quinta-feira, março 06, 2008

East Timor forfeits its newest hero

Carole Reckinger and Sara Gonzalez Devant- 6 March 2008
Red Pepper

Following the attack on East Timor president Jose Ramos Horta, Carole Reckinger and Sara Gonzalez Devant report on the complexities surrounding the current crisis

Two weeks ago, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) news and analysis service reported that Timor-Leste’s quiescent security environment ‘breached only occasionally, as with two recent small explosions in Dili … and the rare provocation by Alfredo Reinado … is conducive for Timor-Leste to carry out its much needed reforms.’

The report was published only hours before Timor-Leste’s president Jose Ramos-Horta was shot and Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao ambushed on the morning of 11 February 2008. The president is recovering in a hospital in Australia, having regained consciousness after a ten day induced coma.

On the day of the attack a state of emergency was instated and arrest warrants issued against 17 people. Among them, Gastao Salsinha, reportedly in command of the defectors after their leader Alfredo Reinado, a former military police major, was killed during the attack on Ramos-Horta.
Incredulity and anger prevails in Dili. International forces dispatched to Timor-Leste to keep the peace have met with harsh criticism for their failure to prevent the attack. The incident has also triggered anger and distrust among the population. However, the significance of the attack does not lie in the security forces failings.

The assault on the supreme constitutional symbols – prime minister and president- the very heroes of the liberation struggle, lays bare Timor’s national identity crisis. Not only because the country was so close to losing its icons but because it lost its newest icon in Alfredo Reinado. He was given a hero’s burial in Dili, his coffin draped in the Timorese flag and, as BBC article reports, ‘his bearded face looked down defiantly from banners in a revolutionary pose that deliberately aped the portraits they used to host of Xanana Gusmao.’

Military and police under a single command

In an attempt to catch Reinado’s men East Timor‘s authorities have merged police and army under a single command.

The underlying rationale is that necessary to guarantee the adequate mobilization of security and defence forces during the state of exception. But the decision has sparked criticism. The lack of a clear separation between internal and external security may be fatal for the nascent security institutions and lead to tension as it did in 2006. Then, after the sacking of mutinous soldiers, rioting resulted in at least 37 deaths and the displacement of over 150,000 people.

The 2006 crisis and the breakdown of security forces

In April 2006 Dili went up in flames after 600 soldiers protested against discrimination within the ranks of the newly formed Timorese army. The protesters, ‘or petitioners’, were summarily dismissed. Clashes between elements of the national police force (PNTL) and the military (F-FDTL) led to a power vacuum and the breakdown of law and order across the country.

Neither the PNTL nor the F-FDTL had the trust of the population or the capacity to provide adequate security and order. Repeated allegations of sexual harassment, human rights violations, illegal weapons distribution and engagement in illicit trade weakened the public’s confidence in the PNTL in particular. As the 2006 crisis demonstrated neither police nor military were politically neutral, both institutions fragmented due to mixed regional and political loyalties in the ranks, although ethnic and regional divisions had not previously been prominent in Timor-Leste.

With the collapse of the security sector and law and order in general, a multinational peacekeeping force was requested to restore order in late May 2006. Since then efforts have been made to resolve the multiple issues affecting both institutions, but reversing the breakdown is not a simple task.

Reinado, the symbol of a disillusioned Timor-Leste

Reinado, one of the leaders of the mutineers, emerged from the 2006 crisis as a key player. His popularity is remarkable, even after apparently leading an attack on the two most prominent (living) heroes of the liberation struggle. A BBC report cautioned that ‘there is something worrying about the readiness of East Timor‘s young to pass the hero’s mantle on to a man like Reinado, who took up arms against the government in the chaos of May 2006 and refused to lay them down. Reinado had nothing to offer East Timor except the continued idealization of armed struggle as an alternative to the unglamorous task of building a country from very little.’

But analysis such as the BBC’s cites overemphasizes the institutional failings of the Timorese state and pays little attention to the role of popular perception in articulating the country’s predicament. The crisis exists as much on the streets of Dili as it does at the state level. It is not quite as simple as glamour versus nation building. Nation building is a highly political moment, particularly after a major political crisis, and politics are key to Reinado’s popularity. But to understand his popular appeal focus must shift away from the institutional context and to a major societal crisis that has been ongoing since 2006- internal displacement.

