sexta-feira, maio 16, 2008

East Timor: Rice rations for internal refugees cut off

WSWS, 15 May

Tens of thousands of East Timorese refugees, known as internally displaced persons, are threatened with starvation as international relief agencies cease provision of food aid to camps in the nation’s capital, Dili. Last month the World Food Program (WFP), a UN agency, cut off its regular rice rations to the refugee centres. In February the organisation had reduced the per-person monthly rice ration from eight to four kilograms.

The refugee camps were first set up after 150,000 people fled their homes as violence erupted in 2006. Two years later, 100,000 people—one-tenth of the entire population—remain classified as internally displaced people (IDPs). About 30,000 refugees live in camps in and outside of Dili, with the remaining 70,000 forced to take refuge with friends and family.

Conditions in the camps are appalling. A report released by the European-based International Crisis Group (ICG) on March 31, titled “Timor-Leste’s Displacement Crisis”, revealed some aspects of the situation.

The ICG stated: “The UN reports that the displacements have been accompanied by increased incidence of respiratory diseases, malaria, diarrhea and malnutrition—though the latter is ameliorated in the camps by the food distribution program. During the rains, some camps flood, while in others toilet blocks leak or overflow.... No action has been taken over camps identified in May and July 2007 studies as high priorities to be closed on the grounds of poor sanitation. The camps are a particularly problematic environment for women and children. The overcrowded tents and toilet block provide little privacy. Children are exposed to risks related to inadequate shelter and living conditions. Children, women, the elderly and other vulnerable groups are all at higher risk of exploitations for various forms of abuse—cases of prostitution and forced human trafficking have been reported.”

The report went on to highlight the extreme poverty experienced by people living in the camps: “The population of the camps is a cross-section of Timorese society. As in the population at large, unemployment levels are extremely high.... Each IDP with work is likely to be supporting a substantial number of relatives. For those without employment, little structured activity is available beyond participation in criminal activity and martial arts gangs.”

Many refugees are still too frightened to return to their homes after the violence of 2006, while others had their houses destroyed. For many people, however, the threat of hunger remains the main reason why they stay in the camps. East Timor remains one of the most impoverished nations in the world, with high unemployment and at least 40 percent of the population living below the official poverty line of 55 US cents per day.

Until last month, refugees and their families in the camps were at least provided with a basic food ration, even though women and children had to wait in line each month for up to six hours to receive their allotted four kilograms of rice and half litre of cooking oil.

The AFP interviewed several refugees at one makeshift camp in a converted convent in Dili where 7,000 people are now concentrated. Gregório Sousa and his son have been living in a tent for nearly two years. “I really want to go home as soon as possible, but I do not know where I could go after here,” Gregório said. “That is why I am still living here. If the government gives us the choice and helps us financially, I will return to my village.”

Filomena Soares has lived in the camp with her family since their home in the west of the country was set on fire during the unrest. “We don’t have a home to go back to,” she told the news agency. “Even if we wanted to leave, where would we go? We can’t just live under the stars. We are ready to go back if the state provides us with financial assistance to repair our home and make it livable again. Security is not a problem for us now, the people there want to welcome us back.”

The WFP has denied allegations that its decision to cut off food aid to the IDPs is aimed at dispersing the refugees and shutting down the camps. UN officials told the Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN) that a survey that they had conducted revealed that “only half of the 70,000 displaced registered in the camps and at host families were actually food insecure.” The WFP insisted that they were obliged to also assist those people who needed food aid but were not refugees. The agency, however, did not explain why they would not help all those in need in East Timor.

