sábado, março 01, 2008

A nation caught under the barrel

Paul Toohey March 01, 2008
The Australian

HOW do three or four generations of East Timorese who have grown up knowing violence take another path?

At this time, the question is the same as the answer: with more violence or the promise of it. In Dili, the capital, the symbol of peace is the gun.

Young children on their daily rounds routinely see hundreds of men - their own people or those wearing the uniforms of different nations - standing on street corners, or on patrol, or guarding important people, with automatic weapons at the ready. They are learning the same lessons as their parents and grandparents.

East Timor is riddled with all forms of weaponry, the kind held by legitimate forces and the clandestine. In Timor, the AK47, the FN and the Steyr automatic rifles form the coalition ruling party, along with the big, white, crowd-controlling, water-blasting monster with UN markings that has been prowling the streets of Dili.

A Pakistani soldier stands guard in Ermera, a district to the west of Dili, on a busy Sunday morning market scene. His AK47 - the people's gun - is old and battered and has been handed down to him like an older brother's school clothes. It has seen service in many battles in many countries. It's still a reliable weapon, fitted with a fold-out bayonet for close encounters. He says he hasn't used it in East Timor and he's glad for that. It's a shame that he needs to stand ready to use it in an otherwise pretty hilltop market scene.

A Timorese army guard shows the special trick he has fashioned for his weapon: he has one full 30-round magazine in the chamber and has sticky-taped another loaded magazine to it, upside down. This is so when he uses his 30 rounds he can quickly rip out the old magazine, turn it around and have another 30 shots instantly at his disposal. He is ready for trouble.

The F-FDTL, the East Timorese army, which for a long time has been confined to guarding government offices after losing the nation's trust by firing on peaceful protesters in 2006 - which led to the Alfredo Reinado debacle - moves freely through the city with its automatics. Up in the hills, the International Stablisation Force, made up of Australians, conducts sweeps of outlying villages as camouflage-painted choppers hover above in support.

Even Australian Federal Police officers in East Timor are wearing dark-blue, action-ready overalls. They also have automatic rifles.

Amid this menacing picture, people conduct their un-normal lives. They are subject to a national 8pm curfew. No one knows for sure when and from where trouble will come, but everyone expects it.

On liberation in 1999, it was thought there would be an intense show of aggressive, protective force that would lead to stability. It was thought the country would eventually fall in line behind genuine, passionately peace-oriented leaders such as Xanana Gusmao and Jose Ramos Horta. It didn't happen that way. Instead, Ramos Horta, the President, lies recuperating in the Royal Darwin Hospital, having been shot down in cold blood. And Reinado, the rebel who had a reasonable cause - at least until he became too demanding and unreliable - is buried in a Dili front yard after copping a spray of machinegun fire in the face, neck and chest.

Having known Reinado, I found it a strange thing to stand in a heaving crowd as his family opened the lid on his coffin. There he was, one patch over his eye, dressed in white gloves and dark blue suit, having gone the way of the gun. He had always said he would. But I never believed him. I'm not sure if he really believed it himself.

Yet like many Timorese, Reinado, dead at 42, was born to violence, as was his 56-year-old adoptive father, Victor Alves. Alves, a dignified man, has been chain-smoking cigarettes and taking a constant stream of visitors in the wake of his son's death on February 11. He tells something of his own life. His story, like his country's, is written in blood.

Alves's father was a Portuguese man who came to the Portuguese colony, as it then was, in 1948, after the Japanese occupiers had cleared out. He married a local Timorese woman from Maubisse, above Dili. Alves took on that classic Timorese-Portuguese appearance that can also be seen in the make-up of Gusmao, now the Prime Minister. Under the Portuguese, mixed blood gave him status and opportunity above the ordinary people of full Timorese caste.

Alves became a soldier in 1973 when the motherland, Portugal, was beginning to be dominated by leftists. By 1974, they were in control and had begun a rapid, dysfunctional decolonisation process of their African colonies and in Timor.

