terça-feira, janeiro 22, 2008

Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao accused of instigating 2006 political crisis in East Timor

World Socialist Web Site

By Patrick O’Connor
22 January 2008


Former East Timorese major Alfredo Reinado has accused Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao of directly instigating the 2006 military mutiny, which triggered the political and social unrest that forced more than 100,000 people—10 percent of the population—to flee their homes. The violence was seized upon by Canberra as the pretext for dispatching an Australian-led military intervention and muscling former Fretilin prime minister Mari Alkatiri out of office.

The 2006 events unfolded as part of a “regime change” operation orchestrated by the former Australian government of John Howard and by Fretilin’s domestic political opponents. Canberra regarded the Alkatiri administration as being too closely aligned to strategic rivals, Portugal and China, and resented the concessions it had been forced to make during negotiations over the exploitation of the Greater Sunrise oil and gas field. Fretilin, a bourgeois nationalist organisation, was also opposed by rival sections of the Timorese elite. Its limited promises of social reform were viewed with hostility by business and landowning interests, particularly those with connections to the former Indonesian occupying forces, while the powerful Catholic Church resisted the Alkatiri government’s support for a separation between church and state.

Gusmao has long played a leading role in the political manoeuvres of these right-wing forces. But his public response to the 2006 crisis was particularly provocative. On March 23 he delivered a nationally televised speech in which he denounced Fretilin as corrupt and dictatorial, and stoked up regional resentments by accusing the government of favouring people from the eastern districts where Fretilin draws most of its support. The speech sparked widespread violence, marking a critical turning point in the crisis. The unrest became the pretext in May for the dispatch of Australian troops. In June, Gusmao—utilising a scurrilous documentary produced by the Australian ABC program “Four Corners” that falsely accused Alkatiri of arming a “hit squad” to assassinate his political opponents—then publicly threatened to resign as president unless Alkatiri stepped down. When Alkatiri eventually obliged, he was succeeded as prime minister by Gusmao’s close ally Jose Ramos-Horta.

Gusmao now stands accused not just of exploiting the soldiers’ mutiny for his own ends, but of direct responsibility for the crisis. Alfredo Reinado was one of the central figures in the military split. In April and May 2006, violent protests erupted in Dili in support of nearly 600 soldiers (known as the “petitioners”) who had abandoned their barracks after accusing the Alkatiri government of discriminating against Timorese from the western regions of the country. Reinado, the commander of East Timor’s military police, participated in some of the most violent clashes, including an unprovoked ambush on government soldiers and police. Currently facing eight murder charges and ten counts of attempted murder, Reinado and his armed followers have based themselves in the regional western districts and refused to accede to Gusmao’s demands to turn themselves in.

Negotiations between the East Timorese government and Reinado over the terms of the former major’s surrender appear to have broken down, provoking the public allegations against Gusmao.

Reinado recently recorded a video message that has been circulated on DVD in East Timor and released, in part, on the Internet. “I give my testimony as a witness, that Xanana is the main author of this crisis, he cannot lie or deny about this,” the former major declared. “Many things will happen backstage and he knows about that, it’s his responsibility and his links. He calls us bad people, but it’s him that created us, turned us to be like this—he is author of the petition. He was behind all of this... He turns against us, those ordered and created by him. It’s with his support that the petition exists in the first place, it’s his irresponsible speeches to the media that made people to be fighting and killing each other until this moment and he knows many more things—we will talk about this.”

Reinado is a dubious figure and his statement certainly cannot simply be taken on face value. He is yet to provide any supporting evidence. Nevertheless, his allegation dovetails with already-known information indicating that Gusmao was the leading Timorese figure in the calculated coup d’état against the democratically elected Fretilin administration.

Reinado is not the first person to have accused Gusmao of orchestrating violence. Former vice-commander of Dili’s district police, Abilio “Mausoko” Mesquita issued a statement after his arrest in 2006 alleging that Gusmao had ordered him to attack a house belonging to army Brigadier Taur Matan Ruak on May 25. Mesquita claims to have repeatedly told UN mission head Sukehiro Hasegawa that Gusmao was the author of the political crisis. Mesquita was sentenced to four years jail last August for his role in the attack on Brigadier Ruak’s house, despite Ruak asking the court to grant clemency and release him.

There is already evidence that Reinado had maintained communications with Gusmao as the crisis deepened in May 2006. On May 14 the two men met in Dili. On May 29—three days after the 1,300 Australian-led soldiers landed in East Timor—Gusmao sent Reinado a letter written on presidential letterhead which began with the greeting “Major Alfredo, Good Morning!” and encouraged him to pull back from the hills around the capital. “We have already combined with the Australian forces and you have to station yourself in Aileu,” it declared. Gusmao concluded with “embraces to all” and his signature. Senior staff at the Poussada lodge, where Reinado stayed for six weeks, told the Australian that Gusmao later paid Reinado’s hotel bill.

Significantly, Gusmao has refused to deny Reinado’s latest allegations. “I do not want to respond to this issue because there are legal implications and I do not want to engage in a war of words,” he declared on January 10. “Let whoever wants to scream about it scream... I am not paying any attention because I see it as irrelevant.”