It is not clear to what extent the WFP was influenced by the escalating world price of food commodities, including rice. Since the start of 2006, largely as a result of financial speculation on world financial markets, the average price of food has risen 217 percent. This inflation has affected the WFP’s work in South-East Asia. In Cambodia, for example, the high price of rice has led to the suspension of a program providing free breakfasts to 450,000 poor schoolchildren. World food inflation has severely affected ordinary East Timorese. The country imports around 60 percent of its rice needs, and prices have spiraled in recent months. A report said that a 35-kilogram bag of rice sold for $US13 in February but now costs $US20, and in some remote areas $US27.
Spiraling inflation will further exacerbate the difficulties faced by the internally displaced people who are being forced to leave the camps.

The East Timorese government of Prime Minister Xanana Gusmão has failed to allocate any funds toward humanitarian food aid. State Secretary for Social Assistance Jacinto de Deus stated: “It’s something that the government should take over, but unfortunately we didn’t anticipate it during the budget discussion for 2008.” This lacks all credibility. The WFP’s decision to slash food aid had been expected, and the Gusmão government earlier supported the UN agency’s decision to cut rice rations in half. The reality is that the government has made no attempt to make up for the food aid shortfall because it wants to shut the refugee camps.

Similarly, no international aid donor, including Australia, has offered to provide the necessary funds to provide rice to the IDP centres. The Australian government and foreign policy establishment has long been openly discussing the need to disperse the camps, which are regarded as a potentially explosive source of social and political instability in the country. The recent International Crisis Group paper on the crisis follows numerous other reports that have warned of the unsustainability of leaving 10 percent of East Timor’s population as homeless internal refugees.

Previous attempts to close the IDP centres involved inducements—including an offer to subsidizes the rebuilding of refugees’ homes destroyed in 2006—and outright force and repression. In February 2007, Australian troops shot dead two refugees who were trying to prevent their camp near Dili airport being bulldozed by government and international security forces. With such methods failing to move the refugees on, they are going to be effectively starved out. Labor’s foreign minister Stephen Smith announced on May 1 an additional aid package of $30 million to the WFP, of which just $1 million has been allocated to East Timor. This sum is a drop in the ocean compared to the food needs of the East Timorese population and will certainly not make up for the cessation of the WFP’s rice ration program in the IDP camps.

All of this only further demonstrates the fraudulence of the Australian government’s claim that its operations in East Timor are based on a humanitarian concern for the population. Canberra expended significant resources on military-led interventions in 1999 and 2006 in order to shut out rival powers and ensure its ongoing control of the lucrative Timor Sea oil and gas reserves. The well-being of the population of “independent” East Timor has never been a factor in the operations of successive Liberal and Labor governments.

Tradução:

Timor-Leste: cortadas as rações de arroz para os deslocados

WSWS, 15 Maio
Dezenas de milhares de deslocados Timorenses estão ameaçados de morrer à fome depois das agências de socorro internacional terem cessado a entrega de ajuda alimentar em todos os campos na capital da nação, Dili. No mês passado o Programa Mundial de Alimentação (WFP), uma agência da ONU, cortou as suas rações regulares de arroz nos centros de deslocados. Em Fevereiro a organização tinha reduzido a ração mensal por pessoa de oito para quatro quilogramas.

Os campos de deslocados foram montados depois de mais de 150,000 pessoas terem fugido das suas casas quando irrompeu a violência em 2006. Dois anos mais tarde, 100,000 pessoas — um décimo da população — continua classificada como deslocada. Cerca de 30,000 deslocados vivem em campos no exterior de Dili, com os restantes 70,000 forçados a refugiarem-se com amigos e família.

As condições nos campos são horrorosas. Um relatório emitido pelo International Crisis Group (ICG) baseado na Europa em 31 de Março, intitulado “Crise de Deslocação em Timor-Leste”, revelou alguns aspectos da situação.