Three groups within Timor fought for control, leading to civil war. They were the pro-independence, communist-backed Fretilin; UDT, which wanted gradual independence in association with Portugal; and the lesser Apodeti party, which wanted an autonomous Indonesian state. Alves declines to say where his loyalties lay at that time; he says it's better forgotten. But he gives a clue when he says: "When people say to me, today, 'Hey, comrade,' it doesn't sit well with me." The point he makes is that whichever side he was on, he ended up fighting the Indonesians after they invaded in 1975.

"A lot of people were the same as me. It wasn't a matter of taking political sides. It was about fighting for East Timor. I once probed about 6km into Indonesia (West Timor) and didn't even know where I was. I was 23 or 24. I have many regrets. I went in and shot civilian Indonesian people. I do not want to tell these stories to my own children, I want them to go forth with a good life."

Alves was arrested in a battle with the Indonesians in 1977 and taken to the prison on Atauro island, just off Dili. After declining overtures from a charming Kopassus (Indonesian commando) leader to be released in exchange for joining the Indonesian army, he was freed in 1983 and lived a reasonable life in Dili, while being part of the resistance network.

In 1999, during the lead-up to the disastrous autonomy vote, Alves shot dead a pro-Indonesian militiaman. He served only six months on a negligence charge. No witnesses could be found to say that Alves had acted with intent against the militia. By widespread agreement, he should never have served a day.

That the Indonesians were able to recruit East Timorese as militia to rape and kill their own people in 1999 has never been resolved, despite the truth commissions and Ramos Horta's repeated pleadings that people just move on. It is the sickness in Timor's heart.

Alves's nephew Alfredo was born in 1966 and grew up between Victor's and his mother's households. Alfredo was separated from his mother and went to work as a go-getter for an Indonesian battalion, which required him to assist in the subjugation of his own people, witnessing rape and murder. An Indonesian soldier rotating with his battalion out of East Timor home to Sulawesi took young Reinado with him as his house boy.

Reinado returned to East Timor as a teenager while it was still under Indonesian control. His later life story - of captaining a boat to Australia with 18 people in 1995, including his wife and young child, of working on the Australian wharves and of being trained by the Australian military, and his return to Timor after liberation in 1999 - is well known. His story is just a variation of the tales of many East Timorese, who have come to associate politics with blood.

Now, the Australian peacekeeping force finds itself in a difficult spot in Timor. It came (again) in 2006 at the request of the East Timorese Government to bring stability. It engaged and killed five of Reinado's rebels in Same, then backed off once the Government feared Dili street people, who are deeply divided along east-west ethnic lines, would react badly. As they did.

Then prime minister John Howard refused to put the Australian force under UN control, which on the one hand was a realistic reflection on the UN's overall incompetence but on the other allowed our force to be answerable to an equivocating East Timorese Government that desperately wanted action but was too afraid of the fall-out were it to ask Australia to use its full strength.

Absurd deals were struck whereby Reinado and 16 of his band, after being caught and charged with murder, and having escaped from Dili prison in 2006, were permitted to roam at will for two years with weapons.

Late last year, Ramos Horta and the head of the Australian force, Brigadier John Hutcheson, issued "comfort" letters reconfirming that Reinado and his men would not be apprehended. Whether or not Reinado had a justifiable cause, it was a mistake for Australia to agree to this.

Our soldiers became politicised in a way that never should have been permitted. Yet when Timorese leaders blame the International Stabilisation Force for failing to stop Reinado's men from entering Dili on February11, they ought to reflect on the situation in which they put Australia.

Ramos Horta was Reinado's only real hope. Reinado had slagged off Gusmao in propaganda DVDs, but Ramos Horta had always kept his line open to the rebel. And most everyone in East Timor agrees there's a bigger story behind his murderous visit to the President's compound.

There is no clarity in East Timor, but this much is known: Reinado was due to face murder charges in the Dili court on March 3. Reinado didn't want to turn up, fearing he might be locked up for a long time. But Ramos Horta was always prepared to cut him some slack. Inquirer can reveal some detail of the offer to Reinado.