The prime minister later issued an extraordinary threat to journalists in Dili covering the story. “You have to exercise more responsibility towards the environment of stability or instability,” he said last Tuesday. “We close our eyes when in the case of small and big things you go and interview Alfredo [Reinado]. Perhaps because of these things instability may emerge in the country—because of you—[so] we will arrest you.”

Former Prime Minister Alkatiri has demanded that Gusmao resign. “I never had any doubts that Xanana was behind, or in front of the crisis, and it was because of this that I have been saying right from the beginning that this has been a big conspiracy,” he said. “Now, because they are upset with one another Alfredo has revealed that this was in fact the case.”

These remarks stand in stark contrast to the way Alkatiri conducted himself during the 2006 crisis. The former prime minister then made no genuine attempt to expose the conspiracy against him, acquiesced to the Australian intervention, and resigned just as large numbers of Fretilin supporters began demonstrating in defence of his government. For Alkatiri and the Fretilin leadership, the prospect of a mass movement mobilised in defence of democratic rights developing beyond their control terrified them far more than a Gusmao-led right-wing coup.


Canberra’s role

The Australian media have buried Reinado’s allegations. The story was completely ignored for more than a week; only when the blackout could no longer be sustained did the broadsheet newspapers publish short reports describing Alkatiri’s demand that Gusmao resign and the prime minister’s threat to arrest Timorese journalists. Beyond this, however, there has been no detail and no analysis. This is certainly no accident or oversight. Almost every section of the media was complicit in Canberra’s destabilisation campaign against the Alkatiri administration. The press is now seeking to evade any serious examination of Gusmao’s role in the 2006 events because to do so would raise embarrassing questions about the former Howard government’s, and their own, involvement.

Gusmao has long-standing and close connections with Canberra. It is highly unlikely he would have moved against the Alkatiri administration without prior backing from Howard.

It is equally unlikely that Canberra was caught unaware by the split within the Timorese military. As the World Socialist Web Site noted in July 2006: “Given its long record of intrigue, there is no doubt that Australia had a direct hand in the political events leading up to its May 24 military intervention. The Howard government’s close relations with Gusmao and Ramos-Horta were undoubtedly augmented by a network of contacts established by Australian diplomatic staff, military personnel and intelligence operatives in Dili with opposition politicians, rebel soldiers and police, and even gang leaders. Canberra not only knew who was involved in the army protests in March, but, in all likelihood, encouraged them.”

Reinado’s claim that Gusmao was behind the “petitioners” uprising again raises questions regarding the former major’s Australian connections. Reinado lived in Australia in the 1990s, and his wife and children still reside in Perth. He returned to East Timor in 1999, and after joining the country’s armed forces, received military training in Canberra.

When Australian troops landed in Timor in May 2006, they made no effort to detain Reinado. SAS forces accompanied him to the hotel outside Dili where he stayed for six weeks, issuing regular denunciations of the Fretilin government and public messages of support for the Australian-led intervention force. In July, Portuguese police arrested Reinado in Dili on weapons charges. The illegal arms were being stored in a house directly opposite an Australian military base. A month later Reinado somehow managed to walk out of the Dili prison, which was being guarded by Australian and New Zealand forces.

After negotiations between Reinado and Ramos-Horta faltered over the terms of the former major’s surrender, Horta authorised an Australian military raid. The Howard government dispatched an additional 100 SAS troops for the operation on March 4, 2007 in which Australian and New Zealand forces attacked the former major’s base in the central mountain town of Same. Five of his followers were shot dead, although Reinado and the rest of his men somehow managed to escape. It has never been explained how the elite forces failed to apprehend Reinado. The only plausible explanation is that the operation was never aimed at capturing him.

In the aftermath of the raid, Australian military spokespeople ludicrously declared that the SAS remained “on the hunt” for Reinado but were unable to locate him. The former major meanwhile continued to grant interviews to TV crews and other media personnel. Remarkably, he declared that he did not blame Australian forces for killing five of his men and still supported the foreign military presence in East Timor.

Australian commander of the International Stabilisation Force (ISF) in East Timor, John Hutchison, confirmed last Wednesday that his forces would not arrest Reinado. Hutchison reportedly told a press conference in Dili that the Australian military does “not want to intervene in the internal problems” of East Timor. This remark merely underscores the depth of Canberra’s cynicism. The Fretilin leadership has complained that the ISF’s refusal to move against Reinado violates an active arrest warrant issued by the courts and rests on nothing but an arbitrary order of President Ramos-Horta, who has called for further negotiations.

The standoff is heightening opposition towards the Australian-led occupation within the East Timorese population. Australian Catholic priest Father Frank Brennan, a former director of the Jesuit Refugee Service in East Timor, warned last month: “There is a growing perception among local critics of the Timor government that the Australian troops are the personal troops of the president given their presence without full constitutional mandate and their ready response to Horta’s arbitrary command, which showed little respect for the traditional separation of powers between the executive and the judiciary.”

Popular hostility will only increase as the neo-colonial character of the Australian-led intervention becomes ever more apparent. Newly-elected Labor Prime Minister Kevin Rudd visited East Timor last month and pledged to maintain the Australian presence until at least 2009. However, the operation will almost certainly last much longer. President Ramos-Horta told the Australian that he expects the UN mission, backed by the Australian military, to continue until at least 2011.

