sexta-feira, maio 02, 2008

East Timor: Plot thickens as leader of alleged “coup” attempt surrenders

WSWS : News & Analysis : Asia : East Timor

By Patrick O’Connor2 May 2008

Gastao Salsinha, the alleged co-leader of what was labelled an assassination or coup attempt against President Xanana Gusmao and Prime Minister Jose Ramos-Horta on February 11, surrendered to authorities in Dili on Tuesday. Salsinha is specifically accused of attacking Gusmao’s vehicle after former major Alfredo Reinado was shot dead by soldiers at Ramos-Horta’s residence. The former army lieutenant denies these allegations and insists that neither he nor Reinado tried to orchestrate a coup or assassination.

Salsinha’s surrender comes amid additional revelations that cast further doubt over official explanations for the murky events of February 11, and again point to the possibility that Reinado himself was set up for assassination.

Salsinha had been on the run with about a dozen of his men in Timor’s western districts since the alleged attack on Gusmao. He previously led the 600 soldiers known as the “petitioners”. Their 2006 mutiny precipitated widespread violence that resulted in 150,000 Timorese fleeing their homes. The unrest was followed by an Australian military intervention and the ousting of the Fretilin government led by Mari Alkatiri.

Salsinha formally agreed to surrender last Friday and spent the next few days in negotiations with authorities in the western town of Gleno. He surrendered in Dili on Tuesday along with 12 fellow ex-soldiers, including Marcel Caetano, who is alleged to have shot Ramos-Horta. Ramos-Horta publicly met the rebel soldiers in Dili as they formally handed over their weapons and submitted to Timorese police in a ceremony held at the Government Palace. With Prime Minister Gusmao in Jakarta for talks with the Indonesian government, Deputy Prime Minister Jose Luis Gutteres presided over the surrender and declared it a “historic moment” for East Timor.

Last month Salsinha gave a telephone interview to Australia’s SBS television program, “Dateline”. “There are many accusations about us, about Major Alfredo’s death and the president being wounded and also the attack on the prime minister,” he said. “They all say that we were planning a coup. But they are lying. Whoever says that is trying to sully our reputation.... I was there but had no intention to launch a coup or harm the prime minister. If we’d planned to harm the prime minister, he would not have made it to Dili.”

Salsinha told “Dateline” that early in the morning of February 11, Reinado, whom he claimed was drunk, ordered his men to accompany him to Dili to meet with Ramos-Horta and Gusmao. Salsinha said he waited along a road leading to Gusmao’s house and awaited further instructions while Reinado went to Ramos-Horta’s home.

It remains unclear what happened next. Some reports claim that Salsinha received a text message notifying him that Reinado had been shot dead, and that the petitioners’ leader then unsuccessfully ambushed Gusmao’s motorcade. But government MP Mario Carrascalao has questioned how no one was injured in the alleged ambush, while Mari Alkatiri insists that Fretilin has photographic evidence indicating that the entire incident was faked.

The “Dateline” program, broadcast on April 16, included an interview with one of Reinado’s men, codenamed Teboko, who was involved in the clash at Ramos-Horta’s home. Teboko insists that Reinado had an appointment to see the president.

“We had an order from Alfredo not to attack the residence of the president,” he told the SBS program. “It’s clear. You can imagine that if we were going to attack him we could have shot him in Maubisse or Suai when we met him [previously]. We did not think of this. It was not in our minds. We had an appointment with the president from Major Alfredo and we were going with two vehicles and we arrived without any weapon discharge. As we know on the FDTL [Timorese military] part, they shoot at us first. They killed Major Alfredo and a member Leopoldino.”
“Dateline” journalist Mark Davis explained: “According to Teboko, about 10 minutes after entering the compound with no gun fire and none threatened, Alfredo Reinado was suddenly shot dead. Meeting closed.”

A similar account was provided by Natalia Lidia Guterres, the widow of Leopoldino, Reinado’s man who was also killed in Ramos-Horta’s residence. She told the Australian that her husband had entered their home at 3 a.m. on February 11 to change his uniform. She told the newspaper that Leopoldino had said, “We are going to meet Señor President”. The article, published on April 19, continued: “Natalia said Leopoldino seemed ‘most happy’ because they were going to work things out at a meeting [Angelita] Pires had arranged.”

The Australian also noted that a hand-drawn map of Ramos-Horta’s residence was found on Reinado’s dead body. The layout details were allegedly provided by Albino Asis, one of Ramos-Horta’s military guards who had also worked alongside Reinado in the military police before the 2006 crisis. Telephone records allegedly show Reinado speaking with Asis immediately prior to the alleged attack on Ramos-Horta’s residence. The Australian suggested that Asis had betrayed Ramos-Horta and was collaborating with Reinado. But if this were the case, why did Reinado enter the president’s home looking for him when he was away on his regular morning walk? Asis must have been familiar with Ramos-Horta’s schedule.

Also unexplained is the role of another man who worked at Ramos-Horta’s office and was seen at Reinado’s camp on the night before the February 11 violence. According to “Dateline”, the unidentified individual was a member of a group called MUNJ (Movement for Unity and Justice) which acted as a go-between for Ramos-Horta and Reinado. The SBS program reported: “Since the Horta shooting MUNJ have been particularly coy about their presence in Reinado’s camp the night before the attack. It’s clear that they were delivering a message from Horta, but it is totally unclear what time they left.”

Official account collapses

The official account of what transpired on February 11—that Reinado led a coup or assassination attempt—has fallen apart. It is now virtually certain that the former major went to the president’s residence to speak with Ramos-Horta, and may have believed he had an appointment. Why he did so, and how he came to be killed—up to an hour before Ramos-Horta himself was wounded—remains unclear.