Reinado wanted a full pardon and a good military job. A joint working party made up of the alliance Government and the Fretilin Opposition were debating on what to give Reinado. It was explained to Reinado that it was possible to pardon a person only after they had been convicted.

Then he wanted a full amnesty. But with Reinado facing eight counts of murder, the reasonable view was that he should stand trial. But it would only be for appearances' sake, after which he would be pardoned. Ramos Horta tried to reassure him of his goodwill, reminding Reinado that he had given 38 such pardons to prisoners on December 28. It was on the table for him to take. He just had to face court.

The working party was all set to approve this, along with other important matters, such as compensation to the many internally displaced people, to bring the hundreds of ex-army petitioners in from their isolation and to arrange for early elections. It was all to be signed off on May 20. Reinado knew it. Either Reinado did not trust submitting himself to the court process or other people got inside his head, telling him Ramos Horta was going to trick him.

After two weeks of deep fog in Timor - to which I have found myself on occasion susceptible - it is clear: it was Reinado's mob that attacked the President and PM. The outstanding questions are why he went there and why he was told he ought not believe Ramos Horta.

East Timor has opened a door that should have stayed locked: assassination. Speaking last week at a joint press conference with Kevin Rudd, Gusmao said: "A bullet can wound a person but never can penetrate the values of democracy."

The problem, however, is that in a small country, a bullet can do precisely that. Especially when one aimed at the only two figures in East Timor with any hope of bringing lasting stability.

Paul Toohey covered the aftermath of the assassination attempt in East Timor.


TRADUÇÃO:

Uma nação sob um cano de arma

Paul Toohey Março 01, 2008
The Australian

Como é que duas ou três gerações de Timorenses que cresceram a conhecer a violência tomam outro caminho?

Nesta altura, a pergunta é igual à resposta: com mais violência ou promessa de mais violência. Em Dili, a capital, o símbolo da paz é uma pistola.

Crianças jovens nas suas voltas do dia-a-dia rotineiras vêem centenas de homens – do seu próprio povo ou de nações diferentes a usar uniformes - em pé nos cantos das ruas, ou em patrulhe ou a guardar pessoas importantes, com armas automáticas prontas a disparar. Estão a aprender a mesma lição dos seus pais e avós.

Timor-Leste está cheio de todos os tipos de armas, usadas pelas forças legítimas e pelas clandestinas. Em Timor a coligação reinante usa as espingardas automáticas AK47, FN e Steyr juntamente com os monstruosos canhões de água enormes, para controlo de multidão, brancos com as marcas UN que circulam pelas ruas de Dili.

Um soldado Paquistanês está de guarda em Ermera, um distrito a oeste de Dili, numa movimentada cena de mercado numa manhã de Domingo. A sua AK47 – a pistola do povo – está velha e gasta e foi-lhe dada como se fosse roupa de dum irmão mais velho. Tem sido usada em muitas batalhas em muitos países. É ainda uma arma fiável, equipada com uma baioneta retráctil para encontros mais próximos. Diz que não a usou em Timor-Leste e que está contente por isso. É uma vergonha que precise de estar pronto para a usar numa de outra maneira bonita cena de mercado no cimo dum monte.

Um guarda das forças armadas Timorenses mostra o truque especial que fabricou para a sua arma: ele tem um tambor com 30 balas e colou com fita cola um outro tambor cheio de cima para baixo. Assim quando gastar 30 balas pode rapidamente tirar o tambor velho, virá-la e ter instantaneamente outras 30 balas à sua disposição. Está pronto para sarilhos.

As F-FDTL, as forças armadas Timorenses, que durante muito tempo estiveram confinadas a guardar edifícios do governo depois de terem perdido a confiança da nação ao dispararem contra manifestantes pacíficos em 2006 – o que levou à fuga de Alfredo Reinado - movimenta-se livremente através da cidade com as suas armas automáticas. Lá em cima nos montes, a Força Internacional de Estabilização, feita de Australianos, conduz operações de limpeza nas aldeias enquanto helicópteros pintados com tinta de camuflado pairam por cima a protegê-los.

