional do novo governo precisa de ser devidamente financiada e acompanhada por um número de outros elementos cruciais, sendo o mais significativo a criação dum regime de terras e propriedades justo e funcional um aumento em geral de uma bolsa de habitações e pôr fim ao ciclo de impunidade e reformar os sectores de justiça e de segurança.

Com 30,000 deslocados a viverem em campos na capital, Dili, os deslocados são uma evidência altamente visível do falhanço em providenciar segurança e aplicar o domínio da lei. Tanto quanto uma tragédia humanitária, são em si mesmo um risco de conflito. Os 70,000 a viverem foram dos campos, com famílias e amigos, podem ser menos visíveis mas são um peso significativo para os seus hospedeiros.
Quatro obstáculos principais impedem os deslocados de voltarem às suas casas. Primeiro, muitos continuam a recear mais violência dos seus vizinhos e não confiam que as forças de segurança garantam a sua protecção.

Isto precisa de ser resolvido apressando a reforma do sector da segurança, incluindo dando prioridade ao policiamento comunitário; processando incendiários e criminosos violentos; e promovendo um processo de diálogo e reconciliação local e nacional. Mesmo assim, nalguns casos, não será possível que as pessoas regressem às suas comunidades originais e é necessário providencial alternativas.

Os ataques em 11 Fevereiro 2008 contra o Presidente Ramos-Horta e o Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão, que deixaram o último seriamente ferido, mostraram porque é que muita gente receia mais violência.

Contudo, a morte do líder amotinado Alfredo Reinado pode ajudar a reduzir o medo, particularmente se se puder tratar dos restantes dos seus combatentes. A sua morte não desencadeou desassossego entre os seus apoiantes e simpatizantes urbanos que muitos tinham previsto, apesar de haver ainda um potencial para problemas depois de se levantar o recolher obrigatório e o Estado de Sítio. Mas o Reinado era uma manifestação, não a causa, das divisões de Timor. O governo precisa de responder às causas fundamentais do conflito, tais como tensões comunais, problemas dentro das forças de segurança e falta de oportunidades económicas – antes de aparecer o próximo Reinado.

Em segundo lugar, a provisão de alimentação e abrigos gratuitos torna a vida num campo nalguns aspectos mais atraente do que as alternativas. Um outro factor que torna os deslocados da província mais relutantes em saírem dos campos em Dili é que a capital oferece muitas mais oportunidades económicas.

Em terceiro lugar, alguns dos campos são de facto dirigidos por indivíduos e grupos que investiram recursos em manter os números altos, ou porque controlam o mercado negro para a revenda da ajuda alimentar ou porque acreditam que números maiores lhes dão mais peso político. Nalguns casos, eles intimidaram ou preveniram pessoas de partirem.

Finalmente, muitos deslocados não têm casas para onde regressar. As casas destruídas ou danificadas não foram reconstruídas, e outras estão sujeitas a disputas de propriedade que não podem ser resolvidas sob o sistema da lei de terra de Timor-Leste incompleta e inadequada. Mais em geral, a bolsa de habitações não é simplesmente suficiente para a população do país. A não ser que construam mais casas e que introduzam sistemas para resolver as disputas de propriedade e providenciem títulos de posse seguros, a absoluta procura de casas continuará a ser um impedimento para assentar os deslocados e uma causa para mais deslocações.

Para além da ajuda humanitária pouco foi feito em 2006-2007 para responder à crise de deslocação, mas o governo que tomou posse em Agosto de 2007 tem uma abordagem mais vigorosa. Está a acabar com a distribuição de comida universal nos campos e não recuou apesar dos protestos e receios de desassossego depois da morte de Reinado. Caminha agora para um plano alargado do governo – a estratégia de recuperação nacional – que responde a muitos, se não todos, os aspectos do problema. Alguns governantes de topo, retêm ainda expectativas irrealistas acerca da facilidade e da velocidade com que se pode induzir os deslocados a voltarem a casa. Contudo, o governo em geral está a começar a entender a complexidade e o planeamento numa base mais realista e multi-anual.

Conquanto a nova estratégia de recuperação nacional contenha muitos dos elementos necessários para reintegrar os deslocados nas suas comunidades ou, onde não for possível, mudá-los para casas novas, o governo não lhe alocou recursos suficientes. Apenas o primeiro pilar – reconstrução de casas – tem financiamento no orçamento de 2008, e não adequado. Não foi previsto nenhum dinheiro para os igualmente importantes elementos não-infra-estruturais, tais como reforçar a segurança, apoio aos meios de vida, redes de reconciliação e de segurança social.