Internal displacement

The vast majority of the persons displaced during the 2006 crisis have not returned to their homes. About 100,000 refugees remain in camps. Of these, 30,000 are in the capital Dili. To reduce camp populations and fearing some camps would become permanent, authorities decided to cut food rations in February 2008 with food aid ending completely by March 2008. But with the state of emergency this decision could not have come at a worse time.

Atul Khare, UN Special Representative for the Secretary General in Timor-Leste, has explained that resettlement is extremely complex, because it involves addressing land and property issues and community hostility. The UN humanitarian coordinator also said that ‘for many IDPs [internally Displaced People] it is simply not an option for them to return to their neighborhoods as the people there don’t want them back... Six thousand of their houses have been burned and only 450 transitional shelters have been built to date. There is nowhere to go back to.’

The rise and fall of Alfredo Reinado

Reinado became a symbol of the disenfranchised – youths, the poor, veterans –and key to balancing peace in East Timor. Shortly after his arrest in 2006, he escaped from Becora prison along with 56 other inmates, later boasting that he waved at New Zealand soldiers as he left. In March 2007 the president at this time, Xanana Gusmao, sanctioned an Australian operation to capture Reinado after his men raided weapons from a police post. The operation resulted in several deaths but Reinado eluded capture, his popularity growing among Dili youths. He was able to represent the projected hopes of many of those for whom independence brought more disappointment and poverty.

Reinado was a liability but also bold and charismatic. His defiant messages to the authorities and vanishing acts made him a romantic figure that resonated with a generation that had lost its heroes. Journalist Max Stahl has likened him to Che Guevara, ‘a poster figure on laptops, and graffiti sketches around Dili.’

While most media reports have been quick to qualify the attacks as a coup or assassination attempt, others are more cautious. The emerging theory is Reinado was losing his support base among the petitioners. It is likely the attack, increasingly rumored to have been an attempted kidnapping rather than an assassination attempt or coup, was a pre-emptive move to prevent the impending defection of his support base.

There is a thin line between rumour, misinformation and premature conclusions as reported in the media. Observers have increasingly focused on the fact very little is known about what actually happened on the morning of the 11 February. As one blogger has observed, even of what little is known there are conflicting reports:

’I have heard/read "Alfredo shot in a bedroom/shot at the front gate", "shooting started at 6:50am versus Alfredo shot 30 minutes before the President", "kidnap not assassination", "PM Xanana knew nothing about what happened 40 minutes before / made fully aware", my cyclist friend [who warned the President of gun-shots when he was returning home from his morning exercise, moments before he was shot] has been elevated to diplomat but downgraded to jogger.’
Reinado’s popularity even after his death attests to a social reality that is quite different from what appears in the international media-the hero of the disenfranchised, rather than the outlandish renegade. Timor-Leste may have lost its most recent hero in Reinado but the nature of his achievements is perhaps more emblematic of Timor-Leste’s youths’ frustrations and loss of purpose.

Sara Gonzalez Devant and Carole Reckinger are freelance writers who worked in Timor-Leste in 2005-2006.


Tradução:

Timor-Leste perde o seu herói mais novo

Carole Reckinger e Sara Gonzalez Devant- 6 Março 2008
Red Pepper

Após o ataque ao presidente de Timor-Leste José Ramos Horta, Carole Reckinger e Sara Gonzalez Devant relatam sobre as complexidades que rodeiam a crise corrente

Há duas semanas, o Gabinete das Nações Unidas para a Coordenação dos Assuntos Humanitários (OCHA) notícias e análises de serviço relatavam que o ambiente de segurança tranquilo em Timor-Leste ‘quebrado apenas ocasionalmente, como quando das recentes pequenas explosões em Dili … e as raras provocações por Alfredo Reinado … é apropriado para Timor-Leste desenvolver as suas muito necessárias reformas.’

O relatório foi publicado poucas horas antes do presidente de Timor-Leste José Ramos-Horta ser baleado e do Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão emboscado na manhã de 11 Fevereiro de 2008. O presidente está a recuperar num hospital na Austrália, tendo reganho a consciência dez dias depois dum coma induzido.