Mesmo os oficiais da Polícia Federal Australiana em Timor-Leste estão a usar fatos-de-macaco de serviço azuis escuros. Usam também espingardas automáticas.

No meio desta imagem ameaçadora as pessoas conduzem as suas vidas não normais. Estão sujeitas a um recolher obrigatório desde as 8 pm. Ninguém tem a certeza quando e donde virão os problemas, mas toda a gente espera isso.

Na libertação em 1999, pensava-se que haveria uma enorme prova de força agressiva, protectora que levaria à estabilidade. Pensava-se que eventualmente o país cairia em linha por detrás de líderes genuínos, apaixonadamente orientados para a paz como Xanana Gusmão e José Ramos Horta. Isso não aconteceu dessa maneira. Em vez disso, Ramos Horta, o Presidente, está a recuperar deitado no Royal Darwin Hospital, depois de baleado a sangue frio. E Reinado, o amotinado que tinha uma causa razoável - pelo menos até se tornar demasiado exigente e não confiável – está enterrado num pátio da frente de Dili depois de ter recebido disparos de armas automáticas na face, pescoço e peito.

Tendo conhecido Reinado, achei uma coisa estranha estar no meio duma grande multidão quando a família abriu o caixão. Lá estava ele, um penso no olho, vestido num fato azul escuro e com luvas, tendo partido por causa duma pistola. Tinha sempre dito que assim iria. Mas nunca acreditei nele. Não tenho a certeza que ele realmente acreditasse nisso .

Contudo como muitos Timorenses, Reinado, morto aos 42 anos, nascera para a violência, como acontecera com o seu pai adoptivo de 56 anos, Victor Alves. Alves, um homem digno, tem estado a fumar cigarro após cigarro a receber uma corrente constante de visitas desde o princípio da morte do seu filho em 11 de Fevereiro. Conta algumas coisas da sua própria vida. A sua história, como a do seu país, está escrita com sangue.

O pai de Alves era um Português que veio para uma colónia Portuguesa, como isso era em 1948, depois da saída dos ocupantes Japoneses. Casou com uma Timorense de Maubisse, acima de Dili. Alves tem aquele aspecto clássico Timorense-Português que também se pode ver na aparência de Gusmão, agora Primeiro-Ministro. Sob os Portugueses, o sangue misto deu-lhe estatuto e oportunidade superiores às pessoas vulgares de casta Timorense.

Alves tornou-se soldado em 1973 quando a pátria-mãe, Portugal, estava a começar a ser dominada por esquerdistas. Em 1974, eles estavam no controlo e começaram um processo de descolonização rápido e disfuncional das suas colónias Africanas e em Timor.

Dentro de Timor três grupos lutaram pelo controlo, levando a uma guerra civil. Foram os pró-independência da Fretilin apoiada pelos comunistas; UDT, que queria uma independência gradual em associação com Portugal; e o mais pequeno partido Apodeti que queria um estado autónomo da Indonésia. Alves declina dizer quais foram as suas lealdades nessa altura; diz que é melhor esquecer. Mas deixa uma pista quando diz: "Quando as pessoas me dizem, hoje, 'Olá, camarada,' isso não me agrada." O ponto que ele faz é, fosse qual fosse o lado em que esteve, acabou a lutar contra os Indonésios depois deles terem invadido em 1975.

"Muita gente foi como eu . Não era uma questão de escolher lados políticos. Era lutar por Timor-Leste. Uma vez experimentei entrar 6 km dentro da Indonésia (Oeste Timor) e nem sequer sabia onde estava. Tinha 23 ou 24 anos. Tenho muitos remorsos. Fui lá e disparei contra pessoas civis Indonésias. Não quero contar estas histórias aos meus filhos, quero que eles avancem com uma boa vida."