A estratégia não responde também a opções como reconstrução dessas propriedades – a maioria – que estão sujeitas a disputas de propriedade. Timor precisa muitíssimo de novas leis da terra, de um registo de propriedades, de um sistema de emissão de títulos, e de mecanismos de mediação e de resolução de disputas. A maioria dos registos de propriedade de terras foram destruídos em 1999, e muita gente nunca os teve, em primeiro lugar; há ainda conflitos entre regimes de terra tradicional, Portugueses e Indonésios. Estes problemas estão por debaixo de muitas deslocações – pessoas que tiraram vantagens do caos de 2006 para correr com vizinhos de propriedades disputadas – e riscam minar a estabilidade a longo prazo e o crescimento económico. Existem projectos de leis da terra, mas governos sucessivos consideraram-nos demasiado controversos. Precisam de ser aprovados mas, importantes como são, a reforma da lei da terra demora tempo e são precisos caminhos alternativos para alojar os deslocados cujas casas estão sujeitas a disputas de propriedade.
A implementação da estratégia de recuperação deve ser uma prioridade com financiamento adequado para todos os ministérios envolvidos. Conquanto o governo precise de alguma ajuda das instituições financeiras internacionais e dos dadores, Timor-Leste tem os recursos para cobrir mais das carências para programas de deslocados no seu próprio orçamento de 2008 e deve fazer isso . Todas as partes precisam de reconhecer que quanto mais tempo deixarem o problema prolongar-se , mais difícil será resolvê-lo e mais a possibilidade que isso leve ainda a mais violência.

RECOMENDAÇÔES

Para o Governo de Timor-Leste:

1. Façam publicidade e explicar a estratégia de recuperação nacional (Hamutuk Hari'i Futuru) totalmente aos deslocados e às comunidades receptoras, enfatizando que é o melhor e o último pacote para os retornados e que os que não a aceitarem ficam de fora.

2. Avaliem os custos desses elementos da estratégia que correntemente não têm financiamento e usem a revisão orçamental a meio do ano para assegurar que a cada pilar da estratégia, e a cada linha ministerial, seja alocado pelo menos algum financiamento dos recursos do governo central, com o total a ser preenchido da concessão de empréstimos internacionais e apoio de dadores externos.

3. Recomecem os processos de diálogo do ministério da solidariedade social, com o foco em comunidades onde a violência deslocou muita gente, para os encorajar a aceitar o regresso dos deslocados e aloquem mais recursos ao ministério para este propósito.

4. Disseminem e adoptem as recomendações do relatório da Comissão de Abertura, Verdade e Reconciliação Chega!, como uma contribuição para o diálogo nacional e reconciliação.
5. Levem à justiça os principais responsáveis pela violência de 2006, incluindo os que provocaram propositadamente os fogos e garantam que o crime de fogo posto é tratado com severidade pelo sistema da justiça.

6. Acelerem o processo da reforma do sector da segurança, dando prioridade ao policiamento comunitário e à protecção das pessoas vulneráveis, e ao mesmo aumentem a presença da polícia nas partes problemáticas em Dili e patrulhem com regularidade os campos e as comunidades para onde voltarem os deslocados.

7. Acabem de vez com a distribuição universal de comida nos campos e, com a assistência dos dadores e de outros, realizem uma avaliação rigorosa das pessoas e grupos vulneráveis quer dentro como fora dos campos para assistir à montagem de mecanismos efectivos de apoio social.

8. Desenvolvam programas, em cooperação com os dadores, para criar mais oportunidade de emprego fora de Dili e ponham o foco não apenas em empregos de curto prazo, mas também na criação de oportunidades permanentes de meios de vida com um ênfase forte nas necessidades das mulheres.

9. Desenvolvam um regime de propriedade de terras funcional, que inclua:

(a) aprovação das leis da terra projectadas pelo ministério da justiça em 2004 para substituir a mistura insatisfatória corrente de legislação Indonésia, da ONU e pós-independência;

(b) priorizar a criação do registo de propriedades e do sistema de títulos de terra;

(c) criar mecanismos de mediação e de resolução de disputas com poderes de aplicação; e

(d) providenciar recursos adequados para lidar com o grande número de disputas, bem como questões de títulos de posse que aflijam particularmente as mulheres.

10. Implementem a Estratégia Nacional de Habitação de 2004, para assim facilitar a carência geral de habitações que estão por debaixo de muitas deslocações individuais.