No dia do ataque foi declarado o estado de emergência e emitidos mandatos de captura contra 17 pessoas. Entre elas, Gastão Salsinha, segundo se disse no comando dos desertores depois do líder deles Alfredo Reinado, um antigo major da polícia militar, ser morto no ataque a Ramos-Horta.
Prevalecem em Díli a incredibilidade e a raiva. As forças internacionais despachadas para Timor-Leste para manterem a paz foram confrontadas com críticas duras pelo falhanço em prevenirem o ataque. O incidente desencadeou ainda raiva e desconfiança no seio da população. Contudo, o significado do ataque não está nos falhanços das forças de segurança.

O assalto aos símbolos constitucionais supremos – primeiro-ministro e presidente – os heróis da luta da libertação, deixam a nú a crise de identidade nacional de Timor. Não apenas porque o país esteve tão perto de perder os ícones mas porque perdeu o seu ícone mais novo em Alfredo Reinado. Foi-lhe dado um funeral de herói em Dili, o seu caixão embrulhado na bandeira Timorense e, como relatam artigos da BBC, ‘a sua face barbuda a olhar em desafio de cartazes numa postura revolucionária a imitarem deliberadamente a imagem que Xanana Gusmão costumava ter.’

Militares e polícias sob um comando único

Numa tentativa para apanhar os homens de Reinado as autoridades de Timor-Leste juntaram a polícia e as forças armadas num único comando.

As razões que sub-jazem é que é necessário garantir uma mobilização adequada das forças de segurança e defesa durante o estado de excepção. Mas a decisão desencadeou críticas. A falta duma separação clara entre a segurança interna e externa pode ser fatal para as instituições de segurança nascentes e levarem a tensões como ocorreram em 2006. Então, depois do despedimento dos soldados amotinados, os distúrbios resultaram em pelo menos 37 mortes e à deslocação de mais de 150,000 pessoas.

A crise de 2006 e o colapso das forças de segurança

Em Abril 2006 Dili rebentou em chamas depois de 600 soldados protestarem contra a discriminação dentro das fileiras das recentemente formadas forças armadas Timorenses. Os manifestantes, ‘ou peticionários’, foram sumariamente demitidos. Confrontos entre elementos da força da polícia nacional (PNTL) e as forças militares (F-FDTL) levaram a um vácuo de poder e ao colapso da lei e da ordem através do país.

Nem a PNTL nem as F-FDTL tinham a confiança da população ou a capacidade para providenciar a adequada segurança e ordem. Alegações repetidas de assédio sexual, violações de direitos humanos, distribuição ilegal de armas e de engajamento em negócios ilícitos enfraqueceram a confiança pública na PNTL em particular. Como demonstrou a crise de 2006 nem a polícia nem as forças militares eram politicamente neutras, ambas as instituições fragmentaram-se devido a um misto de lealdades regionais e políticas nas fileiras, apesar de anteriormente não terem sido proeminentes as divisões regionais em Timor-Leste.

Com o colapso do sector da segurança e da lei e ordem em geral, foi pedida uma força multinacional de manutenção da paz para restaurar a ordem no fim de Maio de 2006. Desde então têm-se feito esforços para resolver as questões múltiplas que afectam ambas as instituições, mas reverter o colapso não tem sido uma tarefa simples.

Reinado, o símbolo dum Timor-Leste desiludido

Reinado, um dos líderes dos amotinados, emergiu da crise de 2006 como um jogador chave. A sua popularidade é notável, mesmo depois de ter aparentemente liderado um ataque aos dois mais proeminentes heróis (vivos) da luta da libertação. Um relato da BBC avisava que ‘há algo de preocupante acerca da prontidão da juventude de Timor-Leste a fazer de herói um homem como Reinado, que pegou em armas contra o governo no caos de Maio de 2006 e recusou-se a entregá-las. Reinado não tinha nada a oferecer a Timor-Leste excepto a continuação duma luta armada idealizada como uma alternativa à tarefa sem glamour de construção duma nação a partir de muito pouco.’