The Australian Strategic Policy Institute has encouraged the Rudd government to go even further and look to install Australian personnel directly into East Timor’s state apparatus, as Canberra has done in other South Pacific countries. A report issued last November titled “After the 2006 Crisis: Australian interests in Timor-Leste” stated: “Expatriates in critical posts like chief of police, prosecutor general, and senior court appointments could provide a circuit-breaker from political interference as well as promote professional development and an ethos of public service complementing the political and economic advice and audits provided by UN missions and the IMF.”

That the prospect of an Australian takeover of East Timor’s police force and judiciary is now being actively discussed serves to demonstrate the real character of the tiny impoverished country’s so-called “independence”.

The WSWS invites your comments.

TRADUÇÃO:

Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão acusado de instigar a crise política de 2006 em Timor-Leste

World Socialist Web Site

Por Patrick O’Connor
22 Janeiro 2008


O antigo major Timorense Alfredo Reinado acusou o Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão de ter instigado directamente o motim militar de 2006, que desencadeou o desassossego político e social que forçou mais de 100,000 pessoas—10 por cento da população—a fugir das suas casas. A violência foi aproveitada por Canberra como o pretexto para despachar uma força de militar de intervenção liderada pelos Australianos e remover pela força o antigo primeiro-ministro da Fretilin Mari Alkatiri.

Os eventos de 2006 desdobraram-se como parte duma operação de “mudança de regime” orquestrada pelo antigo governo Australiano de John Howard e pelos opositores políticos domésticos da Fretilin. Canberra considerava a administração Alkatiri como estando alinhada demasiado próxima de rivais estratégicos, Portugal e China, e ressentiu as concessões que fora forçada a fazer durante as negociações da exploração do campo de gás e petróleo do Greater Sunrise. A Fretilin, uma organização nacionalista pequeno-burguesa, era também oposta por facções rivais da elite Timorense. As suas promessas limitadas de reforma social eram vistas com hostilidade pelos interesses dos negócios e dos proprietários de terras, particularmente os que tinham conexões com as antigas forças ocupantes Indonésias, com a poderosa igreja católica a resistir ao apoio do governo de Alkatiri à separação entre a igreja e o Estado.

Gusmão há muito tempo que tinha um papel de líder nas manobras políticas dessas forças da ala direita. Mas foi particularmente provocador na sua resposta à crise de 2006. Em 23 de Março ele fez um discurso à nação pela televisão no qual denunciou a Fretilin como corrupta e ditatorial, e aumentou ressentimentos regionais ao acusar o governo de favorecer as pessoas dos distritos do leste onde a Fretilin tem a maioria do seu apoio. O discurso desencadeou violência alargada, marcando um ponto sério de viragem na crise. O desassossego tornou-se o pretexto em Maio para o destacar das tropas Australianas. Em Junho, Gusmão — utilizando um indecente documentário produzido pelo programa “Four Corners” da ABC Australiana que falsamente acusou Alkatiri de armar um “esquadrão de ataque” para assassinar os seus opositores políticos — ameaçou então publicamente resignar do cargo de presidente anão ser que Alkatiri saísse. Quando Alkatiri eventualmente condescendeu, foi sucedido no cargo de primeiro-ministro por Jose Ramos-Horta, aliado chegado de Gusmão.

Gusmão é agora acusado não apenas de explorar o motim dos soldados para benefício próprio, mas de responsabilidade directa na crise. Alfredo Reinado foi uma das figuras centrais da divisão militar. Em Abril e Maio de 2006, irromperam protestos violentos em Dili em apoio de quase de 600 soldados (conhecidos como os “peticionários”) que tinham abandonado os seus quartéis depois de acusarem o governo de Alkatiri de discriminar contra os Timorenses das regiões do oeste do país. Reinado, o comandante da polícia militar de Timor-Leste, participou nalguns dos confrontos mais violentos, incluindo uma emboscada não provocada a soldados e polícias do governo. A enfrentar correntemente oito acusações de homicídio e de dez tentativas de homicídio, Reinado e os seus seguidores armados acantonaram-se eles próprios nos distritos da região oeste e recusam ceder aos pedidos de Gusmão para se entregarem.

Negociações entre o governo Timorense e Reinado sobre os termos de rendição do antigo major parecem terem-se quebrado, provocando as alegações públicas contra Gusmão.

Reinado gravou recentemente uma mensagem em video que tem andado a circular em DVD em Timor-Leste e emitido, em parte, na Internet. “Dou o meu testemunho, como testemunha, que Xanana é o autor principal desta crise, ele não pode mentir ou negar isto,” declarou o antigo major. “Muitas coisas aconteceram nos bastidores e ele sabe disso, a responsabilidade e as ligações são suas. Ele chama.nos pessoas más, mas foi ele quem nos criou, que nos transformou naquilo que somos — é ele o autor da petição. Ele esteve por detrás disto tudo... ele virou-se contra nós, estes a quem ele deu ordens e que foram criados por ele. Foi com o seu apoio que petição existiu em primeiro lugar, foram os seus discursos irresponsáveis para os media que fizeram com que muita gente fosse lutar e matar-se uns aos outros até esta altura e ele sabe de muitas mais coisas — havemos de falar disso.”

Reinado é uma figura dúbia e as suas declarações não podem ser certamente tomadas como valor nominal. Ele não apresentou ainda evidência que as suporte. Contudo, as suas alegações juntamente com informações já bem conhecidas indicam que Gusmão foi a figura Timorense de topo do golpe de Estado planeado contra a administração da Fretilin eleita democraticamente.