11. Aceitem que as pessoas que foram deslocadas são e continuarão a ser residentes em Dili, façam planos para providenciar habitação e serviços básicos para a população crescente da capital e substituam o Plano Urbano de Dili por um novo que receba sugestões de todas as partes e que reflicta o tamanho e as circunstâncias actuais da cidade.

12. Façam planos de contingência para futuras crises de deslocação, incluindo as que resultarem de desastres naturais que:

(a) identificam locais adequados para campos; e

(b) desenvolvam as capacidades de gestão e resposta do governo sob a liderança dos gabinetes do primeiro-ministro ou do vice-primeiro-ministro.

Para a Missão da ONU (UNMIT), Parceiros do Desenvolvimento e Organizações Não Governamentais (ONGs):

13. Apoiem o governo na implementação da estratégia de recuperação nacional, incluindo com o encorajamento a instituições financeiras internacionais para concederem empréstimos para infra-estruturas e criação de empregos, e com a concessão de financiamentos adicionais para completar a alocação do próprio governo para os outros elementos.

14. Peçam que todos os os pedidos de assistência da estratégia de recuperação nacional sejam canalizados através dum único órgão do governo, tal como o gabinete do vice-primeiro-ministro.

15. Encorajem o governo a dar atenção a todos os cinco elementos da estratégia e a áreas cruciais não cobertas pela estratégia, incluindo pôr fim à impunidade pela violência de 2006, novas leis da terra, um registo de propriedades, um sistema de títulos para emitir títulos, e mecanismos de mediação e de resolução de disputas, e ofereçam apoio técnico em áreas como as de gestão de desastres, planeamento urbano e administração de propriedades.

Dili/Bruxelas, 31 Março 2008

Full_Report (pdf* format - 545.9 Kbytes)

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Crise de deslocação de Timor-Leste
International Crisis Group
Date: 31 Mar 2008

Asia Report N°148

RESUMO E RECOMENDAÇÕES

Os disparos contra o Presidente José Ramos-Horta em Fevereiro de 2008 sublinham a urgência de se responder às fontes do conflito e da violência em Timor-Leste. A crise de deslocação não resolvida é um dos problemas importantes, e simultaneamente uma consequência do último conflito e uma fonte potencial de problemas futuros. Quase dois anos depois do país ter caído em conflito civil em Abril 2006, mais de 100,000 pessoas continuam deslocadas. Governos sucessivos e os seus parceiros internacionais falharam em arranjar as condições por meio das quais eles podiam voltar a casa ou em prevenir mais vagas de deslocações. A estratégia de recuperação nacional do novo governo precisa de ser devidamente financiada e acompanhada por um número de outros elementos cruciais, sendo o mais significativo a criação dum regime de terras e propriedades justo e funcional um aumento em geral de uma bolsa de habitações e pôr fim ao ciclo de impunidade e reformar os sectores de justiça e de segurança.

Com 30,000 deslocados a viverem em campos na capital, Dili, os deslocados são uma evidência altamente visível do falhanço em providenciar segurança e aplicar o domínio da lei. Tanto quanto uma tragédia humanitária, são em si mesmo um risco de conflito. Os 70,000 a viverem foram dos campos, com famílias e amigos, podem ser menos visíveis mas são um peso significativo para os seus hospedeiros.
Quatro obstáculos principais impedem os deslocados de voltarem às suas casas. Primeiro, muitos continuam a recear mais violência dos seus vizinhos e não confiam que as forças de segurança garantam a sua protecção.

Isto precisa de ser resolvido apressando a reforma do sector da segurança, incluindo dando prioridade ao policiamento comunitário; processando incendiários e criminosos violentos; e promovendo um processo de diálogo e reconciliação local e nacional. Mesmo assim, nalguns casos, não será possível que as pessoas regressem às suas comunidades originais e é necessário providencial alternativas.

Os ataques em 11 Fevereiro 2008 contra o Presidente Ramos-Horta e o Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão, que deixaram o último seriamente ferido, mostraram porque é que muita gente receia mais violência.

Contudo, a morte do líder amotinado Alfredo Reinado pode ajudar a reduzir o medo, particularmente se se puder tratar dos restantes dos seus combatentes. A sua morte não desencadeou desassossego entre os seus apoiantes e simpatizantes urbanos que muitos tinham previsto, apesar de haver ainda um potencial para problemas depois de se levantar o recolher obrigatório e o Estado de Sítio. Mas o Reinado era uma manifestação, não a causa, das divisões de Timor. O governo precisa de responder às causas fundamentais do conflito, tais como tensões comunais, problemas dentro das forças de segurança e falta de oportunidades económicas – antes de aparecer o próximo Reinado.