Mas análises como as que a BBC cita exageram na ênfase dos falhanços institucionais do Estado Timorense e prestam pouca atenção ao papel da percepção popular em articular os predicamentos do país. A crise existe tanto nas ruas de Dili como ao nível do Estado. Não é tão simples como glamour versus construção de nação. A construção de nação é um momento altamente político, particularmente depois duma crise política maior, e as políticas são a chave da popularidade de Reinado. Mas para se perceber a atracção popular por ele tem que se mudar o foco do contexto institucional para uma crise societal maior em curso desde as deslocações internas de 2006.

Deslocações

A vasta maioria das pessoas deslocadas durante a crise de 2006 não regressaram para as suas casas. Mantém-se nos campos cerca de 100,000 deslocados. Destes, 30,000 estão na capital Dili. Para reduzir as populações nos campos e receando que alguns dos campos se tornassem permanentes, as autoridades decidiram cortar as rações de ajuda em Fevereiro de 2008 e a acabar totalmente com a ajuda alimentar em Março de 2008. Mas com o estado de emergência a decisão não podia ter vindo em pior altura.

Atul Khare, o Representante Especial do Secretário-Geral em Timor-Leste, explicou que o reestabelecimento é extremamente complexo, porque envolve resolver questões de terras e propriedades e hostilidade comunitária. O coordenador humanitário da ONU disse também que ‘para muitos deslocados não é opção regressarem aos seus bairros porque as pessoas de lá não os querem de volta... Seis mil das suas casas foram queimadas e apenas 450 abrigos transitórios foram construídos até à data. Não há local para onde regressarem.’

A subida e queda de Alfredo Reinado

Reinado tornou-se um símbolo dos destituídos – jovens, pobres, veteranos – e chave para equilibrar a paz em Timor-Leste. Pouco depois da sua prisão em 2006, escapou-se da prisão de Becora juntamente com outros 56 presos, gabando-se mais tarde de ter acenado aos soldados da Nova Zelândia quando saiu. Em Março de 2007 o então presidente, Xanana Gusmão, autorizou uma operação Australiana para capturar Reinado depois dos seus homens terem assaltado um posto de polícia e roubado as armas. A operação resultou em várias mortes mas Reinado escapou, aumentando a sua popularidade entre os jovens de Dili. Ele conseguiu representar as esperanças projectadas de muitos daqueles a quem a independência trouxe mais desilusão e pobreza.

Reinado era imprevisível mas também descarado e carismático. As suas mensagens desafiantes para com as autoridades e actos de desaparecer tornaram-no uma figura romântica que condizia com uma geração que tinha perdido os seus heróis. O jornalista Max Stahl comparou-o a Che Guevara, ‘uma figura de cartaz em computadores e desenhos graffiti à volta de Dili.’

Enquanto a maioria dos relatos dos media foram rápidos a qualificar os ataques como um golpe ou uma tentativa de assassínio, outros foram mais cautelosos. A teoria que está a emergir é que Reinado estava a perder a base de apoio entre os peticionários. É provável que o ataque, segundo rumores crescentes tenha sido uma tentativa de rapto em vez dum golpe ou tentativa de assassínio, e era um movimento pre-emptivo para evitar a deserção iminente da sua base de apoio.

Há uma linha ténue entre rumor, desinformação e conclusões prematuras conforme noticiados nos media. Os observadores estão crescentemente a focar no facto de se saber muito pouco sobre o que ocorreu realmente na manhã de 11 de Fevereiro. Como sublinhou um blogger, mesmo do muito pouco que se sabe há relatos que se contradizem:

’Houvi/li que "Alfredo foi baleado num quarto/no portão da frente", "que o tiroteio começou às 6:50 am versus Alfredo baleado 30 minutos antes do Presidente", "rapto não assassinato", "PM Xanana nada soube sobre o que aconteceu 40 minutos antes /foi totalmente informado", o meu amigo ciclista [que avisou o Presidente de disparos quando ele regressava a casa do seu exercício matinal, momentos antes de ser baleado] foi elevado a diplomata mas desclassificado como jogger.’
A popularidade de Reinado mesmo depois da sua morte atesta uma realidade social que é bastante diferente do que aparece nos media internacionais – o herói dos destituídos em vez do renegado estranho. Timor-Leste com Reinado pode ter perdido o seu herói mais recente mas a natureza das suas realizações e talvez mais emblemática das frustrações e perda de propósito dos jovens de Timor-Leste.

