sexta-feira, janeiro 18, 2008

Timor-Leste: Security Sector Reform

International Crisis Group

Asia Report N°143
17 January 2008

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Four years after Timor-Leste gained independence, its police and army were fighting each other in the streets of Dili. The April-June 2006 crisis left both institutions in ruins and security again in the hands of international forces. The crisis was precipitated by the dismissal of almost half the army and caused the virtual collapse of the police force. UN police and Australian-led peacekeepers maintain security in a situation that, while not at a point of violent conflict, remains unsettled. If the new government is to reform the security sector successfully, it must ensure that the process is inclusive by consulting widely and resisting the tempation to take autocratic decisions. A systematic, comprehensive approach, as recommended by the UN Security Council, should be based on a realistic analysis of actual security and law-enforcement needs. Unless there is a non-partisan commitment to the reform process, structural problems are likely to remain unresolved and the security forces politicised and volatile.

The problems run deep. Neither the UN administration nor successive Timorese governments did enough to build a national consensus about security needs and the kind of forces required to meet them. There is no national security policy, and there are important gaps in security-related legislation. The police suffer from low status and an excess of political interference. The army still trades on its heroism in resisting the Indonesian occupation but has not yet found a new role and has been plagued by regional (east-west) rivalry. There is a lack of transparency and orderly arrangements in political control as well as parliamentary and judicial oversight with respect to both forces.

The government that took office in August 2007 has an opportunity – while international troops maintain basic security and the UN offers assistance – to conduct a genuine reform of the security sector, drawing on the experiences of other post-conflict countries. But international goodwill is not inexhaustible – there are already signs of donor fatigue – so it needs to act fast.

For its part, the international community must do a better job of coordinating its support to the security sector and responding to a Timorese-owned reform process. For example, the UN police who screen and mentor the local force should be better trained and supervised, and more responsive to feedback from their Timorese colleagues. The departure of the lead UN official on security sector reform at the end of 2007 means that this issue, already sidelined during the 2007 elections, risks further delay.

The fundamental question of who does what requires particular attention. Lines have been blurred between the police and the army. A tenet of security sector reform is that the police should have primary responsibility for internal security. However, the Timorese police have not been given the resources, training and backing to fulfil this role effectively, and national leaders have been too ready to call in the army when disorder threatens. The police structures should be simplified, with greater emphasis on community policing, to help prevent local situations from getting out of hand. Morale is perilously low and will only improve through a sustained process of professionalisation.

The new government’s plan to transfer responsibility for border management from the police to the army is a mistake which could lead to increased tension along a poorly demarcated border, on the other side of which is a heavy Indonesian military presence. It could also see a backlash from local communities that feel the army still has a regional bias. It does make sense, however, for the military to take full responsibility for marine security, an important concern for Timor-Leste. It also has an important part to play in supporting the police when internal security gets out of control and in responding to natural catastrophes – but in both cases subordinate to the police and civilian authorities. The planned introduction of conscription is unnecessary and would exacerbate problems within the force.

Some steps can be taken without waiting for the comprehensive review the Security Council has called for: for example, increasing salaries, improving donor coordination, addressing legislative gaps and improving disciplinary procedures. But key questions such as force size, major equipment purchases, and army and police role definitions should wait until a consultative process has allowed Timor’s citizens to have their say. While outside the scope of this report, wider legal system reform is an essential corollary of security sector reform, if Timor-Leste is to have a functioning system of law and order.

The post-independence honeymoon ended in 2006. Neither Timorese nor internationals any longer have the excuse of inexperience or unfamiliarity to explain further failings. With international forces providing a temporary safety net, now is the best and possibly last chance for the government and its partners to get security sector reform right.

RECOMMENDATIONS

To the Timor-Leste Government:

1. Give a high priority to the comprehensive review of the security sector called for in UN Security Council Resolution 1704 and subsequent UN reports, delaying major reforms until it is completed.

2. Clarify and distinguish the roles of the police and army, ensuring that the police have primary responsibility for internal security and receive the necessary personnel, tools, training and political support.

3. Take advantage of the expertise in the UN’s Security Sector Support Unit to conduct national consultations on security sector reform.