The April 16 “Dateline” broadcast suggested Reinado feared that an amnesty deal, which he had arranged with Ramos-Horta in mid-January, was at risk. Under the terms of this secret agreement, Reinado and his men were to submit to the police, after which Ramos-Horta would issue them a full pardon. But on February 7, Ramos-Horta convened a meeting at his home involving Gusmao, government parliamentarians, and a large Fretilin delegation. The MPs reportedly told Ramos-Horta that he did not have the authority to issue Reinado an amnesty, and that this would have to be discussed in further meetings scheduled for February 12 and 14.

“Dateline” suggested that Reinado, having learned of what had been discussed, had gone to Dili to confront Ramos-Horta, whom he thought was preparing to renege on their deal.

This is certainly a possibility. Notably, however, the SBS program failed to acknowledge that the main item on the agenda of Ramos-Horta’s February 7 meeting was not Reinado’s amnesty but rather the formation of a new government. The president had concluded that Gusmao’s government, which was increasingly unpopular and wracked by infighting, was no longer viable. He told the assembled MPs that he agreed with Fretilin’s demand for early elections to be held to resolve the political crisis. Gusmao adamantly disagreed, however, and insisted that his coalition would continue to rule alone.

The World Socialist Web Site has previously noted that Prime Minister Gusmao had much to gain from Reinado’s death. In accordance with the old investigative standard cui bono (to whose benefit?), the possibility that Gusmao, or forces aligned with Gusmao, may have had something to do with the former major’s elimination cannot be excluded. The events of February 11 certainly resulted in the immediate cancellation of Ramos-Horta’s planned February 12 and 14 meetings, which had threatened to further advance moves to dissolve Gusmao’s government.

The prime minister immediately seized upon the violence to claim authoritarian powers under a declared “state of siege” (which will remain in force in Timor’s western districts until late May).

Moreover, Reinado’s death came after the former major had released a widely circulated DVD in which he accused Gusmao of directly instigating the 2006 petitioner’s protests that triggered the events culminating in the ousting of Alkatiri’s administration. Reinado had threatened to provide more details of Gusmao’s alleged role in the “regime change” operation.

Outstanding questions about Canberra’s role

Reinado had long standing connections with Australia. He resided in the country as a refugee in the 1990s (his wife and children continue to live in Perth), and received military training in Canberra after he had returned to Timor and joined the country’s armed forces. In 2006, Reinado was hailed in the Australian media for his role in destabilising the Alkatiri government, which Canberra considered too closely aligned to China and Portugal. After UN police arrested him on weapons charges, Reinado and his men somehow walked out of a Dili prison being guarded by Australian and New Zealand troops. Australian soldiers, including elite SAS forces, then claimed to be unable to locate and detain the former major as he issued regular public statements and conducted media interviews from his base in Timor’s west. This was completely implausible—Canberra has an extensive network of intelligence agents operating in East Timor, as well as an entire intelligence division, the Defence Signals Directorate, dedicated to monitoring electronic communications.

In the days leading up to Reinado’s killing, the former major made and received 47 telephone calls to Australia. It remains unknown to whom he was speaking. Timorese authorities have expressed frustration over the difficulty they have experienced in getting information from Australian intelligence officials about the voice recordings and text messages they intercepted. Indonesian authorities, on the other hand, immediately provided their intelligence relating to several calls Reinado made to that country.

Timorese investigators are also waiting for information regarding a Darwin bank account, containing up to $US1 million, that Reinado was able to access. According to East Timor prosecutor-general Longinhos Monteiro, Reinado was informed that the money had been deposited in the account in a text message sent by Angelita Pires, his lover and former go-between with the Australian military. Timorese prosecutors, President Ramos-Horta, Salsinha, and many of Reinado’s men have all accused Pires of manipulating Reinado and provoking the violence on February 11. No criminal charges have yet been laid against her.

Ramos-Horta has publicly demanded that Canberra explain why the million dollar sum went undetected, particularly in light of the automatic reporting alerts that routinely apply to large deposits under Australia’s strict banking laws. He also condemned the Australian government’s lack of action. “Two months [later] and I haven’t seen action to force the bank in Australia to release information,” he told ABC radio. “I want this resolved very, very quickly, otherwise I will take the matter to the UN security council.”

This extraordinary ultimatum was met with assurances from foreign minister Stephen Smith that the relevant information would be shared once “appropriate procedures” were followed by Timorese officials.

The Rudd Labor government’s apparent stonewalling has fuelled rumours in Dili that Australian personnel had a hand in the events of February 11. An April 22 article in the Australian noted: “It must disturb Australia—which heads the unloved International Stabilisation Force, which has been taken to sharpen its image by running newspaper advertisements showing a Digger shaking hands with a Timorese kid—that Timorese will interpret the [Darwin-deposited] money claims as powerful proof non-Timorese Australians were backing Reinado and Ms Pires.”
The piece continued: “Things are now skewing sideways, with many Timorese convinced that the February 11 attacks were all about Timor Gap oil and gas, with Australia not content to take the lion’s share it already has and, therefore, somehow trying to execute the Timor leadership in order to grab more money off the struggling country. Ordinary people will advise you quietly, with wide eyes, that this is really a battle between Australia and Indonesia v China.”

These rumours point to the escalating hostility towards the ongoing Australian occupation of East Timor. How credible they are is another matter. One more plausible explanation than Canberra being involved in “trying to execute the Timor leadership” is that Australian officials knew of, and perhaps participated in, a plan to eliminate Reinado. The former major had served his purpose as far as the Australian government was concerned, and was now threatening to help bring down the Canberra-aligned Gusmao government, thereby opening the door for Fretilin to return to power. Having expended significant resources ousting Alkatiri in 2006, this was the last thing Australian strategists wanted.