Reinado não é a primeira pessoa a ter acusado Gusmão de ter orquestrado a violência. O antigo vice-comandante da polícia do distrito de Dili, Abilio “Mausoko” Mesquita emitiu uma declaração depois da sua prisão em 2006 alegando que Gusmão lhe tinha dado ordens para atacar a casa que pertence ao Brigadeiro da força armada Taur Matan Ruak em 25 de Maio. Mesquita afirma ter ditos repetidamente ao responsável da missão da ONU Sukehiro Hasegawa que Gusmão for a o autor da crise política. Mesquita foi condenado a quatro anos de prisão em Agosto passado pelo seu papel no ataque à casa do Brigadeiro Ruak, apesar de Ruak ter pedido ao tribunal para lhe perdoar e libertar.

Há já evidência que Reinado tinha mantido comunicações com Gusmão quando a crise se aprofundou em Maio de 2006. Em 14 de Maio os dois homens encontraram-se em Dili. Em 29 de Maio — três dias depois de 1,300 soldados liderados pelos Australianos terem aterrado em Timor-Leste — Gusmão mandou uma carta a Reinado em papel com timbre presidencial que começava com a saudação “Bom dia Major Alfredo!” e o encorajava a sair dos montes à volta da capital. “Já combinámos com as forças Australianas e deve acantonar-se em Aileu,” dizia. Gusmão concluiu com “abraços para todos” e a sua assinatura. Pessoal de topo da Pousada, onde Reinado ficou durante seis semanas, disseram ao The Australian que foi Gusmão quem mais tarde pagou a conta de hotel de Reinado.

Significativamente, Gusmão tem-se recusado a negar as últimas alegações de Reinado. “Não quero responder a essa questão porque há implicações legais e não quero engajar-me numa guerra de palavras ,” declarou ele em 16 de Janeiro. “Deixemos gritar sobre isso quem quiser gritar... não presto nenhuma atenção a isso porque vejo que isso é irrelevante.”

Mais tarde o primeiro-ministro emitiu uma ameaça extraordinária contra os jornalistas que em Dili cobriam a história. “Têm de exercer mais responsabilidade em relação a um ambiente de estabilidade ou instabilidade,” disse na Terça-feira passada. “fechamos os olhos no caso de coisas pequenas e grandes quando vão entrevistar Alfredo [Reinado]. Se talvez por causa destas coisas a instabilidade emergir no país — por causa de vocês—[então] prendê-los-emos.”

O antigo Primeiro-Ministro Alkatiri pediu que Gusmão resigne. “Nunca tive qualquer dúvida que Xanana estava por detrás, ou à frente da crise, e é por causa disso que tenho estado a dizer desde o princípio que isto tem sido uma grande conspiração,” disse. “Agora, como estão aborrecidos um com o outro Alfredo revelou que este era de facto o caso.”

Estes comentários estão em total contraste com o modo como Alkatiri se conduziu ele próprio durante a crise de 2006. Então, o antigo primeiro-ministro não fez nenhuma tentativa genuína para expor a conspiração contra ele, aceitou a intervenção Australiana, e resignou logo que um grande número de apoiantes da Fretilin começaram a manifestar-se em defesa do seu governo. Para Alkatiri e para a liderança da Fretilin, a perspectiva de um movimento de massas mobilizado em defesa de direitos democráticos se desenvolver para além do seu controlo aterrorizou-os mais do que o golpe da direita liderado por Gusmão.


Papel de Canberra

Os media Australianos enterraram as alegações de Reinado. A história foi completamente ignorada durante mais de uma semana; apenas quando não se pode aguentar mais o silenciamento é que os jornais publicaram relatos curtos descrevendo a exigência de Alkatiri para Gusmão resignar do cargo de primeiro-ministro e a ameaça de prender jornalistas Timorenses. Para além disto, contudo, não tem havido nem detalhes nem análises. Isto não acontece nem por acidente nem por descuido. Quase todas as secções dos media foram cúmplices com a campanha de desestabilização de Canberra contra a administração de Alkatiri. Agora a imprensa está a procurar evadir-se de qualquer exame sério ao papel de Gusmão nos eventos de 2006 porque fazê-lo levantaria questões embaraçosas acerca do antigo governo de Howard e do seu próprio envolvimento.

Gusmão tem conexões com Camberra desde há muito e estreitas . É altamente improvável que tivesse agido contra a administração de Alkatiri sem respaldo prévio de Howard.

É igualmente improvável que Canberra tenha sido apanhada desprevenida pela divisão no seio das forças militares Timorenses. Como World Socialist Web Site anotou em Julho de 2006: “Dado o seu longo historial de intriga, não há dúvida de que a Austrália teve uma mão directa nos eventos políticos que levaram à sua intervenção militar em 24 de Maio. As relações estreitas do governo de Howard com Gusmão e Ramos-Horta eram sem dúvidas aumentadas por uma rede de contactos estabelecidos por pessoal diplomático Australiano, pessoal militar e operacionais dos serviços de informações em Dili com políticos da oposição, soldados e polícias amotinados e mesmo líderes de gangues. Canberra não apenas conhecia quem estava envolvido nos protestos das forças armadas em Março, mas, com toda a probabilidade encorajou-os.”