4. Separate the petitioners or deserters from the 2006 crisis who have justifiable grievances from those who have illegally taken arms, incited unrest or are responsible for criminal acts; consider the former for amnesty; and deal with the latter in accordance with the law.

5. Establish robust and independent oversight mechanisms to investigate complaints of police and military misconduct, as recommended by the October 2006 Commission of Inquiry (CoI) report.

6. Develop an intelligence structure that is law-based and accountable.

7. Ensure that new legislation on pensions covers more veterans and liberalises or eliminates the age limit.

To the President and Prime Minister:

8. Clarify, by new legislation if necessary, who has the lead role in security sector policy and ensure that the constitutional requirements for presidential involvement in the security sector are followed.

To the UN Mission (UNMIT):

9. Give the Security Sector Support Unit – the key body for dealing with the government on security sector reform – the resources and staff to assist the consultation process and comprehensive review.

To the UN Police:

10. Improve pre-deployment training for UN police, giving more emphasis to the local context, a standardised process for mentoring and a longer period for adjustment to UN practices and procedures.

To the Timorese Police:

11. Use the Reform, Restructuring and Rebuilding (RRR) process to reduce the number of units and management structures.

12. Make community policing a priority for force development by developing a Timorese concept and establishing a coordination unit at headquarters.

To the Army and the Ministry of Defence and Security:

13. Improve quality by prioritising training of mid- to high-level officers, while international forces are handling operational responsibilities, and by recruiting new personnel through a selection process that reflects the standards of a professional army with career prospects rather than by instituting conscription.

To the Army and Police:

14. Conduct joint training in order to clarify procedures for interaction, including military help in a state of emergency.

15. Establish clear, impartial internal complaints procedures and ensure personnel do not fear that using them will damage their careers.

16. Inculcate an ethos of non-partisanship, including by transparent promotions and discipline based on internal procedures and criteria rather than external political affiliation.

To Bilateral Donors:

17. Establish a mechanism to improve coordination of assistance to the security sector and require all requests for such aid to come through the ministry of defence and security.

18. Consider conditioning security sector assistance on progress in the key areas of legislative reform, as well as in developing a national security policy and implementing CoI recommendations.

Dili/Brussels, 17 January 2008

(View full report here)

Tradução:

Timor-Leste: Reforma do Sector da Segurança International Crisis Group

Asia Relatório N°14317 Janeiro 2008

RESUMO EXECUTIVO E RECOMENDAÇÕES

Quatro anos depois de Timor-Leste ter ganho a independência, os seus polícias e militares estavam a lutar uns contra os outros nas ruas de Dili. A crise de Abril-Junho de 2006 deixou ambas as instituições em ruína e outra vez a segurança nas mãos de forças internacionais. A crise foi precipitada pela demissão de quase metade das forças armadas e causou o colapso virtual da força da polícia. A polícia da ONU e tropas lideradas pelos Australianos mantém a segurança numa situação que, conquanto não num ponto de conflito violento, se mantém por resolver. Se o novo governo quiser ter sucesso na reforma do sector da segurança, deve assegurar que o processo é inclusivo e fazer amplas consultas e resistir à tentação de tomar decisões autocráticas. Uma abordagem sistemática e compreensiva, conforme recomendado pelo Conselho de Segurança da ONU, deve ter por base uma análise realista da segurança actual e das necessidades de aplicação da lei. A não ser que haja um comprometimento não-partidário no processo de reforma, é provável que os problemas estruturais permaneçam por resolver e as forças de segurança politizadas e voláteis.

Os problemas são profundos. Nem a administração da ONU nem os sucessivos governos Timorenses fizeram o suficiente para construir um consenso nacional acerca das necessidades da segurança e o tipo de forças requeridos para as responder. Não há nenhuma política nacional de segurança, e há falhas importantes na legislação relacionada com a segurança. A polícia sofre de estatuto baixo e de um excesso de interferência política. As forças armadas ainda aludem ao seu heroísmo ao resistir à ocupação Indonésia mas ainda não encontrou um novo papel e tem sofrido de rivalidades regionais (leste-oeste). Há uma falta de transparência e de arranjos adequados no controlo politico bem como na fiscalização parlamentar e judicial no que respeita ambas as forças.