O ICG afirmava: “A ONU reporta que os deslocamentos foram acompanhados com a aumentada incidência de doenças respiratórias, malária, diarreia e má-nutrição — apesar da última ser aliviada nos campos pelo programa de distribuição de alimentos. Durante as chuvadas, alguns campos inundam, enquanto noutros os blocos sanitários pingam ou extravasam.... Não foi tomada qualquer acção em campos identificados em estudos de Maio e Julho de 2007 de alta prioridade para serem fechados com base nas deficientes condições sanitárias. Os campos têm um ambiente particularmente problemático para mulheres e crianças. As tendas e blocos sanitários sobrepovoados providenciam pouca privacidade. As crianças estão expostas a riscos relacionados com alojamento e condições de vida inadequados. Crianças, mulheres, idosos e outros grupos vulneráveis correm um risco maior de exploração de abusos de vários tipos — foram relatados casos de prostituição e de tráfico humano forçado.”

O relatório prosseguia a sublinhar a pobreza extrema experimentada por pessoas a viverem nos campos: “A população nos campos é uma amostra da sociedade Timorense. Como na população em geral, os níveis do desemprego são extremamente altos.... Cada deslocado com trabalho tem a probabilidade de estar a suportar um número substancial de familiares. Para os que estão no desemprego, pouca actividade estruturada é disponível para além da participação em actividades criminosas e gangues de artes marciais.”

Muitos deslocados estão ainda demasiado aterrorizados para voltarem para as suas casas depois da violência de 2006, enquanto outros tiveram as suas casas destruídas. Para muita gente, contudo, a ameaça de fome permanece a principal razão porque ficam nos campos. Timor-Leste continua uma das nações mais empobrecidas no mundo, com alto desemprego e pelo menos 40 por cento da população a viver por debaixo da linha oficial de pobreza de 55 cêntimos USA por dia.

Até ao mês passado, os deslocados e as suas famílias nos campos pelo menos recebiam uma ração básica de alimentos, mesmo apesar de mulheres e crianças terem de esperar em linha cada mês até seis horas para receber o lote de quatro quilogramas de arroz e meio litro de óleo alimentar.
A AFP entrevistou vários deslocados num campo improvisado num convento convertido em Dili onde 7,000 pessoas estão agora concentradas. Gregório Sousa e o filho têm estado a viver numa tenda há quase dois anos. “Eu quero realmente ir para casa logo que possível, mas não sei para onde posso ir depois de sair daqui,” disse Gregório. “É por isso que vivo aqui. Se o governo nos der a escolha e nos ajudar financeiramente, regressarei à minha aldeia.”

Filomena Soares que vivia no campo com a família desde que a sua casa no oeste do país foi destruída pelo fogo durante o desassossego. “Não temos casa para onde regressar,” disse ela à agência de notícias. “Mesmo se quisermos partir, para onde é que iremos? Não podemos simplesmente viver debaixo das estrelas. Estamos prontos a voltar se o Estado nos der assistência financeira para repararmos a nossa casa e ficar habitável outra vez. Agora a segurança não é um problema para nós, as pessoas de lá querem-nos de regresso.”

O WFP tem negado alegações que a sua decisão de cortar a ajuda alimentar aos deslocados tem o objectivo de dispersar os deslocados e de fechar os campos. Funcionários da ONU disseram à Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN) que uma pesquisa que tinham dirigido revelou que “apenas metade dos 70,000 deslocados registados nos campos e famílias hospedeiras sofriam actualmente de insegurança alimentar.” O WFP insistiu que eram também obrigados a assistir aquelas pessoas que precisavam de ajuda alimentar mas não eram deslocados. A agência, contudo, não explicou porque é que não ajudava todos com necessidades em Timor-Leste.
Não é claro a extensão em que a WFP foi influenciada pela escalada mundial dos preços dos alimentos, incluindo do arroz. Desde o início de 2006, em grande parte como resultado da especulação financeira nos mercados financeiros mundiais, a média dos preços dos alimentos subiu 217 por cento. Esta inflação afectou o trabalho do WFP no Sudeste Asiático. No Cambodja, por exemplo, o alto preço do arroz levou à suspensão dum programa que dava o pequeno almoço gratuito a 450,000 alunos pobres. A inflação dos preços dos alimentos no mundo tem afectado gravemente os Timorenses comuns. O país importa cerca de 60 por cento das suas necessidades de arroz, e os preços entraram em espiral nos últimos meses. Um relatório disse que uma saca de 35 quilogramas de arroz vendida por $US13 em Fevereiro custa agora $US20, e nalgumas áreas remotas $US27.A inflação em espiral aumentará mais as dificuldades enfrentadas pelos deslocados que estão a ser forçados a sair dos campos.