Salsinha’s surrender has been hailed in the international media as a major step towards peace and stability in East Timor, but the potentially explosive political crisis remains unresolved.
While still recuperating in Australia, President Ramos-Horta said he still feared for his life and was considering stepping down in order to write his memoirs in Paris. Now in Dili, however, he insists he has no intention of resigning. He has repeated his support for early elections to be held at the start of next year, and has also called on Fretilin to form a shadow cabinet, “to contribute to the country’s development”. The move has been interpreted in Dili as an expression of support for a potential Fretilin-led administration. In a speech to the Timorese parliament on April 23, Ramos-Horta said he would pardon Rogerio Lobato, a senior Fretilin MP who was convicted of arming civilians during the 2006 crisis. Lobato’s case formed an important part of bogus allegations issued by the ABC “Four Corners” program that Alkatiri had armed a “hit squad” to assassinate Fretilin’s opponents. The ABC smear job was used by Gusmao and the Australian government to pressure Alkatiri into resigning.

Ramos-Horta’s pledge to provide Lobato with an amnesty has been denounced in the Australian media. His apparent shift away from Gusmao and towards Fretilin will be similarly unwelcome. In all likelihood, Canberra’s response will be to step up its back door manoeuvres and dirty tricks aimed at bedding down its significant economic and strategic interests in the tiny, impoverished country.

Tradução:

Timor-Leste: Conspiração acentua-se quando se rende o líder duma alegada tentativa de “golpe”

WSWS : News & Analysis : Asia : East Timor
Por Patrick O’Connor 2 Maio 2008

Gastão Salsinha, o alegado co-líder do que foi rotulado tentativa de assassínio contra o Presidente Xanana Gusmão e o Primeiro-Ministro José Ramos-Horta em 11 de Fevereiro, rendeu-se às autoridades em Dili na Terça-feira. Salsinha é acusado especificamente de atacar o veículo de Gusmão depois do antigo major Alfredo Reinado ter sido morto a tiro por soldados na residência de Ramos-Horta. O antigo tenente das forças armadas nega essas alegações e insiste que nem ele nem Reinado tentaram orquestrar um golpe ou assassínio.

A rendição de Salsinha veio no medo de mais revelações que deitam mais dúvidas sobre a explicação oficial pra os eventos lamacentos de 11 de Fevereiro, e apontam mais uma vez paraa possibilidade de o próprio Reinado ter caído numa cilada de assassínio.

Salsinha tinha andado em fuga com cerca de doze dos seus homens nos distritos do oeste de Timor desde os alegados ataques contra Gusmão. Ele lidetou anteriormente os 600 soldados conhecidos como “peticionários”. O seu motim em 2006 precipitou ampla violência do que resultou a fuga de 150,000 Timorenses das suas casas. O desassossego foi seguido por uma intervenção militar Australiana e o derrube do governo da Fretilin liderado por Mari Alkatiri.
Salsinha concordou formalmente em render-se na passada Sexta-feira e passou os dias seguintes em negociações na cidade do oeste de Gleno. Ele rendeu-se em Dili na Terça-feira juntamente com 12 camaradas ex-soldados, incluindo Marcelo Caetano, que é alegado ter baleado Ramos-Horta. Ramos-Horta encontrou-se publicamente com os soldados amotinados em Dili quando entregaram formalmente as armas e se submeteram à polícia Timorense numa cerimónia realizada no Palácio do Governo. Com o Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão em Jacarta para conversações com o governo Indonésio, o Vice-Primeiro-Ministro José Luis Guterres presidiu à rendição e declaou isso um “momento histórico” para Timor-Leste.

No mês passado Salsinha deu uma entrevista telefónica ao programa “Dateline”da televisão da Austrália, SBS . “Há muitas acusações acerca de nós, acerca da morte do Major Alfredo e do presidente ser ferido e também sobre o ataque ao primeiro-ministro,” disse ele. “Dizem todos que estávamos a planear um golpe. Mas estão a mentir. Seja o que for que digam estão a tentar sujar a nossa reputação.... Estive lá mas não tinha nenhuma intenção para fazer um golpe ou prejudicar o primeiro-ministro. Se tivéssemos planeado magoar o primeiro-ministro, ele não teria chegado a Dili.”

Salsinha disse ao “Dateline” que cedo na manhã de 11 de Fevereiro, Reinado, que ele afirma estar bêbado, ordenou aos seus homens para o acompanharem a Dili para se encontrar com Ramos-Horta e Gusmão. Salsinha disse que esperou numa estrada que vai para a casa de Gusmão e que esperou por mais instruções enquanto Reinado foi a casa de Ramos-Horta.

Isso mantém obscuro o que aconteceu a seguir. Alguns relatos dizem que Salsinha recebeu uma mensagem de texto a informá-lo que Reinado tinha sido morto a tiro e que então o líder dos peticionários tentou sem sucesso emboscar a caravana de Gusmão. Mas o deputado do governo Mário Carrascalão questionou como é que ninguém foi ferido na alegada emboscada, enquanto Mari Alkatiri insiste que a Fretilin tem evidência fotográfica que indica que todo o incidente foi falsificado.

O programa “Dateline”, emitido em 16 de Abril, incluía uma entrevista com um dos homens de Reinado, de nome de código Teboko, que esteve envolvido no confronto em casa de Ramos-Horta. Teboko insiste que Reinado tinha uma marcação para ver o presidente.

“Tínhamos uma ordem de Alfredo para não atacar a residência do presidente,” disse ele ao programa do SBS. “É claro. Pode entender que se íamos para o atacar podíamos tê-lo baleado em Maubisse ou Suai quando o encontrámos [previamente]. Não pensámos isso. Isso não estava nas nossas mentes. Tínhamos uma marcação com o presidente do Major Alfredo e íamos com dois veículos e chegámos sem nenhuma descarga de arma. Como sabemos da parte das F-DTL [militares Timorenses], eles dispararam contra nós primeiro. Eles mataram o Major Alfredo e o membro Leopoldino.”O jornalista do “Dateline” Mark Davis explicou: “de acordo com Teboko, cerca de 10 minutos depois de entrarem no complexo sem nenhum fogo de arma e nenhuma ameaça, Alfredo Reinado foi de repente morto a tiro. Encontro encerrado.”