O governo que tomou posse em Agosto de 2007 tem uma oportunidade – enquanto as tropas internacionais mantém a segurança básica e a ONU oferece assistência – de conduzir uma reforma genuína do sector da segurança, recolhendo a experiência doutros países pós-conflito.

Mas a boa vontade internacional não é inesgotável – já há sinais de fadiga dos dadores – por isso precisa de agir com rapidez.

Pela sua parte, a comunidade internacional precisa de trabalhar melhor a coordenar o seu apoio ao sector da segurança e a responder a um processo de reforma que é propriedade dos Timorenses. Por exemplo, a polícia da ONU que fez o escrutínio e a monitorização da força local devia ter sido melhor formada e supervisionada e mais aberta às opiniões dos seus colegas Timorenses. A saída do oficial da ONU que liderava a reforma do sector da segurança no final de 2007 significa que esta questão, já posta de lado durante as eleições de 2007, se arrisca a mais demoras.

A questão fundamental de quem requer uma atenção particular. Foram manchadas linhas entre a polícia e as forças armadas. Um princípio da reforma do sector da segurança é que a polícia deve ter a responsabilidade principal na segurança interna. Contudo, à polícia Timorense não foram dados os recursos, formação e apoio para desempenhar com eficácia o seu papel, e os lideres nacionais têm sido demasiado prontos a chamar as forças armadas quando ameaça haver desordens. As estruturas da polícia devem ser simplificadas, com maior ênfase no policiamento comunitário, para ajudar a prevenir que situações locais fiquem fora do controlo. A moral está perigosamente baixa e só melhorará através de um processo sustentado de profissionalização.
O plano do novo governo para transferir a responsabilidade da gestão da fronteira da polícia para as forças armadas é um erro que pode levar a aumentar as tensões ao longo duma fronteira pobremente demarcada, no outro lado da qual há uma pesada presença militar Indonésia. Pode testemunhar ainda um retrocesso das comunidades locais que sentem que as forças armadas têm um preconceito regional. Contudo, faz sentido, que os militares assumam toda a responsabilidade da segurança marítima, uma importante preocupação para Timor-Leste. Isso tem também um papel importante no apoio à polícia quando a segurança interna fugir do controlo e a responder a catástrofes naturais – mas em ambos os casos subordinada à polícia e às autoridades civis. A planeada introdução do recrutamento militar obrigatório é desnecessário e exacerbará os problemas no seio da força.


Podem dar-se alguns passos sem esperar pela revisão compreensiva a que aludiu o Conselho de Segurança: por exemplo, aumentar os salários, melhorar a coordenação dos dadores, responder às falhas legislativas e melhorar os procedimentos disciplinares. Mas questões chave como o tamanho da força, compras de equipamentos maiores, e definição do papel das forças armadas e da polícia devem esperar até um processo de consulta que permita que os cidadãos de Timor façam ouvir a sua voz. Conquanto fora do âmbito deste relatório, um corolário essencial da reforma do sector da segurança é uma reforma mais ampla do sistema legal, se Timor-Leste é para ter um sistema de lei e ordem funcional.

A lua de mel pós-independência acabou em 2006. Nem os Timorenses nem os internacionais têm por mais tempo a desculpa da inexperiência ou da falta de familiaridade para explicar mais falhanços. Com as forças internacionais a fornecerem uma rede de segurança temporária, agora é a melhor e possivelmente a última oportunidade para o governo e os seus parceiros acertarem na reforma do sector da segurança.

RECOMENDAÇÕES

Ao Governo de Timor-Leste:

1. Dar uma alta prioridade à revisão compreensiva do sector da segurança a que alude a Resolução 1704 do Conselho de Segurança e subsequentes relatórios da ONU, atrasando reformas maiores até isso estar completo

2. Clarificar e distinguir os papéis da polícia e das forças armadas, assegurando que a polícia tem a responsabilidade primária da segurança interna e que receba o pessoal, instrumentos, formação e apoio político necessário.

3. Tirar vantagem da experiência da Unidade de Apoio do Sector de Segurança da ONU para conduzir consultas nacionais sobre a reforma do sector da segurança.