Alves foi preso numa batalha com os Indonésios em 1977 e levado para uma prisão na ilha Atauro, mesmo em frente a Dili. Depois de negar aberturas dum encantador líder Kopassus (comando Indonésio) para ser libertado em troca de se juntar às forças armadas Indonésias, foi libertado em 1983 e viveu uma vida razoável em Dili, enquanto participava na rede da resistência.

Em 1999, na aproximação do desastroso referendo para a autonomia, Alves matou a tiro um homem das milícias pró-Indonésia. Cumpriu apenas seis meses por acusação de negligência. Não se conseguiu encontrar nenhuma testemunha que dissesse que Alves tinha actuado com intenção contra o homem da milícia. Por acordo alargado, nunca devia ter estado um dia na cadeia.

A questão dos Indonésios terem sido capazes de recrutar Timorenses para as milícias para violar e matar o seu próprio povo em 1999 nunca foi resolvida, apesar das comissões da verdade e dos repetidos apelos de Ramos Horta para as pessoas avançarem. Isso é a doença que está no coração de Timor.

O sobrinho de Alves, Alfredo nasceu em 1966 e cresceu entre a casa de Victor e a da sua mãe. Alfredo foi separado da sua mãe e foi trabalhar como moço de recados para um batalhão Indonésio, que o levou a assistir na subjugação do seu próprio povo, testemunhando violações e homicídios. Um soldado Indonésio que saíu com o seu batalhão de Timor-Leste para Sulawesi levou o jovem Reinado com ele como seu criado de casa.

Reinado regressou a Timor-Leste adolescente quado estava ainda sob controlo Indonésio. A história da sua vida depois – de dirigir um barco para a Austrália com 18 pessoas em 1995, incluindo a mulher e um filho pequeno, de trabalhar nas docas Australianas e de ser formados pelos militares Australianos, e o seu regresso a Timor depois da libertação em 1999 – é bem conhecida. A sua história é apenas uma variação das histórias de muitos Timorenses, que associaram política com sangue.

Agora, as tropas Australianas encontra-se numa situação difícil em Timor. Veio (outra vez) em 2006 a pedido do governo Timorense para trazer estabilidade. Engajou-se e matou cinco dos amotinados de Reinado em Same, depois recuou logo que o Governo receou que as pessoas de rua de Dili, que estão profundamente divididas em linhas étnicas leste-oeste, reagissem mal. Como reagiram

O então primeiro-ministro John Howard recusou pôr a força Australiana sob controlo da ONU, o que por um lado foi uma reflexão realista sobre a incompetência geral da ONU mas por outro lado permitiu que a nossa força respondesse por um equivocado Governo Timorense que queria desesperadamente acção mas estava com demasiado receio de das consequências para pedir à Austrália que usasse toda a força.

Foram feitos acordos absurdos pelos quais Reinado e 16 do seu bando, depois de terem sido apanhados e acusados de homicídio, e de terem escapado da prisão de Dili em 2006, foram autorizados a adar à vontade durante dois anos com armas.

No fim do ano passado, Ramos Horta e o chefe da força Australiana, Brigadeiro John Hutcheson, emitiram cartas de "livre trânsito" re-confirmando que Reinado e os seus homens não seriam detidos. Tivesse ou não tivesse Reinado uma causa justificável, foi um erro da Austrália ter concordado com isso.

Os nossos soldados tornaram-se politizados duma maneira que nunca devia ter sido permitida. Contudo quando líderes Timorenses acusam a Força Internacional de Estabilização pelo falhanço em evitarem a estrada dos homens de Reinado em Dili em 11 de Fevereiro, eles deviam reflectir na situação em que colocaram a Austrália.

Ramos Horta era a única esperança real de Reinado. Reinado tinha gozado com Gusmão num DVD de propaganda, mas Ramos Horta tinha deixado sempre a sua linha aberta para o amotinado. E quase toda a gente em Timor-Leste concorda que há uma história maior por detrás da sua visita assassina ao complexo do Presidente.