O governo Timorense do Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão falhou em alocar quaisquer fundos para ajuda alimentar humanitária. O Secretário de Estado para a Assistência Social Jacinto de Deus afirmou: “Isso é algo que o governo devia tomar sobre si, mas infelizmente não antecipamos isto durante as discussão do orçamento para 2008.” Isto não tem qualquer credibilidade. A decisão do WFP para cortar a ajuda alimentar era esperada, e o governo de Gusmão tinha anteriormente apoiado a decisão da agência da ONU de cortar as rações para metade. A realidade é que o governo não fez qualquer tentativa de substituir o decréscimo da ajuda alimentar porque quer fechar os campos de deslocados.

Do mesmo modo, nenhum dador internacional de ajuda, incluindo a Austrália, se ofereceu para providenciar os fundos necessários para dar arroz aos centros de deslocados. O governo Australiano e instituições de política estrangeira à muito tempo que discutem abertamente a necessidade de dispersar os campos, que são encarados como uma fonte potencialmente explosiva de instabilidade social e política no país. O documento recente do International Crisis Group sobre a crise segue-se a numerosos outros relatórios que têm avisado da insustentabilidade de deixar 10 por cento da população de Timor-Leste como deslocados sem casa.

Tentativas anteriores de encerrar centros de deslocados envolveram persuasão — incluindo uma oferta para subsídios para reconstrução de casas de deslocados destruídas em 2006 — e força e repressão directa. Em Fevereiro de 2007, tropas Australianas mataram a tiro dois deslocados que estavam a evitar que o seu campo perto do aeroporto de Dili fosse intimidade por forças de segurança do governo e internacionais. Com o falhanço de tais métodos para mudar os deslocados, eles vão ser efectivamente mortos pela fome. O ministro dos estrangeiros do Labor Stephen Smith anunciou em 1 de Maio um pacote adicional de ajuda de $30 milhões para o WFP, dos quais apenas $1 milhão foi alocado para Timor-Leste. Esta soma é um pingo no oceano comparado com as necessidades de alimentos da população Timorense e certamente não substitui a cessação do programa da ração de arroz do WFP nos campos de deslocados.

Tudo isto apenas mostra mais a fraude da afirmação do governo Australiano que as suas operações em Timor-Leste têm na base uma preocupação humanitária pela população. Canberra gastou recursos significativos nas intervenções lideradas pelos militares em 1999 e 2006 de modo a afastar poderes rivais e garantir o seu controlo em curso das reservas lucrativas de petróleo e gás do Mar de Timor. O bem-estar da população de Timor-Leste “independente” nunca foi um factor nas operações de sucessivos governos dos Liberal e do Labor.

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Timor-Leste: cortadas as rações de arroz para os deslocados
WSWS, 15 Maio

Dezenas de milhares de deslocados Timorenses estão ameaçados de morrer à fome depois das agências de socorro internacional terem cessado a entrega de ajuda alimentar em todos os campos na capital da nação, Dili. No mês passado o Programa Mundial de Alimentação (WFP), uma agência da ONU, cortou as suas rações regulares de arroz nos centros de deslocados. Em Fevereiro a organização tinha reduzido a ração mensal por pessoa de oito para quatro quilogramas.

Os campos de deslocados foram montados depois de mais de 150,000 pessoas terem fugido das suas casas quando irrompeu a violência em 2006. Dois anos mais tarde, 100,000 pessoas — um décimo da população — continua classificada como deslocada. Cerca de 30,000 deslocados vivem em campos no exterior de Dili, com os restantes 70,000 forçados a refugiarem-se com amigos e família.