A afirmação de Reinado de que Gusmão estava por detrás do levantamento dos “peticionários” levanta mais uma vez questões sobre as conexões Australianas do antigo major. Reinado viveu na Austrália nos anos 1990s, e a sua mulher e filhos residem ainda em Perth. Regressou a Timor-Leste em 1999, e depois de se juntar às forças armadas do país, recebeu formação militar em Canberra.

Quando as tropas Australianas aterraram em Timor em Maio de 2006, não fizeram nenhum esforço para deter Reinado. Forças SAS acompanharam-no no hotel for a de Dili onde esteve alojado durante seis semanas, emitindo denúncias regulares contra o governo da Fretilin e mensagens públicas de apoio à força de intervenção liderada pelos Australianos. Em Julho, a polícia Portuguesa prendeu Reinado em Dili com acusações de armas. As armas ilegais estavam armazenadas numa casa mesmo em frente à base militar Australiana. Um mês depois Reinado conseguiu sair pelo seu pé da prisão de Dili, que estava a ser guardada pelas forças Australianas e da Nova Zelândia.

Depois de negociações entre Reinado e Ramos-Horta falharem por causa dos termos para a rendição do antigo major, Horta autorizou que um assalto pelos militares Australianos. O governo de Howard despachou mais 100 tropas SAS para a operação em 4 de Março de 2007 onde forças Australianas e da Nova Zelândia atacaram a base do antigo major na cidade de Same nas montanhas do centro. Cinco dos seus seguidores foram mortos a tiro, apesar de Reinado e do resto dos seus homens terem conseguido escapar. Nunca foi explicado como é que as forças de elite falharam em apanhar Reinado. A única explicação plausível é que a operação nunca visou capturá-lo.

Depois do assalto, o porta-voz militar Australiano declarou enganosamente que as SAS se mantinham “na perseguição” a Reinado mas que eram incapazes de o localizar. Contudo o antigo major continuou a dar entrevistas a equipas de TV e a outro pessoal dos media. Extraordináriamente, ele declarou que não culpava as forças Australianas por terem matado cinco dos seus homens e que apoiava ainda a presença militar estrangeira em Timor-Leste.

O comandante Australiano da Força Internacional de Estabilização (ISF) em Timor-Leste, John Hutchison, confirmou na Quarta-feira passada que as suas forças não prenderiam Reinado. Disse Hutchison numa conferência de imprensa em Dili que os militares Australianos “não querem intervir nos problemas internos” de Timor-Leste. Este comentário apenas ressalta a profundidade do cinismo de Canberra. A liderança da Fretilin tem-se queixado que a recusa do ISF em agir contra Reinado viola um mandato de captura emitido pelos tribunais e repousa em nada a não ser numa ordem arbitrária do Presidente Ramos-Horta, que tem pedido mais negociações.

O finca-pé tem aumentado a oposição contra a ocupação liderada pelos Australianos no seio da população Timorense. O padre católico Australiano Frank Brennan, um antigo director do Jesuit Refugee Service em Timor-Leste, avisou o mês passado: “Há uma percepção crescente entre os críticos locais do governo de Timor que as tropas Australianas sãs as tropas pessoais do presidente dada a sua presença sem mandato constitucional e a sua resposta pronta ao comando arbitrário de Horta, que mostrou pouco respeito pela tradicional separação de poderes entre o executivo e o judicial.”

A hostilidade popular apenas aumentará à medida que o carácter neo-colonial da intervenção liderada pelos Australianos se tornar cada vez mais aparente. O acabado de eleger Primeiro-Ministro do Labor Kevin Rudd visitou Timor-Leste no mês passado e prometeu manter a presença Australiana até pelo menos 2009. Contudo, quase de certeza que a operação durará muito mais. O Presidente Ramos-Horta disse ao The Australian que espera que a missão da ONU, respaldada pelos militares Australianos, continue até 2011 pelo menos.

O Instituto Australiano de Política Estratégica encorajou o governo de Rudd a ir ainda mais longe e tentar instalar pessoal Australiano directamente no aparelho de Estado de Timor-Leste, como Canberra tem feito noutros países do Sul do Pacífico. Um relatório emitido em Novembro passado com o título “Depois da Crise de 2006: interesses Australianos em Timor-Leste” afirmava: “Expatriados em cargos críticos como chefes da polícia, procurador-geral, e nomeações de topo nos tribunais podem pôr um travão na interferência política e promover o desenvolvimento profissional e uma ética de serviço público completando os conselhos políticos e económicos e as auditorias providenciadas pela ONU e pelo FMI.”

Que a perspectiva duma tomada de poder Australiana da força da polícia e do sector judicial de Timor-Leste não estejam a ser discutidas activamente serve para demonstrar o carácter real da chamada “independência” do pequeno país empobrecido.

O WSWS convida-o a fazer comentários.

3 comentários:

Margarida disse...

Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão acusado de instigar a crise política de 2006 em Timor-Leste
World Socialist Web Site

Por Patrick O’Connor
22 Janeiro 2008


O antigo major Timorense Alfredo Reinado acusou o Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão de ter instigado directamente o motim militar de 2006, que desencadeou o desassossego político e social que forçou mais de 100,000 pessoas—10 por cento da população—a fugir das suas casas. A violência foi aproveitada por Canberra como o pretexto para despachar uma força de militar de intervenção liderada pelos Australianos e remover pela força o antigo primeiro-ministro da Fretilin Mari Alkatiri.