4. Separar os peticionários ou desertores da crise de 2006 que têm queixas justificadas dos que pegaram ilegalmente em armas, incitaram o desassossego ou são responsáveis por actos criminosos; considerar amnistia para os primeiros; e lidar com os últimos de acordo com a lei.

5. Estabelecer mecanismos de fiscalização robustos e independentes para investigar queixas de má conduta de polícias e militares, como recomendado pelo relatório de Outubro de 2006 da Comissão de Inquérito (CoI).

6. Desenvolver uma estrutura de serviços de informações com base na lei e responsável.

7. Garantir que a nova legislação sobre pensões cobre mais veteranos e liberaliza ou elimina o limite de idade.

Ao Presidente e Primeiro-Ministro:

8. Clarificar, com nova legislação se necessário, quem tem o papel líder na política do sector da segurança e garantir que são seguidos os requerimentos constitucionais para o envolvimento presidencial no sector da segurança.

À Missão da ONU (UNMIT):

9. Dar à Unidade de Apoio do Sector da Segurança – o órgão chave para lidar com o governo sobre a reforma do sector da segurança – os recursos e o pessoal para assistir ao processo de consulta e revisão compreensiva.

À Polícia da ONU:

10. Melhorar a formação pré-destacamento da polícia da ONU, dando mais ênfase ao contexto local, a um processo padronizado para a monitorização e a períodos mais longos de adaptação a práticas e procedimentos da ONU.

À Polícia Timorense:

11. Usar o processo de Reforma, Reestruturação e Reconstrução (RRR) para reduzir o número de unidades e estruturas de gestão.

12. Dar prioridade ao policiamento comunitário para o desenvolvimento da força desenvolvendo um conceito Timorense e estabelecendo uma unidade de coordenação em quartéis-generais.

Às Forças Armadas e Ministério da Defesa e Segurança:

13. Melhorar a qualidade dando prioridade na formação a oficiais de nível médio a alto, enquanto as forças internacionais gerem as responsabilidades operacionais, e com o recrutamento de novo pessoal através de um processo de selecção que reflicta os padrões de forças armadas profissionais com perspectivas de carreira em vez de se instituir o Recrutamento Militar Obrigatório.

Às Forças Armadas e Polícia:

14. Conduzir formação conjunta de modo a clarificar procedimentos, incluindo ajuda militar num estado de emergência.

15. Estabelecer procedimentos para queixas internas claros, imparciais assegurar ao pessoal para não recear que usá-los não causa danos nas suas carreiras.

16. Inculcar uma ética não-partidária, com inclusão de promoções transparentes e com disciplina com base em procedimentos internos e critérios, em vez de em afiliação política externa.

Aos Dadores Bilaterais:

17. Estabelecer um mecanismo para melhorar a coordenação da assistência ao sector da segurança e exigir que todos os pedidos para tal ajuda venham através do ministério da defesa e segurança.

18. Considerar o condicionamento da assistência ao sector da segurança a progressos nas áreas chave da reforma legislativa, bem como ao desenvolvimento duma política de segurança nacional e à implementação das recomendações da CoI.

Dili/Bruxelas, 17 Janeiro 2008

(Ver relatório completo aqui)

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Timor-Leste: Reforma do Sector da Segurança
International Crisis Group

Asia Relatório N°143
17 Janeiro 2008

RESUMO EXECUTIVO E RECOMENDAÇÕES

Quatro anos depois de Timor-Leste ter ganho a independência, os seus polícias e militares estavam a lutar uns contra os outros nas ruas de Dili. A crise de Abril-Junho de 2006 deixou ambas as instituições em ruína e outra vez a segurança nas mãos de forças internacionais. A crise foi precipitada pela demissão de quase metade das forças armadas e causou o colapso virtual da força da polícia. A polícia da ONU e tropas lideradas pelos Australianos mantém a segurança numa situação que, conquanto não num ponto de conflito violento, se mantém por resolver. Se o novo governo quiser ter sucesso na reforma do sector da segurança, deve assegurar que o processo é inclusivo e fazer amplas consultas e resistir à tentação de tomar decisões autocráticas. Uma abordagem sistemática e compreensiva, conforme recomendado pelo Conselho de Segurança da ONU, deve ter por base uma análise realista da segurança actual e das necessidades de aplicação da lei. A não ser que haja um comprometimento não-partidário no processo de reforma, é provável que os problemas estruturais permaneçam por resolver e as forças de segurança politizadas e voláteis.