As condições nos campos são horrorosas. Um relatório emitido pelo International Crisis Group (ICG) baseado na Europa em 31 de Março, intitulado “Crise de Deslocação em Timor-Leste”, revelou alguns aspectos da situação.

O ICG afirmava: “A ONU reporta que os deslocamentos foram acompanhados com a aumentada incidência de doenças respiratórias, malária, diarreia e má-nutrição — apesar da última ser aliviada nos campos pelo programa de distribuição de alimentos. Durante as chuvadas, alguns campos inundam, enquanto noutros os blocos sanitários pingam ou extravasam.... Não foi tomada qualquer acção em campos identificados em estudos de Maio e Julho de 2007 de alta prioridade para serem fechados com base nas deficientes condições sanitárias. Os campos têm um ambiente particularmente problemático para mulheres e crianças. As tendas e blocos sanitários sobrepovoados providenciam pouca privacidade. As crianças estão expostas a riscos relacionados com alojamento e condições de vida inadequados. Crianças, mulheres, idosos e outros grupos vulneráveis correm um risco maior de exploração de abusos de vários tipos — foram relatados casos de prostituição e de tráfico humano forçado.”

O relatório prosseguia a sublinhar a pobreza extrema experimentada por pessoas a viverem nos campos: “A população nos campos é uma amostra da sociedade Timorense. Como na população em geral, os níveis do desemprego são extremamente altos.... Cada deslocado com trabalho tem a probabilidade de estar a suportar um número substancial de familiares. Para os que estão no desemprego, pouca actividade estruturada é disponível para além da participação em actividades criminosas e gangues de artes marciais.”

Muitos deslocados estão ainda demasiado aterrorizados para voltarem para as suas casas depois da violência de 2006, enquanto outros tiveram as suas casas destruídas. Para muita gente, contudo, a ameaça de fome permanece a principal razão porque ficam nos campos. Timor-Leste continua uma das nações mais empobrecidas no mundo, com alto desemprego e pelo menos 40 por cento da população a viver por debaixo da linha oficial de pobreza de 55 cêntimos USA por dia.

Até ao mês passado, os deslocados e as suas famílias nos campos pelo menos recebiam uma ração básica de alimentos, mesmo apesar de mulheres e crianças terem de esperar em linha cada mês até seis horas para receber o lote de quatro quilogramas de arroz e meio litro de óleo alimentar.

A AFP entrevistou vários deslocados num campo improvisado num convento convertido em Dili onde 7,000 pessoas estão agora concentradas. Gregório Sousa e o filho têm estado a viver numa tenda há quase dois anos. “Eu quero realmente ir para casa logo que possível, mas não sei para onde posso ir depois de sair daqui,” disse Gregório. “É por isso que vivo aqui. Se o governo nos der a escolha e nos ajudar financeiramente, regressarei à minha aldeia.”

Filomena Soares que vivia no campo com a família desde que a sua casa no oeste do país foi destruída pelo fogo durante o desassossego. “Não temos casa para onde regressar,” disse ela à agência de notícias. “Mesmo se quisermos partir, para onde é que iremos? Não podemos simplesmente viver debaixo das estrelas. Estamos prontos a voltar se o Estado nos der assistência financeira para repararmos a nossa casa e ficar habitável outra vez. Agora a segurança não é um problema para nós, as pessoas de lá querem-nos de regresso.”

O WFP tem negado alegações que a sua decisão de cortar a ajuda alimentar aos deslocados tem o objectivo de dispersar os deslocados e de fechar os campos. Funcionários da ONU disseram à Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN) que uma pesquisa que tinham dirigido revelou que “apenas metade dos 70,000 deslocados registados nos campos e famílias hospedeiras sofriam actualmente de insegurança alimentar.” O WFP insistiu que eram também obrigados a assistir aquelas pessoas que precisavam de ajuda alimentar mas não eram deslocados. A agência, contudo, não explicou porque é que não ajudava todos com necessidades em Timor-Leste.