Os eventos de 2006 desdobraram-se como parte duma operação de “mudança de regime” orquestrada pelo antigo governo Australiano de John Howard e pelos opositores políticos domésticos da Fretilin. Canberra considerava a administração Alkatiri como estando alinhada demasiado próxima de rivais estratégicos, Portugal e China, e ressentiu as concessões que fora forçada a fazer durante as negociações da exploração do campo de gás e petróleo do Greater Sunrise. A Fretilin, uma organização nacionalista pequeno-burguesa, era também oposta por facções rivais da elite Timorense. As suas promessas limitadas de reforma social eram vistas com hostilidade pelos interesses dos negócios e dos proprietários de terras, particularmente os que tinham conexões com as antigas forças ocupantes Indonésias, com a poderosa igreja católica a resistir ao apoio do governo de Alkatiri à separação entre a igreja e o Estado.

Gusmão há muito tempo que tinha um papel de líder nas manobras políticas dessas forças da ala direita. Mas foi particularmente provocador na sua resposta à crise de 2006. Em 23 de Março ele fez um discurso à nação pela televisão no qual denunciou a Fretilin como corrupta e ditatorial, e aumentou ressentimentos regionais ao acusar o governo de favorecer as pessoas dos distritos do leste onde a Fretilin tem a maioria do seu apoio. O discurso desencadeou violência alargada, marcando um ponto sério de viragem na crise. O desassossego tornou-se o pretexto em Maio para o destacar das tropas Australianas. Em Junho, Gusmão — utilizando um indecente documentário produzido pelo programa “Four Corners” da ABC Australiana que falsamente acusou Alkatiri de armar um “esquadrão de ataque” para assassinar os seus opositores políticos — ameaçou então publicamente resignar do cargo de presidente anão ser que Alkatiri saísse. Quando Alkatiri eventualmente condescendeu, foi sucedido no cargo de primeiro-ministro por Jose Ramos-Horta, aliado chegado de Gusmão.

Gusmão é agora acusado não apenas de explorar o motim dos soldados para benefício próprio, mas de responsabilidade directa na crise. Alfredo Reinado foi uma das figuras centrais da divisão militar. Em Abril e Maio de 2006, irromperam protestos violentos em Dili em apoio de quase de 600 soldados (conhecidos como os “peticionários”) que tinham abandonado os seus quartéis depois de acusarem o governo de Alkatiri de discriminar contra os Timorenses das regiões do oeste do país. Reinado, o comandante da polícia militar de Timor-Leste, participou nalguns dos confrontos mais violentos, incluindo uma emboscada não provocada a soldados e polícias do governo. A enfrentar correntemente oito acusações de homicídio e de dez tentativas de homicídio, Reinado e os seus seguidores armados acantonaram-se eles próprios nos distritos da região oeste e recusam ceder aos pedidos de Gusmão para se entregarem.

Negociações entre o governo Timorense e Reinado sobre os termos de rendição do antigo major parecem terem-se quebrado, provocando as alegações públicas contra Gusmão.

Reinado gravou recentemente uma mensagem em video que tem andado a circular em DVD em Timor-Leste e emitido, em parte, na Internet. “Dou o meu testemunho, como testemunha, que Xanana é o autor principal desta crise, ele não pode mentir ou negar isto,” declarou o antigo major. “Muitas coisas aconteceram nos bastidores e ele sabe disso, a responsabilidade e as ligações são suas. Ele chama.nos pessoas más, mas foi ele quem nos criou, que nos transformou naquilo que somos — é ele o autor da petição. Ele esteve por detrás disto tudo... ele virou-se contra nós, estes a quem ele deu ordens e que foram criados por ele. Foi com o seu apoio que petição existiu em primeiro lugar, foram os seus discursos irresponsáveis para os media que fizeram com que muita gente fosse lutar e matar-se uns aos outros até esta altura e ele sabe de muitas mais coisas — havemos de falar disso.”

Reinado é uma figura dúbia e as suas declarações não podem ser certamente tomadas como valor nominal. Ele não apresentou ainda evidência que as suporte. Contudo, as suas alegações juntamente com informações já bem conhecidas indicam que Gusmão foi a figura Timorense de topo do golpe de Estado planeado contra a administração da Fretilin eleita democraticamente.

Reinado não é a primeira pessoa a ter acusado Gusmão de ter orquestrado a violência. O antigo vice-comandante da polícia do distrito de Dili, Abilio “Mausoko” Mesquita emitiu uma declaração depois da sua prisão em 2006 alegando que Gusmão lhe tinha dado ordens para atacar a casa que pertence ao Brigadeiro da força armada Taur Matan Ruak em 25 de Maio. Mesquita afirma ter ditos repetidamente ao responsável da missão da ONU Sukehiro Hasegawa que Gusmão for a o autor da crise política. Mesquita foi condenado a quatro anos de prisão em Agosto passado pelo seu papel no ataque à casa do Brigadeiro Ruak, apesar de Ruak ter pedido ao tribunal para lhe perdoar e libertar.