Os problemas são profundos. Nem a administração da ONU nem os sucessivos governos Timorenses fizeram o suficiente para construir um consenso nacional acerca das necessidades da segurança e o tipo de forças requeridos para as responder. Não há nenhuma política nacional de segurança, e há falhas importantes na legislação relacionada com a segurança. A polícia sofre de estatuto baixo e de um excesso de interferência política. As forças armadas ainda aludem ao seu heroísmo ao resistir à ocupação Indonésia mas ainda não encontrou um novo papel e tem sofrido de rivalidades regionais (leste-oeste). Há uma falta de transparência e de arranjos adequados no controlo politico bem como na fiscalização parlamentar e judicial no que respeita ambas as forças.

O governo que tomou posse em Agosto de 2007 tem uma oportunidade – enquanto as tropas internacionais mantém a segurança básica e a ONU oferece assistência – de conduzir uma reforma genuína do sector da segurança, recolhendo a experiência doutros países pós-conflito. Mas a boa vontade internacional não é inesgotável – já há sinais de fadiga dos dadores – por isso precisa de agir com rapidez.

Pela sua parte, a comunidade internacional precisa de trabalhar melhor a coordenar o seu apoio ao sector da segurança e a responder a um processo de reforma que é propriedade dos Timorenses. Por exemplo, a polícia da ONU que fez o escrutínio e a monitorização da força local devia ter sido melhor formada e supervisionada e mais aberta às opiniões dos seus colegas Timorenses. A saída do oficial da ONU que liderava a reforma do sector da segurança no final de 2007 significa que esta questão, já posta de lado durante as eleições de 2007, se arrisca a mais demoras.

A questão fundamental de quem requer uma atenção particular. Foram manchadas linhas entre a polícia e as forças armadas. Um princípio da reforma do sector da segurança é que a polícia deve ter a responsabilidade principal na segurança interna. Contudo, à polícia Timorense não foram dados os recursos, formação e apoio para desempenhar com eficácia o seu papel, e os lideres nacionais têm sido demasiado prontos a chamar as forças armadas quando ameaça haver desordens. As estruturas da polícia devem ser simplificadas, com maior ênfase no policiamento comunitário, para ajudar a prevenir que situações locais fiquem fora do controlo. A moral está perigosamente baixa e só melhorará através de um processo sustentado de profissionalização.

O plano do novo governo para transferir a responsabilidade da gestão da fronteira da polícia para as forças armadas é um erro que pode levar a aumentar as tensões ao longo duma fronteira pobremente demarcada, no outro lado da qual há uma pesada presença militar Indonésia. Pode testemunhar ainda um retrocesso das comunidades locais que sentem que as forças armadas têm um preconceito regional. Contudo, faz sentido, que os militares assumam toda a responsabilidade da segurança marítima, uma importante preocupação para Timor-Leste. Isso tem também um papel importante no apoio à polícia quando a segurança interna fugir do controlo e a responder a catástrofes naturais – mas em ambos os casos subordinada à polícia e às autoridades civis. A planeada introdução do recrutamento militar obrigatório é desnecessário e exacerbará os problemas no seio da força.

Podem dar-se alguns passos sem esperar pela revisão compreensiva a que aludiu o Conselho de Segurança: por exemplo, aumentar os salários, melhorar a coordenação dos dadores, responder às falhas legislativas e melhorar os procedimentos disciplinares. Mas questões chave como o tamanho da força, compras de equipamentos maiores, e definição do papel das forças armadas e da polícia devem esperar até um processo de consulta que permita que os cidadãos de Timor façam ouvir a sua voz. Conquanto fora do âmbito deste relatório, um corolário essencial da reforma do sector da segurança é uma reforma mais ampla do sistema legal, se Timor-Leste é para ter um sistema de lei e ordem funcional.