Em segundo lugar, a provisão de alimentação e abrigos gratuitos torna a vida num campo nalguns aspectos mais atraente do que as alternativas. Um outro factor que torna os deslocados da província mais relutantes em saírem dos campos em Dili é que a capital oferece muitas mais oportunidades económicas.

Em terceiro lugar, alguns dos campos são de facto dirigidos por indivíduos e grupos que investiram recursos em manter os números altos, ou porque controlam o mercado negro para a revenda da ajuda alimentar ou porque acreditam que números maiores lhes dão mais peso político. Nalguns casos, eles intimidaram ou preveniram pessoas de partirem.

Finalmente, muitos deslocados não têm casas para onde regressar. As casas destruídas ou danificadas não foram reconstruídas, e outras estão sujeitas a disputas de propriedade que não podem ser resolvidas sob o sistema da lei de terra de Timor-Leste incompleta e inadequada. Mais em geral, a bolsa de habitações não é simplesmente suficiente para a população do país. A não ser que construam mais casas e que introduzam sistemas para resolver as disputas de propriedade e providenciem títulos de posse seguros, a absoluta procura de casas continuará a ser um impedimento para assentar os deslocados e uma causa para mais deslocações.

Para além da ajuda humanitária pouco foi feito em 2006-2007 para responder à crise de deslocação, mas o governo que tomou posse em Agosto de 2007 tem uma abordagem mais vigorosa. Está a acabar com a distribuição de comida universal nos campos e não recuou apesar dos protestos e receios de desassossego depois da morte de Reinado. Caminha agora para um plano alargado do governo – a estratégia de recuperação nacional – que responde a muitos, se não todos, os aspectos do problema. Alguns governantes de topo, retêm ainda expectativas irrealistas acerca da facilidade e da velocidade com que se pode induzir os deslocados a voltarem a casa. Contudo, o governo em geral está a começar a entender a complexidade e o planeamento numa base mais realista e multi-anual.

Conquanto a nova estratégia de recuperação nacional contenha muitos dos elementos necessários para reintegrar os deslocados nas suas comunidades ou, onde não for possível, mudá-los para casas novas, o governo não lhe alocou recursos suficientes. Apenas o primeiro pilar – reconstrução de casas – tem financiamento no orçamento de 2008, e não adequado. Não foi previsto nenhum dinheiro para os igualmente importantes elementos não-infra-estruturais, tais como reforçar a segurança, apoio aos meios de vida, redes de reconciliação e de segurança social.

A estratégia não responde também a opções como reconstrução dessas propriedades – a maioria – que estão sujeitas a disputas de propriedade. Timor precisa muitíssimo de novas leis da terra, de um registo de propriedades, de um sistema de emissão de títulos, e de mecanismos de mediação e de resolução de disputas. A maioria dos registos de propriedade de terras foram destruídos em 1999, e muita gente nunca os teve, em primeiro lugar; há ainda conflitos entre regimes de terra tradicional, Portugueses e Indonésios. Estes problemas estão por debaixo de muitas deslocações – pessoas que tiraram vantagens do caos de 2006 para correr com vizinhos de propriedades disputadas – e riscam minar a estabilidade a longo prazo e o crescimento económico. Existem projectos de leis da terra, mas governos sucessivos consideraram-nos demasiado controversos. Precisam de ser aprovados mas, importantes como são, a reforma da lei da terra demora tempo e são precisos caminhos alternativos para alojar os deslocados cujas casas estão sujeitas a disputas de propriedade.
A implementação da estratégia de recuperação deve ser uma prioridade com financiamento adequado para todos os ministérios envolvidos. Conquanto o governo precise de alguma ajuda das instituições financeiras internacionais e dos dadores, Timor-Leste tem os recursos para cobrir mais das carências para programas de deslocados no seu próprio orçamento de 2008 e deve fazer isso . Todas as partes precisam de reconhecer que quanto mais tempo deixarem o problema prolongar-se , mais difícil será resolvê-lo e mais a possibilidade que isso leve ainda a mais violência.

RECOMENDAÇÔES

Para o Governo de Timor-Leste:

1. Façam publicidade e explicar a estratégia de recuperação nacional (Hamutuk Hari'i Futuru) totalmente aos deslocados e às comunidades receptoras, enfatizando que é o melhor e o último pacote para os retornados e que os que não a aceitarem ficam de fora.