Não é claro a extensão em que a WFP foi influenciada pela escalada mundial dos preços dos alimentos, incluindo do arroz. Desde o início de 2006, em grande parte como resultado da especulação financeira nos mercados financeiros mundiais, a média dos preços dos alimentos subiu 217 por cento. Esta inflação afectou o trabalho do WFP no Sudeste Asiático. No Cambodja, por exemplo, o alto preço do arroz levou à suspensão dum programa que dava o pequeno almoço gratuito a 450,000 alunos pobres. A inflação dos preços dos alimentos no mundo tem afectado gravemente os Timorenses comuns. O país importa cerca de 60 por cento das suas necessidades de arroz, e os preços entraram em espiral nos últimos meses. Um relatório disse que uma saca de 35 quilogramas de arroz vendida por $US13 em Fevereiro custa agora $US20, e nalgumas áreas remotas $US27.
A inflação em espiral aumentará mais as dificuldades enfrentadas pelos deslocados que estão a ser forçados a sair dos campos.

O governo Timorense do Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão falhou em alocar quaisquer fundos para ajuda alimentar humanitária. O Secretário de Estado para a Assistência Social Jacinto de Deus afirmou: “Isso é algo que o governo devia tomar sobre si, mas infelizmente não antecipamos isto durante as discussão do orçamento para 2008.” Isto não tem qualquer credibilidade. A decisão do WFP para cortar a ajuda alimentar era esperada, e o governo de Gusmão tinha anteriormente apoiado a decisão da agência da ONU de cortar as rações para metade. A realidade é que o governo não fez qualquer tentativa de substituir o decréscimo da ajuda alimentar porque quer fechar os campos de deslocados.

Do mesmo modo, nenhum dador internacional de ajuda, incluindo a Austrália, se ofereceu para providenciar os fundos necessários para dar arroz aos centros de deslocados. O governo Australiano e instituições de política estrangeira à muito tempo que discutem abertamente a necessidade de dispersar os campos, que são encarados como uma fonte potencialmente explosiva de instabilidade social e política no país. O documento recente do International Crisis Group sobre a crise segue-se a numerosos outros relatórios que têm avisado da insustentabilidade de deixar 10 por cento da população de Timor-Leste como deslocados sem casa.

Tentativas anteriores de encerrar centros de deslocados envolveram persuasão — incluindo uma oferta para subsídios para reconstrução de casas de deslocados destruídas em 2006 — e força e repressão directa. Em Fevereiro de 2007, tropas Australianas mataram a tiro dois deslocados que estavam a evitar que o seu campo perto do aeroporto de Dili fosse intimidade por forças de segurança do governo e internacionais. Com o falhanço de tais métodos para mudar os deslocados, eles vão ser efectivamente mortos pela fome. O ministro dos estrangeiros do Labor Stephen Smith anunciou em 1 de Maio um pacote adicional de ajuda de $30 milhões para o WFP, dos quais apenas $1 milhão foi alocado para Timor-Leste. Esta soma é um pingo no oceano comparado com as necessidades de alimentos da população Timorense e certamente não substitui a cessação do programa da ração de arroz do WFP nos campos de deslocados.

Tudo isto apenas mostra mais a fraude da afirmação do governo Australiano que as suas operações em Timor-Leste têm na base uma preocupação humanitária pela população. Canberra gastou recursos significativos nas intervenções lideradas pelos militares em 1999 e 2006 de modo a afastar poderes rivais e garantir o seu controlo em curso das reservas lucrativas de petróleo e gás do Mar de Timor. O bem-estar da população de Timor-Leste “independente” nunca foi um factor nas operações de sucessivos governos dos Liberal e do Labor.

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.