Um relato similar foi feito por Natália Lidia Guterres, a viúva de Leopoldino, o homem de Reinado que também foi morto na residência de Ramos-Horta. Ela disse ao The Australian que o marido entrou em casa às 3 a.m. Em 11 de Fevereiro para mudar o uniforme. Contou ao jornal que Leopoldino tinha dito “Vamos ter um encontro com o Senhor Presidente”. O artigo, publicado em 19 de Abril, continuava: “Natália disse que Leopoldino parecia ‘muito feliz’ porque iam resolver coisas num encontro que a [Angelita] Pires tinha arranjado.”

The Australian sublinhou também que um mapa feito à mão da residência de Ramos-Horta foi encontrado no corpo de Reinado. Os detalhes foram alegadamente dados por Albino Assis, um dos guardas militares de Ramos-Horta que tinha também trabalhado ao lado de Reinado na polícia militar antes da crise de 2006. Dados telefónicos mostram alegadamente Reinado a falar com Assis imediatamente antes do alegado ataque na residência de Ramos-Horta. The Australian sugeriu que Assis tinha traído Ramos-Horta e que estava a colaborar com Reinado. Mas se fosse esse o caso, porque é que Reinado entrou na casa do presidente à procura dele quando ele estava fora no seu regular passeio matinal? Assis devia estar familiarizado com a agenda de Ramos-Horta.

Também não explicado é o papel dum outro homem que trabalhou no gabinete de Ramos-Horta e que foi visto no acampamento de Reinado na noite antes da violência de 11 de Fevereiro. De acordo com o “Dateline”, o indivíduo não identificado era membro dum grupo chamado MUNJ (Movimento para a Unidade e Justiça) que actuou como intermediário para Ramos-Horta e Reinado. O programa SBS reparou: “Desde os tiros contra Horta o MUNJ tem estado particularmente calado sobre a sua presença no acampamento de Reinado na noite antes do ataque. Está claro que eles estavam a transmitir uma mensagem de Horta, mas não se sabe nada sobre as horas a que partiram.”

Relato Oficial Desmorona-se

O relato oficial do que transpirou em 11 de Fevereiro — que Reinado liderou um golpe ou uma tentativa de assassínio — caiu aos pedaços. É agora virtualmente certo que o antigo major foi à residência do presidente para falar com Ramos-Horta, e pode ter acreditado que tinha uma marcação. Porque é que o fez, e como é que veio para ser morto— cerca de uma hora antes do próprio Ramos-Horta ter sido ferido — mantém-se obscuro.

A emissão de 16 de Abril da “Dateline” sugeriu que Reinado receava que um acordo de amnistia, que tinha acordado com Ramos-Horta em meados de Janeiro, estava em risco. Sobre os termos deste acordo secreto, Reinado e os seus homens deviam submeter-se à polícia, depois do que Ramos-Horta lhes daria um perdão total. Mas em 7 de Fevereiro, Ramos-Horta convocou um encontro em sua casa envolvendo Gusmão, deputados do governo e uma grande delegação da Fretilin. Segundo relatos os deputados disseram a Ramos-Horta que ele não tinha autoridade para dar uma amnistia a Reinado e que isso teria que ser discutido em mais encontros agendados para 12 e 14 de Fevereiro.

O “Dateline” sugeriu que Reinado, tendo sabido do que tinha sido discutido, tinha ido a Dili para confrontar Ramos-Horta, que ele pensava que se estava a preparar para renegar o acordo.
Isto é certamente uma possibilidade. Extraordinariamente, contudo, o programa da SBS falhou em saber que o item principal na agenda do encontro de 7 de Fevereiro de Ramos-Horta não era a amnistia a Reinado mas sim a formação de um novo governo. O presidente tinha concluído que o governo de Gusmão, que é cada vez mais impopular e dividido por lutas internas, deixara de ser viável. Ele disse aos deputados reunidos que concordava com o pedido da Fretilin da realização de eleições antecipadas para resolver a crise política. Gusmão discordava duramente, contudo e insistia que a coligação continuaria a governar sozinha.

O World Socialist Web Site sublinhou previamente que o Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão tinha muito a ganhar da morte de Reinado. De acordo com a velha fórmula da investigação cui bono (quem ganha?), a possibilidade de Gusmão, ou as forças alinhadas com Gusmão, poderem ter algo a ver com a eliminação do antigo major não pode ser excluída. Os eventos de 11 de Fevereiro resultaram certamente no cancelamento imediato dos encontros planeados de 12 e 14 de Fevereiro de Ramos-Horta, que tinham ameaçado avançar mais movimentos para dissolver o governo de Gusmão.

O primeiro-ministro cavalgou imediatamente a violência para reclamar poderes autoritários sob a declaração dum “Estado de sítio” (que se manterá em força nos distritos do oeste de Timor até ao fim de Maio).
Mais ainda, a morte de Reinado ocorreu depois do antigo major ter emitido um DVD que circulou amplamente onde acusou Gusmão de instigar directamente os protestos dos peticionários em 2006 que desencadearam os eventos culminando no derrube da administração de Alkatiri. Reinado tinha ameaçado dar mais detalhes do alegado papel de Gusmão na operação de “mudança de regime”.