Sara Gonzalez Devant e Carole Reckinger são escritoras livres que trabalharam em Timor-Leste em 2005-2006.

4 comentários:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Timor-Leste perde o seu herói mais novo
Carole Reckinger e Sara Gonzalez Devant- 6 Março 2008
Red Pepper

Após o ataque ao presidente de Timor-Leste José Ramos Horta, Carole Reckinger e Sara Gonzalez Devant relatam sobre as complexidades que rodeiam a crise corrente

Há duas semanas, o Gabinete das Nações Unidas para a Coordenação dos Assuntos Humanitários (OCHA) notícias e análises de serviço relatavam que o ambiente de segurança tranquilo em Timor-Leste ‘quebrado apenas ocasionalmente, como quando das recentes pequenas explosões em Dili … e as raras provocações por Alfredo Reinado … é apropriado para Timor-Leste desenvolver as suas muito necessárias reformas.’

O relatório foi publicado poucas horas antes do presidente de Timor-Leste José Ramos-Horta ser baleado e do Primeiro-Ministro Xanana Gusmão emboscado na manhã de 11 Fevereiro de 2008. O presidente está a recuperar num hospital na Austrália, tendo reganho a consciência dez dias depois dum coma induzido.

No dia do ataque foi declarado o estado de emergência e emitidos mandatos de captura contra 17 pessoas. Entre elas, Gastão Salsinha, segundo se disse no comando dos desertores depois do líder deles Alfredo Reinado, um antigo major da polícia militar, ser morto no ataque a Ramos-Horta.
Prevalecem em Díli a incredibilidade e a raiva. As forças internacionais despachadas para Timor-Leste para manterem a paz foram confrontadas com críticas duras pelo falhanço em prevenirem o ataque. O incidente desencadeou ainda raiva e desconfiança no seio da população. Contudo, o significado do ataque não está nos falhanços das forças de segurança.

O assalto aos símbolos constitucionais supremos – primeiro-ministro e presidente – os heróis da luta da libertação, deixam a nú a crise de identidade nacional de Timor. Não apenas porque o país esteve tão perto de perder os ícones mas porque perdeu o seu ícone mais novo em Alfredo Reinado. Foi-lhe dado um funeral de herói em Dili, o seu caixão embrulhado na bandeira Timorense e, como relatam artigos da BBC, ‘a sua face barbuda a olhar em desafio de cartazes numa postura revolucionária a imitarem deliberadamente a imagem que Xanana Gusmão costumava ter.’

Militares e polícias sob um comando único

Numa tentativa para apanhar os homens de Reinado as autoridades de Timor-Leste juntaram a polícia e as forças armadas num único comando.

As razões que sub-jazem é que é necessário garantir uma mobilização adequada das forças de segurança e defesa durante o estado de excepção. Mas a decisão desencadeou críticas. A falta duma separação clara entre a segurança interna e externa pode ser fatal para as instituições de segurança nascentes e levarem a tensões como ocorreram em 2006. Então, depois do despedimento dos soldados amotinados, os distúrbios resultaram em pelo menos 37 mortes e à deslocação de mais de 150,000 pessoas.

A crise de 2006 e o colapso das forças de segurança

Em Abril 2006 Dili rebentou em chamas depois de 600 soldados protestarem contra a discriminação dentro das fileiras das recentemente formadas forças armadas Timorenses. Os manifestantes, ‘ou peticionários’, foram sumariamente demitidos. Confrontos entre elementos da força da polícia nacional (PNTL) e as forças militares (F-FDTL) levaram a um vácuo de poder e ao colapso da lei e da ordem através do país.

Nem a PNTL nem as F-FDTL tinham a confiança da população ou a capacidade para providenciar a adequada segurança e ordem. Alegações repetidas de assédio sexual, violações de direitos humanos, distribuição ilegal de armas e de engajamento em negócios ilícitos enfraqueceram a confiança pública na PNTL em particular. Como demonstrou a crise de 2006 nem a polícia nem as forças militares eram politicamente neutras, ambas as instituições fragmentaram-se devido a um misto de lealdades regionais e políticas nas fileiras, apesar de anteriormente não terem sido proeminentes as divisões regionais em Timor-Leste.