2. Avaliem os custos desses elementos da estratégia que correntemente não têm financiamento e usem a revisão orçamental a meio do ano para assegurar que a cada pilar da estratégia, e a cada linha ministerial, seja alocado pelo menos algum financiamento dos recursos do governo central, com o total a ser preenchido da concessão de empréstimos internacionais e apoio de dadores externos.

3. Recomecem os processos de diálogo do ministério da solidariedade social, com o foco em comunidades onde a violência deslocou muita gente, para os encorajar a aceitar o regresso dos deslocados e aloquem mais recursos ao ministério para este propósito.

4. Disseminem e adoptem as recomendações do relatório da Comissão de Abertura, Verdade e Reconciliação Chega!, como uma contribuição para o diálogo nacional e reconciliação.
5. Levem à justiça os principais responsáveis pela violência de 2006, incluindo os que provocaram propositadamente os fogos e garantam que o crime de fogo posto é tratado com severidade pelo sistema da justiça.

6. Acelerem o processo da reforma do sector da segurança, dando prioridade ao policiamento comunitário e à protecção das pessoas vulneráveis, e ao mesmo aumentem a presença da polícia nas partes problemáticas em Dili e patrulhem com regularidade os campos e as comunidades para onde voltarem os deslocados.

7. Acabem de vez com a distribuição universal de comida nos campos e, com a assistência dos dadores e de outros, realizem uma avaliação rigorosa das pessoas e grupos vulneráveis quer dentro como fora dos campos para assistir à montagem de mecanismos efectivos de apoio social.

8. Desenvolvam programas, em cooperação com os dadores, para criar mais oportunidade de emprego fora de Dili e ponham o foco não apenas em empregos de curto prazo, mas também na criação de oportunidades permanentes de meios de vida com um ênfase forte nas necessidades das mulheres.

9. Desenvolvam um regime de propriedade de terras funcional, que inclua:

(a) aprovação das leis da terra projectadas pelo ministério da justiça em 2004 para substituir a mistura insatisfatória corrente de legislação Indonésia, da ONU e pós-independência;

(b) priorizar a criação do registo de propriedades e do sistema de títulos de terra;

(c) criar mecanismos de mediação e de resolução de disputas com poderes de aplicação; e

(d) providenciar recursos adequados para lidar com o grande número de disputas, bem como questões de títulos de posse que aflijam particularmente as mulheres.

10. Implementem a Estratégia Nacional de Habitação de 2004, para assim facilitar a carência geral de habitações que estão por debaixo de muitas deslocações individuais.

11. Aceitem que as pessoas que foram deslocadas são e continuarão a ser residentes em Dili, façam planos para providenciar habitação e serviços básicos para a população crescente da capital e substituam o Plano Urbano de Dili por um novo que receba sugestões de todas as partes e que reflicta o tamanho e as circunstâncias actuais da cidade.

12. Façam planos de contingência para futuras crises de deslocação, incluindo as que resultarem de desastres naturais que:

(a) identificam locais adequados para campos; e

(b) desenvolvam as capacidades de gestão e resposta do governo sob a liderança dos gabinetes do primeiro-ministro ou do vice-primeiro-ministro.

Para a Missão da ONU (UNMIT), Parceiros do Desenvolvimento e Organizações Não Governamentais (ONGs):

13. Apoiem o governo na implementação da estratégia de recuperação nacional, incluindo com o encorajamento a instituições financeiras internacionais para concederem empréstimos para infra-estruturas e criação de empregos, e com a concessão de financiamentos adicionais para completar a alocação do próprio governo para os outros elementos.

14. Peçam que todos os os pedidos de assistência da estratégia de recuperação nacional sejam canalizados através dum único órgão do governo, tal como o gabinete do vice-primeiro-ministro.

15. Encorajem o governo a dar atenção a todos os cinco elementos da estratégia e a áreas cruciais não cobertas pela estratégia, incluindo pôr fim à impunidade pela violência de 2006, novas leis da terra, um registo de propriedades, um sistema de títulos para emitir títulos, e mecanismos de mediação e de resolução de disputas, e ofereçam apoio técnico em áreas como as de gestão de desastres, planeamento urbano e administração de propriedades.

Dili/Bruxelas, 31 Março 2008

Full_Report (pdf* format - 545.9 Kbytes)

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.