Questões importantes acerca do papel de Canberra

Reinado tinha relações há muito tempo com a Austrália. Ele residiu no país como refugiado nos anos de 1990s (a mulher e filhos continuam a viver em Perth), e recebeu formação militar em Canberra depois de ter regressado a Timor e ter-se juntado às forças armadas do país. Em 2006, Reinado foi elogiado nos media Australianos pelo seu papel na desestabilização do governo de Alkatiri, que Canberra considerava demasiado alinhado com a China e Portugal. Depois da polícia da ONU o ter preso com acusações de armas, Reinado e os seus homens de certo modo saíram duma prisão de Dili que estava a ser guardada por tropas Australianas e da Nova Zelândia.

Soldados Australianos, incluindo forças de elite SAS, então clamaram serem incapazes de localizar e deter o antigo major enquanto ele emitia declarações públicas regulares e dava entrevistas aos media desde a sua base no oeste de Timor. Isto era completamente implausível — Canberra tem uma extensa rede de agentes dos serviços de informações a operarem em Timor-Leste, bem como uma inteira divisão dos serviços de informações, a Directoria de Sinais de Defesa, dedicada a monitorizar comunicações electrónicas.

Nos dias antes da morte de Reinado, o antigo major fez e recebeu 47 chamadas telefónicas para a Austrália. Continua-se a não se saber com quem ele falava. Autoridades Timorenses expressaram frustração sobre a dificuldade que têm experimentado a obter informação das autoridades dos serviços de informações Australianas acerca das gravações de voz e do texto das mensagens que interceptaram. Autoridades Indonésias, por outro lado, forneceram imediatamente as suas informações em relação com várias chamadas que Reinado fez para o país.

Investigadores Timorenses estão também à espera por informações relativas a uma conta dum banco de Darwin, contendo um $US1 milhão, q que Reinado tinha acesso. De acordo com o procurador-geral de Timor-Leste Longinhos Monteiro, Reinado foi informado que o dinheiro tinha sido depositado na conta numa mensagem de texto enviada por Angelita Pires, a sua amante e antiga intermediária com os militares Australianos, Presidente Ramos-Horta, Salsinha, e muitos dos homens de Reinado têm todos acusados Pires de manipular Reinado e de provocar a violência em 11 de Fevereiro. Não foram ainda feitas acusações criminosas contra ela.

Ramos-Horta tem pedido publicamente que Canberra explique como a soma do milhão de dólares passou sem detecção, particularmente à luz dos alertas automáticos que se aplicam por rotina a grandes depósito sob as rigorosas leis bancárias da Austrália. Ele também condenou a falta de acção do governo Australiano. “Dois meses [depois] e não vi nenhuma acção para forçar o banco na Austrália para libertar a informação,” disse ele na ABC radio. “Quero isto resolvido muito, muito rapidamente, de ouro modo levarei a questão ao conselho de segurança da ONU.”
Este ultimato extraordinário teve resposta com a garantia do ministro dos estrangeiros Stephen Smith que a informação relevante será partilhada logo que “procedimentos apropriados” sejam seguidos pelas autoridades Timorenses.

O aparente jogar à defesa do governo Labor de Rudd alimentou rumores em Dili que pessoal Australiano teve uma mão nos eventos de 11 de Fevereiro. Um artigo de 22 de Abril no The Australian sublinhava: “Isso deve perturbar a Austrália — que lidera a não amada Força Internacional de Estabilização, que foi levada a afiar a sua imagem fazendo anúncios nos jornais que mostram um soldado Australiano a apertar a mão a um garoto Timorense — que os Timorenses interpretarão afirmações do dinheiro [depositado em Darwin] como prova poderosa de que Australianos não-Timorenses estiveram a suportar Reinado e a Srª Pires.”A peça continuava: “As coisas estão agora a descarrilar, com muitos Timorenses convencidos que os ataques de 11 de Fevereiro tiveram tudo a ver com o petróleo e gás do Timor Gap, com a Austrália não contente em ficar com a parte de leão que já tem e por isso, de certo modo a tentar executar a liderança de Timor de modo a deitar a mão a mais dinheiro do país em luta. Gente comum avisá-lo-à muito calmamente, com os olhos abertos, que isto é realmente uma batalha entre a Austrália e Indonésia vs China.”

Estes rumores apontam para a escalada de hostilidade contra a ocupação Australiana de Timor-Leste em curso. Quanto credíveis são é outra questão. Uma explicação mais credível do que Canberra estar envolvida em “tentar executar a liderança de Timor” é que as autoridades Australianas sabiam e talvez participaram num plano para eliminar Reinado. O antigo major tinha servido os seus propósitos em relação ao que interessava ao governo Australiano, e agora estava a ameaçar a derrubar o governo de Gusmão alinhado com Canberra, e por isso a abrir a porta para a Fretilin regressar ao poder. Tendo gasto recursos significativos a derrubar Alkatiri em 2006, isto era a última coisa que os estrategas Australianos queriam.

A rendição de Salsinha tem sido elogiada nos media internacionais como um passo grande para a paz e estabilidade em Timor-Leste, mas a potencialmente explosiva crise política mantém-se por resolver.Enquanto estava em recuperação na Austrália, o Presidente Ramos-Horta disse que ainda receava pela sua vida e que estava a considerar sair de modo a escrever as memórias em Paris. Agora em Dili, contudo, insiste que não tem nenhuma intenção de resignar. Tem repetido o seu apoio a eleições antecipadas a realizar no início do próximo ano, e pediu também à Fretilin para formar um gabinete sombra, “para contribuir para o desenvolvimento do país”. O gesto tem sido interpretado em Dili como uma expressão de apoio para uma potencial administração liderada pela Fretilin. Num discurso ao parlamento Timorense em 23 de Abril, Ramos-Horta disse que vai perdoar a Rogério Lobato, um deputado de topo da Fretilin Mque foi condenado por armar civis durante a crise de 2006. O caso de Lobato foi uma parte importante de alegações falsas emitidas pelo programa “Four Corners” da ABC que Alkatiri tinha armado um “esquadrão de ataque” para assassinar opositores da Fretilin. O trabalho de difamação da ABC foi usado por Gusmão e pelo governo Australiano para pressionar Alkatiri a resignar.