Com o colapso do sector da segurança e da lei e ordem em geral, foi pedida uma força multinacional de manutenção da paz para restaurar a ordem no fim de Maio de 2006. Desde então têm-se feito esforços para resolver as questões múltiplas que afectam ambas as instituições, mas reverter o colapso não tem sido uma tarefa simples.

Reinado, o símbolo dum Timor-Leste desiludido

Reinado, um dos líderes dos amotinados, emergiu da crise de 2006 como um jogador chave. A sua popularidade é notável, mesmo depois de ter aparentemente liderado um ataque aos dois mais proeminentes heróis (vivos) da luta da libertação. Um relato da BBC avisava que ‘há algo de preocupante acerca da prontidão da juventude de Timor-Leste a fazer de herói um homem como Reinado, que pegou em armas contra o governo no caos de Maio de 2006 e recusou-se a entregá-las. Reinado não tinha nada a oferecer a Timor-Leste excepto a continuação duma luta armada idealizada como uma alternativa à tarefa sem glamour de construção duma nação a partir de muito pouco.’

Mas análises como as que a BBC cita exageram na ênfase dos falhanços institucionais do Estado Timorense e prestam pouca atenção ao papel da percepção popular em articular os predicamentos do país. A crise existe tanto nas ruas de Dili como ao nível do Estado. Não é tão simples como glamour versus construção de nação. A construção de nação é um momento altamente político, particularmente depois duma crise política maior, e as políticas são a chave da popularidade de Reinado. Mas para se perceber a atracção popular por ele tem que se mudar o foco do contexto institucional para uma crise societal maior em curso desde as deslocações internas de 2006.

Deslocações

A vasta maioria das pessoas deslocadas durante a crise de 2006 não regressaram para as suas casas. Mantém-se nos campos cerca de 100,000 deslocados. Destes, 30,000 estão na capital Dili. Para reduzir as populações nos campos e receando que alguns dos campos se tornassem permanentes, as autoridades decidiram cortar as rações de ajuda em Fevereiro de 2008 e a acabar totalmente com a ajuda alimentar em Março de 2008. Mas com o estado de emergência a decisão não podia ter vindo em pior altura.

Atul Khare, o Representante Especial do Secretário-Geral em Timor-Leste, explicou que o reestabelecimento é extremamente complexo, porque envolve resolver questões de terras e propriedades e hostilidade comunitária. O coordenador humanitário da ONU disse também que ‘para muitos deslocados não é opção regressarem aos seus bairros porque as pessoas de lá não os querem de volta... Seis mil das suas casas foram queimadas e apenas 450 abrigos transitórios foram construídos até à data. Não há local para onde regressarem.’

A subida e queda de Alfredo Reinado

Reinado tornou-se um símbolo dos destituídos – jovens, pobres, veteranos – e chave para equilibrar a paz em Timor-Leste. Pouco depois da sua prisão em 2006, escapou-se da prisão de Becora juntamente com outros 56 presos, gabando-se mais tarde de ter acenado aos soldados da Nova Zelândia quando saiu. Em Março de 2007 o então presidente, Xanana Gusmão, autorizou uma operação Australiana para capturar Reinado depois dos seus homens terem assaltado um posto de polícia e roubado as armas. A operação resultou em várias mortes mas Reinado escapou, aumentando a sua popularidade entre os jovens de Dili. Ele conseguiu representar as esperanças projectadas de muitos daqueles a quem a independência trouxe mais desilusão e pobreza.

Reinado era imprevisível mas também descarado e carismático. As suas mensagens desafiantes para com as autoridades e actos de desaparecer tornaram-no uma figura romântica que condizia com uma geração que tinha perdido os seus heróis. O jornalista Max Stahl comparou-o a Che Guevara, ‘uma figura de cartaz em computadores e desenhos graffiti à volta de Dili.’