A lua de mel pós-independência acabou em 2006. Nem os Timorenses nem os internacionais têm por mais tempo a desculpa da inexperiência ou da falta de familiaridade para explicar mais falhanços. Com as forças internacionais a fornecerem uma rede de segurança temporária, agora é a melhor e possivelmente a última oportunidade para o governo e os seus parceiros acertarem na reforma do sector da segurança.

RECOMENDAÇÕES

Ao Governo de Timor-Leste:

1. Dar uma alta prioridade à revisão compreensiva do sector da segurança a que alude a Resolução 1704 do Conselho de Segurança e subsequentes relatórios da ONU, atrasando reformas maiores até isso estar completo

2. Clarificar e distinguir os papéis da polícia e das forças armadas, assegurando que a polícia tem a responsabilidade primária da segurança interna e que receba o pessoal, instrumentos, formação e apoio político necessário.

3. Tirar vantagem da experiência da Unidade de Apoio do Sector de Segurança da ONU para conduzir consultas nacionais sobre a reforma do sector da segurança.

4. Separar os peticionários ou desertores da crise de 2006 que têm queixas justificadas dos que pegaram ilegalmente em armas, incitaram o desassossego ou são responsáveis por actos criminosos; considerar amnistia para os primeiros; e lidar com os últimos de acordo com a lei.

5. Estabelecer mecanismos de fiscalização robustos e independentes para investigar queixas de má conduta de polícias e militares, como recomendado pelo relatório de Outubro de 2006 da Comissão de Inquérito (CoI).

6. Desenvolver uma estrutura de serviços de informações com base na lei e responsável.

7. Garantir que a nova legislação sobre pensões cobre mais veteranos e liberaliza ou elimina o limite de idade.

Ao Presidente e Primeiro-Ministro:

8. Clarificar, com nova legislação se necessário, quem tem o papel líder na política do sector da segurança e garantir que são seguidos os requerimentos constitucionais para o envolvimento presidencial no sector da segurança.

À Missão da ONU (UNMIT):

9. Dar à Unidade de Apoio do Sector da Segurança – o órgão chave para lidar com o governo sobre a reforma do sector da segurança – os recursos e o pessoal para assistir ao processo de consulta e revisão compreensiva.

À Polícia da ONU:

10. Melhorar a formação pré-destacamento da polícia da ONU, dando mais ênfase ao contexto local, a um processo padronizado para a monitorização e a períodos mais longos de adaptação a práticas e procedimentos da ONU.

À Polícia Timorense:

11. Usar o processo de Reforma, Reestruturação e Reconstrução (RRR) para reduzir o número de unidades e estruturas de gestão.

12. Dar prioridade ao policiamento comunitário para o desenvolvimento da força desenvolvendo um conceito Timorense e estabelecendo uma unidade de coordenação em quartéis-generais.

Às Forças Armadas e Ministério da Defesa e Segurança:

13. Melhorar a qualidade dando prioridade na formação a oficiais de nível médio a alto, enquanto as forças internacionais gerem as responsabilidades operacionais, e com o recrutamento de novo pessoal através de um processo de selecção que reflicta os padrões de forças armadas profissionais com perspectivas de carreira em vez de se instituir o Recrutamento Militar Obrigatório.

Às Forças Armadas e Polícia:

14. Conduzir formação conjunta de modo a clarificar procedimentos, incluindo ajuda militar num estado de emergência.

15. Estabelecer procedimentos para queixas internas claros, imparciais assegurar ao pessoal para não recear que usá-los não causa danos nas suas carreiras.

16. Inculcar uma ética não-partidária, com inclusão de promoções transparentes e com disciplina com base em procedimentos internos e critérios, em vez de em afiliação política externa.

Aos Dadores Bilaterais:

17. Estabelecer um mecanismo para melhorar a coordenação da assistência ao sector da segurança e exigir que todos os pedidos para tal ajuda venham através do ministério da defesa e segurança.

18. Considerar o condicionamento da assistência ao sector da segurança a progressos nas áreas chave da reforma legislativa, bem como ao desenvolvimento duma política de segurança nacional e à implementação das recomendações da CoI.

Dili/Bruxelas, 17 Janeiro 2008

(View full report here)
(Ver relatório completo aqui)

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.