Há já evidência que Reinado tinha mantido comunicações com Gusmão quando a crise se aprofundou em Maio de 2006. Em 14 de Maio os dois homens encontraram-se em Dili. Em 29 de Maio — três dias depois de 1,300 soldados liderados pelos Australianos terem aterrado em Timor-Leste — Gusmão mandou uma carta a Reinado em papel com timbre presidencial que começava com a saudação “Bom dia Major Alfredo!” e o encorajava a sair dos montes à volta da capital. “Já combinámos com as forças Australianas e deve acantonar-se em Aileu,” dizia. Gusmão concluiu com “abraços para todos” e a sua assinatura. Pessoal de topo da Pousada, onde Reinado ficou durante seis semanas, disseram ao The Australian que foi Gusmão quem mais tarde pagou a conta de hotel de Reinado.

Significativamente, Gusmão tem-se recusado a negar as últimas alegações de Reinado. “Não quero responder a essa questão porque há implicações legais e não quero engajar-me numa guerra de palavras ,” declarou ele em 16 de Janeiro. “Deixemos gritar sobre isso quem quiser gritar... não presto nenhuma atenção a isso porque vejo que isso é irrelevante.”

Mais tarde o primeiro-ministro emitiu uma ameaça extraordinária contra os jornalistas que em Dili cobriam a história. “Têm de exercer mais responsabilidade em relação a um ambiente de estabilidade ou instabilidade,” disse na Terça-feira passada. “fechamos os olhos no caso de coisas pequenas e grandes quando vão entrevistar Alfredo [Reinado]. Se talvez por causa destas coisas a instabilidade emergir no país — por causa de vocês—[então] prendê-los-emos.”

O antigo Primeiro-Ministro Alkatiri pediu que Gusmão resigne. “Nunca tive qualquer dúvida que Xanana estava por detrás, ou à frente da crise, e é por causa disso que tenho estado a dizer desde o princípio que isto tem sido uma grande conspiração,” disse. “Agora, como estão aborrecidos um com o outro Alfredo revelou que este era de facto o caso.”

Estes comentários estão em total contraste com o modo como Alkatiri se conduziu ele próprio durante a crise de 2006. Então, o antigo primeiro-ministro não fez nenhuma tentativa genuína para expor a conspiração contra ele, aceitou a intervenção Australiana, e resignou logo que um grande número de apoiantes da Fretilin começaram a manifestar-se em defesa do seu governo. Para Alkatiri e para a liderança da Fretilin, a perspectiva de um movimento de massas mobilizado em defesa de direitos democráticos se desenvolver para além do seu controlo aterrorizou-os mais do que o golpe da direita liderado por Gusmão.


Papel de Canberra

Os media Australianos enterraram as alegações de Reinado. A história foi completamente ignorada durante mais de uma semana; apenas quando não se pode aguentar mais o silenciamento é que os jornais publicaram relatos curtos descrevendo a exigência de Alkatiri para Gusmão resignar do cargo de primeiro-ministro e a ameaça de prender jornalistas Timorenses. Para além disto, contudo, não tem havido nem detalhes nem análises. Isto não acontece nem por acidente nem por descuido. Quase todas as secções dos media foram cúmplices com a campanha de desestabilização de Canberra contra a administração de Alkatiri. Agora a imprensa está a procurar evadir-se de qualquer exame sério ao papel de Gusmão nos eventos de 2006 porque fazê-lo levantaria questões embaraçosas acerca do antigo governo de Howard e do seu próprio envolvimento.

Gusmão tem conexões com Camberra desde há muito e estreitas . É altamente improvável que tivesse agido contra a administração de Alkatiri sem respaldo prévio de Howard.

É igualmente improvável que Canberra tenha sido apanhada desprevenida pela divisão no seio das forças militares Timorenses. Como World Socialist Web Site anotou em Julho de 2006: “Dado o seu longo historial de intriga, não há dúvida de que a Austrália teve uma mão directa nos eventos políticos que levaram à sua intervenção militar em 24 de Maio. As relações estreitas do governo de Howard com Gusmão e Ramos-Horta eram sem dúvidas aumentadas por uma rede de contactos estabelecidos por pessoal diplomático Australiano, pessoal militar e operacionais dos serviços de informações em Dili com políticos da oposição, soldados e polícias amotinados e mesmo líderes de gangues. Canberra não apenas conhecia quem estava envolvido nos protestos das forças armadas em Março, mas, com toda a probabilidade encorajou-os.”

A afirmação de Reinado de que Gusmão estava por detrás do levantamento dos “peticionários” levanta mais uma vez questões sobre as conexões Australianas do antigo major. Reinado viveu na Austrália nos anos 1990s, e a sua mulher e filhos residem ainda em Perth. Regressou a Timor-Leste em 1999, e depois de se juntar às forças armadas do país, recebeu formação militar em Canberra.

Quando as tropas Australianas aterraram em Timor em Maio de 2006, não fizeram nenhum esforço para deter Reinado. Forças SAS acompanharam-no no hotel for a de Dili onde esteve alojado durante seis semanas, emitindo denúncias regulares contra o governo da Fretilin e mensagens públicas de apoio à força de intervenção liderada pelos Australianos. Em Julho, a polícia Portuguesa prendeu Reinado em Dili com acusações de armas. As armas ilegais estavam armazenadas numa casa mesmo em frente à base militar Australiana. Um mês depois Reinado conseguiu sair pelo seu pé da prisão de Dili, que estava a ser guardada pelas forças Australianas e da Nova Zelândia.