Enquanto a maioria dos relatos dos media foram rápidos a qualificar os ataques como um golpe ou uma tentativa de assassínio, outros foram mais cautelosos. A teoria que está a emergir é que Reinado estava a perder a base de apoio entre os peticionários. É provável que o ataque, segundo rumores crescentes tenha sido uma tentativa de rapto em vez dum golpe ou tentativa de assassínio, e era um movimento pre-emptivo para evitar a deserção iminente da sua base de apoio.

Há uma linha ténue entre rumor, desinformação e conclusões prematuras conforme noticiados nos media. Os observadores estão crescentemente a focar no facto de se saber muito pouco sobre o que ocorreu realmente na manhã de 11 de Fevereiro. Como sublinhou um blogger, mesmo do muito pouco que se sabe há relatos que se contradizem:

’Houvi/li que "Alfredo foi baleado num quarto/no portão da frente", "que o tiroteio começou às 6:50 am versus Alfredo baleado 30 minutos antes do Presidente", "rapto não assassinato", "PM Xanana nada soube sobre o que aconteceu 40 minutos antes /foi totalmente informado", o meu amigo ciclista [que avisou o Presidente de disparos quando ele regressava a casa do seu exercício matinal, momentos antes de ser baleado] foi elevado a diplomata mas desclassificado como jogger.’
A popularidade de Reinado mesmo depois da sua morte atesta uma realidade social que é bastante diferente do que aparece nos media internacionais – o herói dos destituídos em vez do renegado estranho. Timor-Leste com Reinado pode ter perdido o seu herói mais recente mas a natureza das suas realizações e talvez mais emblemática das frustrações e perda de propósito dos jovens de Timor-Leste.

Sara Gonzalez Devant e Carole Reckinger são escritoras livres que trabalharam em Timor-Leste em 2005-2006.

Anónimo disse...

Tudo é de lamentar, após ter acontecido os desastres e agora os pretextos e exames de consciência. A verdade é que os militares e os polícias timorenses andaram a exibir as sua forças. Um comando único, exige obediência, disciplina e lealdade à Patria. Que os soldados, militares ou polícias cumpram os seus deveres para com o Estado e a Nação, e não para satisfazer os interesses de um partido ou um grupo de elite. O que se tem verificado é que os militares não querem que os polícias tenham mais prvilégios do que eles, causando assim uma situação de desconfiança e disputas de galões. É urgente ao País criar escolas e centros de instrução militar, preparar cadetes militares que sejam cultos instruídos para poderem actuar com sentido e razão. Não queremos soldados analfabrutos que tudo resolvem a força de armas. Timor precisa de oficiais com cultura, que saibam pensar e agir segundo as normas e as leis militares. Os soldados devem possuir uma certa instrução. Não podemos formar militares e polícias que só sabem apertar gatilhos, e que nunca souberam usar da cabeça para pensarem. As consequências são muito gravíssimas como estas que estamos a experimentar com os rebeldes ou desertores. Que não volte a acontecer mais desastres deste tipo num país que lutou muito para conquistar a sua liberdade e que no fim veio a ser vendido por um preço muito reles.

Anónimo disse...

O que é que tinha Reinado de especial? Que tipo de cultura teve e qual a sua influência sobre a camada jovem da populção? ESteve na Austrália e aprendeu a falar o Inglês e a expressar-se um pouco melhor que os outros militares. Que mais teve ele senão a exibição das suas habilidades nas artes marciais e que depois serviu-se da população ignorante da parte oeste para poder impôr os seus desejos.Que a camada jovem ignorante das regiões da parte oeste venham a pensar que ele é um grande líder ou um grande chefe. Ele foi apenas um desertor militar que desobedeceu as leis militares pada poder sublevar a população e assim estabelecer a insegurança no país.

Anónimo disse...

For the Wise,Alfredo was the true East timor Hero. Not like the ones fabricated like Xana and Horta.That's why Alfredo was always a thorn for both Xanana and Horta. His latest accusations in a video against Xanana was a catalyst for his premature death.Alfredo might be physically dead but his Nationalist and anti Communist spirit lives on in the heart of East Timor. The same cannot be said of Che Guevara.

Rest in Peace and in God's Love, East Timor's Hero

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.