A promessa de Ramos-Horta para dar uma amnistia a Lobato tem sido denunciada pelos media Australianos. O seu aparente afastamento de Gusmão e aproximação à Fretilin será mal recebido da mesma maneira. Com toda a probabilidade a resposta de Canberra será aumentar as suas manobras por baixo da mesa e jogadas porcas que visam cobrir os seus significativos interesses económicos e estratégicos no país pequeno e empobrecido.

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Timor-Leste: Conspiração acentua-se quando se rende o líder duma alegada tentativa de “golpe”
WSWS : News & Analysis : Asia : East Timor

Por Patrick O’Connor 2 Maio 2008

Gastão Salsinha, o alegado co-líder do que foi rotulado tentativa de assassínio contra o Presidente Xanana Gusmão e o Primeiro-Ministro José Ramos-Horta em 11 de Fevereiro, rendeu-se às autoridades em Dili na Terça-feira. Salsinha é acusado especificamente de atacar o veículo de Gusmão depois do antigo major Alfredo Reinado ter sido morto a tiro por soldados na residência de Ramos-Horta. O antigo tenente das forças armadas nega essas alegações e insiste que nem ele nem Reinado tentaram orquestrar um golpe ou assassínio.

A rendição de Salsinha veio no medo de mais revelações que deitam mais dúvidas sobre a explicação oficial pra os eventos lamacentos de 11 de Fevereiro, e apontam mais uma vez para
a possibilidade de o próprio Reinado ter caído numa cilada de assassínio.

Salsinha tinha andado em fuga com cerca de doze dos seus homens nos distritos do oeste de Timor desde os alegados ataques contra Gusmão. Ele lidetou anteriormente os 600 soldados conhecidos como “peticionários”. O seu motim em 2006 precipitou ampla violência do que resultou a fuga de 150,000 Timorenses das suas casas. O desassossego foi seguido por uma intervenção militar Australiana e o derrube do governo da Fretilin liderado por Mari Alkatiri.

Salsinha concordou formalmente em render-se na passada Sexta-feira e passou os dias seguintes em negociações na cidade do oeste de Gleno. Ele rendeu-se em Dili na Terça-feira juntamente com 12 camaradas ex-soldados, incluindo Marcelo Caetano, que é alegado ter baleado Ramos-Horta. Ramos-Horta encontrou-se publicamente com os soldados amotinados em Dili quando entregaram formalmente as armas e se submeteram à polícia Timorense numa cerimónia realizada no Palácio do Governo. Com o Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão em Jacarta para conversações com o governo Indonésio, o Vice-Primeiro-Ministro José Luis Guterres presidiu à rendição e declaou isso um “momento histórico” para Timor-Leste.

No mês passado Salsinha deu uma entrevista telefónica ao programa “Dateline”da televisão da Austrália, SBS . “Há muitas acusações acerca de nós, acerca da morte do Major Alfredo e do presidente ser ferido e também sobre o ataque ao primeiro-ministro,” disse ele. “Dizem todos que estávamos a planear um golpe. Mas estão a mentir. Seja o que for que digam estão a tentar sujar a nossa reputação.... Estive lá mas não tinha nenhuma intenção para fazer um golpe ou prejudicar o primeiro-ministro. Se tivéssemos planeado magoar o primeiro-ministro, ele não teria chegado a Dili.”

Salsinha disse ao “Dateline” que cedo na manhã de 11 de Fevereiro, Reinado, que ele afirma estar bêbado, ordenou aos seus homens para o acompanharem a Dili para se encontrar com Ramos-Horta e Gusmão. Salsinha disse que esperou numa estrada que vai para a casa de Gusmão e que esperou por mais instruções enquanto Reinado foi a casa de Ramos-Horta.

Isso mantém obscuro o que aconteceu a seguir. Alguns relatos dizem que Salsinha recebeu uma mensagem de texto a informá-lo que Reinado tinha sido morto a tiro e que então o líder dos peticionários tentou sem sucesso emboscar a caravana de Gusmão. Mas o deputado do governo Mário Carrascalão questionou como é que ninguém foi ferido na alegada emboscada, enquanto Mari Alkatiri insiste que a Fretilin tem evidência fotográfica que indica que todo o incidente foi falsificado.

O programa “Dateline”, emitido em 16 de Abril, incluía uma entrevista com um dos homens de Reinado, de nome de código Teboko, que esteve envolvido no confronto em casa de Ramos-Horta. Teboko insiste que Reinado tinha uma marcação para ver o presidente.

“Tínhamos uma ordem de Alfredo para não atacar a residência do presidente,” disse ele ao programa do SBS. “É claro. Pode entender que se íamos para o atacar podíamos tê-lo baleado em Maubisse ou Suai quando o encontrámos [previamente]. Não pensámos isso. Isso não estava nas nossas mentes. Tínhamos uma marcação com o presidente do Major Alfredo e íamos com dois veículos e chegámos sem nenhuma descarga de arma. Como sabemos da parte das F-DTL [militares Timorenses], eles dispararam contra nós primeiro. Eles mataram o Major Alfredo e o membro Leopoldino.”
O jornalista do “Dateline” Mark Davis explicou: “de acordo com Teboko, cerca de 10 minutos depois de entrarem no complexo sem nenhum fogo de arma e nenhuma ameaça, Alfredo Reinado foi de repente morto a tiro. Encontro encerrado.”