Depois de negociações entre Reinado e Ramos-Horta falharem por causa dos termos para a rendição do antigo major, Horta autorizou que um assalto pelos militares Australianos. O governo de Howard despachou mais 100 tropas SAS para a operação em 4 de Março de 2007 onde forças Australianas e da Nova Zelândia atacaram a base do antigo major na cidade de Same nas montanhas do centro. Cinco dos seus seguidores foram mortos a tiro, apesar de Reinado e do resto dos seus homens terem conseguido escapar. Nunca foi explicado como é que as forças de elite falharam em apanhar Reinado. A única explicação plausível é que a operação nunca visou capturá-lo.

Depois do assalto, o porta-voz militar Australiano declarou enganosamente que as SAS se mantinham “na perseguição” a Reinado mas que eram incapazes de o localizar. Contudo o antigo major continuou a dar entrevistas a equipas de TV e a outro pessoal dos media. Extraordináriamente, ele declarou que não culpava as forças Australianas por terem matado cinco dos seus homens e que apoiava ainda a presença militar estrangeira em Timor-Leste.

O comandante Australiano da Força Internacional de Estabilização (ISF) em Timor-Leste, John Hutchison, confirmou na Quarta-feira passada que as suas forças não prenderiam Reinado. Disse Hutchison numa conferência de imprensa em Dili que os militares Australianos “não querem intervir nos problemas internos” de Timor-Leste. Este comentário apenas ressalta a profundidade do cinismo de Canberra. A liderança da Fretilin tem-se queixado que a recusa do ISF em agir contra Reinado viola um mandato de captura emitido pelos tribunais e repousa em nada a não ser numa ordem arbitrária do Presidente Ramos-Horta, que tem pedido mais negociações.

O finca-pé tem aumentado a oposição contra a ocupação liderada pelos Australianos no seio da população Timorense. O padre católico Australiano Frank Brennan, um antigo director do Jesuit Refugee Service em Timor-Leste, avisou o mês passado: “Há uma percepção crescente entre os críticos locais do governo de Timor que as tropas Australianas sãs as tropas pessoais do presidente dada a sua presença sem mandato constitucional e a sua resposta pronta ao comando arbitrário de Horta, que mostrou pouco respeito pela tradicional separação de poderes entre o executivo e o judicial.”

A hostilidade popular apenas aumentará à medida que o carácter neo-colonial da intervenção liderada pelos Australianos se tornar cada vez mais aparente. O acabado de eleger Primeiro-Ministro do Labor Kevin Rudd visitou Timor-Leste no mês passado e prometeu manter a presença Australiana até pelo menos 2009. Contudo, quase de certeza que a operação durará muito mais. O Presidente Ramos-Horta disse ao The Australian que espera que a missão da ONU, respaldada pelos militares Australianos, continue até 2011 pelo menos.

O Instituto Australiano de Política Estratégica encorajou o governo de Rudd a ir ainda mais longe e tentar instalar pessoal Australiano directamente no aparelho de Estado de Timor-Leste, como Canberra tem feito noutros países do Sul do Pacífico. Um relatório emitido em Novembro passado com o título “Depois da Crise de 2006: interesses Australianos em Timor-Leste” afirmava: “Expatriados em cargos críticos como chefes da polícia, procurador-geral, e nomeações de topo nos tribunais podem pôr um travão na interferência política e promover o desenvolvimento profissional e uma ética de serviço público completando os conselhos políticos e económicos e as auditorias providenciadas pela ONU e pelo FMI.”

Que a perspectiva duma tomada de poder Australiana da força da polícia e do sector judicial de Timor-Leste não estejam a ser discutidas activamente serve para demonstrar o carácter real da chamada “independência” do pequeno país empobrecido.

O WSWS convida a fazer comentários.

Aikurus disse...

Alo Dili

"The Australian Strategic Policy Institute". Sobre a politica de estabelecer em Timor Leste nao se pode comparar com os paises do pacifico.Uma presenca colonial sempre vimos como uma ocupacao. Saida dos portugueses e indonesia sera tambem a saida australiana. A FDTL e os policias timorenses nao estao interessados a presenca australiana.Lutamos 25 anos para independencia agora com outro colonialismo.Nao e tao facil conquistar os animos timorenses os indonesios fizeram tudo deram dinheiro,boas estradas sairam. O Jogo que estao a fazer com o Alfredo,Horta e Xanana nao estao a ser bem vistos.Nao precisamos da tropas australianas em Timor Leste.Temos bons comandantes da Policia de grande calibre sabemos o que queremos nao sermos escravos de olhos azuis e nao somos aborigenas totalmente dizimada.A politica de Iraque nao e para Timor Leste.Nunca caira na mente timorense Chefe da policia, Procurador Geral ou outros cargos ser um branco australiano.


Adeus

Margarida disse...

Aikurus eu acredito também no que diz mas é necessário continuar com estes esclarecimentos e ganhar mais povo para as ideias de defesa da soberania e da independência nacional. Repare que é mesmo isso o que o governo de facto quer - os estrangeiros a mandar nos postos chave - agora até entregou a uma agência da ONU a reforma do serviço público e a avaliação dos funcionários públicos, competências suas e de mais ninguém.

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.