Um relato similar foi feito por Natália Lidia Guterres, a viúva de Leopoldino, o homem de Reinado que também foi morto na residência de Ramos-Horta. Ela disse ao The Australian que o marido entrou em casa às 3 a.m. Em 11 de Fevereiro para mudar o uniforme. Contou ao jornal que Leopoldino tinha dito “Vamos ter um encontro com o Senhor Presidente”. O artigo, publicado em 19 de Abril, continuava: “Natália disse que Leopoldino parecia ‘muito feliz’ porque iam resolver coisas num encontro que a [Angelita] Pires tinha arranjado.”

The Australian sublinhou também que um mapa feito à mão da residência de Ramos-Horta foi encontrado no corpo de Reinado. Os detalhes foram alegadamente dados por Albino Assis, um dos guardas militares de Ramos-Horta que tinha também trabalhado ao lado de Reinado na polícia militar antes da crise de 2006. Dados telefónicos mostram alegadamente Reinado a falar com Assis imediatamente antes do alegado ataque na residência de Ramos-Horta. The Australian sugeriu que Assis tinha traído Ramos-Horta e que estava a colaborar com Reinado. Mas se fosse esse o caso, porque é que Reinado entrou na casa do presidente à procura dele quando ele estava fora no seu regular passeio matinal? Assis devia estar familiarizado com a agenda de Ramos-Horta.

Também não explicado é o papel dum outro homem que trabalhou no gabinete de Ramos-Horta e que foi visto no acampamento de Reinado na noite antes da violência de 11 de Fevereiro. De acordo com o “Dateline”, o indivíduo não identificado era membro dum grupo chamado MUNJ (Movimento para a Unidade e Justiça) que actuou como intermediário para Ramos-Horta e Reinado. O programa SBS reparou: “Desde os tiros contra Horta o MUNJ tem estado particularmente calado sobre a sua presença no acampamento de Reinado na noite antes do ataque. Está claro que eles estavam a transmitir uma mensagem de Horta, mas não se sabe nada sobre as horas a que partiram.”

Relato Oficial Desmorona-se

O relato oficial do que transpirou em 11 de Fevereiro — que Reinado liderou um golpe ou uma tentativa de assassínio — caiu aos pedaços. É agora virtualmente certo que o antigo major foi à residência do presidente para falar com Ramos-Horta, e pode ter acreditado que tinha uma marcação. Porque é que o fez, e como é que veio para ser morto— cerca de uma hora antes do próprio Ramos-Horta ter sido ferido — mantém-se obscuro.

A emissão de 16 de Abril da “Dateline” sugeriu que Reinado receava que um acordo de amnistia, que tinha acordado com Ramos-Horta em meados de Janeiro, estava em risco. Sobre os termos deste acordo secreto, Reinado e os seus homens deviam submeter-se à polícia, depois do que Ramos-Horta lhes daria um perdão total. Mas em 7 de Fevereiro, Ramos-Horta convocou um encontro em sua casa envolvendo Gusmão, deputados do governo e uma grande delegação da Fretilin. Segundo relatos os deputados disseram a Ramos-Horta que ele não tinha autoridade para dar uma amnistia a Reinado e que isso teria que ser discutido em mais encontros agendados para 12 e 14 de Fevereiro.

O “Dateline” sugeriu que Reinado, tendo sabido do que tinha sido discutido, tinha ido a Dili para confrontar Ramos-Horta, que ele pensava que se estava a preparar para renegar o acordo.

Isto é certamente uma possibilidade. Extraordinariamente, contudo, o programa da SBS falhou em saber que o item principal na agenda do encontro de 7 de Fevereiro de Ramos-Horta não era a amnistia a Reinado mas sim a formação de um novo governo. O presidente tinha concluído que o governo de Gusmão, que é cada vez mais impopular e dividido por lutas internas, deixara de ser viável. Ele disse aos deputados reunidos que concordava com o pedido da Fretilin da realização de eleições antecipadas para resolver a crise política. Gusmão discordava duramente, contudo e insistia que a coligação continuaria a governar sozinha.

O World Socialist Web Site sublinhou previamente que o Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão tinha muito a ganhar da morte de Reinado. De acordo com a velha fórmula da investigação cui bono (quem ganha?), a possibilidade de Gusmão, ou as forças alinhadas com Gusmão, poderem ter algo a ver com a eliminação do antigo major não pode ser excluída. Os eventos de 11 de Fevereiro resultaram certamente no cancelamento imediato dos encontros planeados de 12 e 14 de Fevereiro de Ramos-Horta, que tinham ameaçado avançar mais movimentos para dissolver o governo de Gusmão.

O primeiro-ministro cavalgou imediatamente a violência para reclamar poderes autoritários sob a declaração dum “Estado de sítio” (que se manterá em força nos distritos do oeste de Timor até ao fim de Maio).

Mais ainda, a morte de Reinado ocorreu depois do antigo major ter emitido um DVD que circulou amplamente onde acusou Gusmão de instigar directamente os protestos dos peticionários em 2006 que desencadearam os eventos culminando no derrube da administração de Alkatiri. Reinado tinha ameaçado dar mais detalhes do alegado papel de Gusmão na operação de “mudança de regime”.

Questões importantes acerca do papel de Canberra

Reinado tinha relações há muito tempo com a Austrália. Ele residiu no país como refugiado nos anos de 1990s (a mulher e filhos continuam a viver em Perth), e recebeu formação militar em Canberra depois de ter regressado a Timor e ter-se juntado às forças armadas do país. Em 2006, Reinado foi elogiado nos media Australianos pelo seu papel na desestabilização do governo de Alkatiri, que Canberra considerava demasiado alinhado com a China e Portugal. Depois da polícia da ONU o ter preso com acusações de armas, Reinado e os seus homens de certo modo saíram duma prisão de Dili que estava a ser guardada por tropas Australianas e da Nova Zelândia. Soldados Australianos, incluindo forças de elite SAS, então clamaram serem incapazes de localizar e deter o antigo major enquanto ele emitia declarações públicas regulares e dava entrevistas aos media desde a sua base no oeste de Timor. Isto era completamente implausível — Canberra tem uma extensa rede de agentes dos serviços de informações a operarem em Timor-Leste, bem como uma inteira divisão dos serviços de informações, a Directoria de Sinais de Defesa, dedicada a monitorizar comunicações electrónicas.

Nos dias antes da morte de Reinado, o antigo major fez e recebeu 47 chamadas telefónicas para a Austrália. Continua-se a não se saber com quem ele falava. Autoridades Timorenses expressaram frustração sobre a dificuldade que têm experimentado a obter informação das autoridades dos serviços de informações Australianas acerca das gravações de voz e do texto das mensagens que interceptaram. Autoridades Indonésias, por outro lado, forneceram imediatamente as suas informações em relação com várias chamadas que Reinado fez para o país.

Investigadores Timorenses estão também à espera por informações relativas a uma conta dum banco de Darwin, contendo um $US1 milhão, q que Reinado tinha acesso. De acordo com o procurador-geral de Timor-Leste Longinhos Monteiro, Reinado foi informado que o dinheiro tinha sido depositado na conta numa mensagem de texto enviada por Angelita Pires, a sua amante e antiga intermediária com os militares Australianos, Presidente Ramos-Horta, Salsinha, e muitos dos homens de Reinado têm todos acusados Pires de manipular Reinado e de provocar a violência em 11 de Fevereiro. Não foram ainda feitas acusações criminosas contra ela.

Ramos-Horta tem pedido publicamente que Canberra explique como a soma do milhão de dólares passou sem detecção, particularmente à luz dos alertas automáticos que se aplicam por rotina a grandes depósito sob as rigorosas leis bancárias da Austrália. Ele também condenou a falta de acção do governo Australiano. “Dois meses [depois] e não vi nenhuma acção para forçar o banco na Austrália para libertar a informação,” disse ele na ABC radio. “Quero isto resolvido muito, muito rapidamente, de ouro modo levarei a questão ao conselho de segurança da ONU.”

Este ultimato extraordinário teve resposta com a garantia do ministro dos estrangeiros Stephen Smith que a informação relevante será partilhada logo que “procedimentos apropriados” sejam seguidos pelas autoridades Timorenses.

O aparente jogar à defesa do governo Labor de Rudd alimentou rumores em Dili que pessoal Australiano teve uma mão nos eventos de 11 de Fevereiro. Um artigo de 22 de Abril no The Australian sublinhava: “Isso deve perturbar a Austrália — que lidera a não amada Força Internacional de Estabilização, que foi levada a afiar a sua imagem fazendo anúncios nos jornais que mostram um soldado Australiano a apertar a mão a um garoto Timorense — que os Timorenses interpretarão afirmações do dinheiro [depositado em Darwin] como prova poderosa de que Australianos não-Timorenses estiveram a suportar Reinado e a Srª Pires.”
A peça continuava: “As coisas estão agora a descarrilar, com muitos Timorenses convencidos que os ataques de 11 de Fevereiro tiveram tudo a ver com o petróleo e gás do Timor Gap, com a Austrália não contente em ficar com a parte de leão que já tem e por isso, de certo modo a tentar executar a liderança de Timor de modo a deitar a mão a mais dinheiro do país em luta. Gente comum avisá-lo-à muito calmamente, com os olhos abertos, que isto é realmente uma batalha entre a Austrália e Indonésia vs China.”

Estes rumores apontam para a escalada de hostilidade contra a ocupação Australiana de Timor-Leste em curso. Quanto credíveis são é outra questão. Uma explicação mais credível do que Canberra estar envolvida em “tentar executar a liderança de Timor” é que as autoridades Australianas sabiam e talvez participaram num plano para eliminar Reinado. O antigo major tinha servido os seus propósitos em relação ao que interessava ao governo Australiano, e agora estava a ameaçar a derrubar o governo de Gusmão alinhado com Canberra, e por isso a abrir a porta para a Fretilin regressar ao poder. Tendo gasto recursos significativos a derrubar Alkatiri em 2006, isto era a última coisa que os estrategas Australianos queriam.

A rendição de Salsinha tem sido elogiada nos media internacionais como um passo grande para a paz e estabilidade em Timor-Leste, mas a potencialmente explosiva crise política mantém-se por resolver.
Enquanto estava em recuperação na Austrália, o Presidente Ramos-Horta disse que ainda receava pela sua vida e que estava a considerar sair de modo a escrever as memórias em Paris. Agora em Dili, contudo, insiste que não tem nenhuma intenção de resignar. Tem repetido o seu apoio a eleições antecipadas a realizar no início do próximo ano, e pediu também à Fretilin para formar um gabinete sombra, “para contribuir para o desenvolvimento do país”. O gesto tem sido interpretado em Dili como uma expressão de apoio para uma potencial administração liderada pela Fretilin. Num discurso ao parlamento Timorense em 23 de Abril, Ramos-Horta disse que vai perdoar a Rogério Lobato, um deputado de topo da Fretilin Mque foi condenado por armar civis durante a crise de 2006. O caso de Lobato foi uma parte importante de alegações falsas emitidas pelo programa “Four Corners” da ABC que Alkatiri tinha armado um “esquadrão de ataque” para assassinar opositores da Fretilin. O trabalho de difamação da ABC foi usado por Gusmão e pelo governo Australiano para pressionar Alkatiri a resignar.

A promessa de Ramos-Horta para dar uma amnistia a Lobato tem sido denunciada pelos media Australianos. O seu aparente afastamento de Gusmão e aproximação à Fretilin será mal recebido da mesma maneira. Com toda a probabilidade a resposta de Canberra será aumentar as suas manobras por baixo da mesa e jogadas porcas que visam cobrir os seus significativos interesses económicos e estratégicos no país pequeno e empobrecido.

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.