Não há nenhuma claridade em Timor-Leste, mas isto é conhecido: Reinado estava prestes a enfrentar acusações de homicídio no tribunal de Dili em 3 de Março. Reinado não queria comparecer, receando ficar preso durante muito tempo. Mas Ramos Horta estava sempre preparado para o libertar de certo modo. Inquirições podem revelar alguns detalhes da oferta a Reinado.

Reinado queria um perdão total e um bom emprego militar. Um grupo de trabalho conjunto formado entre o Governo da aliança e a Fretilin da Oposição estava a debater o que dar a Reinado. Fora explicado a Reinado que apenas é possível perdoar uma pessoa depois dela ter sido condenada.

Depois ele queria uma amnistia completa. Mas com Reinado a enfrentar oito casos de homicídio , a visão razoável é que ele devia ser julgado. Mas isso era apenas em nome das aparências, depois do que seria perdoado. Ramos Horta tentou descansá-lo sobre a sua boa vontade, lembrando a Reinado que tinha dado 38 perdões desse tipo a presos em 28 de Dezembro. Era a vez dele aceitar. Tinha apenas de enfrentar um tribunal.

O grupo de trabalho estava pronto para aprovar isso, juntamente com outras questões importantes, tais como compensações para os deslocados, trazer centenas de peticionários ex-soldados do seu isolamento e tratar de eleições antecipadas. Estava previsto ser tudo assinado em 20 de Maio. Reinado sabia disso. Ou Reinado não confiou entregar-se ao processo judicial ou outra gente o influenciou, dizendo-lhe que Ramos Horta ia enganá-lo.

Depois de duas semanos de grande nevoeiro em Timor – para o qual por vezes me senti susceptível – é claro: foi gente de Reinado que atacou o Presidente e o PM. As questões importantes são porque é que foi lá e porque é que lhe disseram para não acreditar em Ramos Horta.

Timor-Leste abriu uma porta que devia ter ficado fechada: assassínio. Falando na semana passada numa conferência de imprensa conjunta com Kevin Rudd, Gusmão disse: "Uma bala pode ferir uma pessoa, mas nunca pode penetrar nos valores da democracia."

O problema, contudo, é que num pequeno país, uma bala pode fazer precisamente isso. Especialmente quando visa as duas únicas figuras em Timor-Leste com alguma esperança de trazer estabilidade duradoura.

Paul Toohey cobriu o período após a tentativa de assassínio em Timor-Leste.

2 comentários:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Uma nação sob um cano de arma
Paul Toohey Março 01, 2008
The Australian

Como é que duas ou três gerações de Timorenses que cresceram a conhecer a violência tomam outro caminho?

Nesta altura, a pergunta é igual à resposta: com mais violência ou promessa de mais violência. Em Dili, a capital, o símbolo da paz é uma pistola.

Crianças jovens nas suas voltas do dia-a-dia rotineiras vêem centenas de homens – do seu próprio povo ou de nações diferentes a usar uniformes - em pé nos cantos das ruas, ou em patrulhe ou a guardar pessoas importantes, com armas automáticas prontas a disparar. Estão a aprender a mesma lição dos seus pais e avós.

Timor-Leste está cheio de todos os tipos de armas, usadas pelas forças legítimas e pelas clandestinas. Em Timor a coligação reinante usa as espingardas automáticas AK47, FN e Steyr juntamente com os monstruosos canhões de água enormes, para controlo de multidão, brancos com as marcas UN que circulam pelas ruas de Dili.

Um soldado Paquistanês está de guarda em Ermera, um distrito a oeste de Dili, numa movimentada cena de mercado numa manhã de Domingo. A sua AK47 – a pistola do povo – está velha e gasta e foi-lhe dada como se fosse roupa de dum irmão mais velho. Tem sido usada em muitas batalhas em muitos países. É ainda uma arma fiável, equipada com uma baioneta retráctil para encontros mais próximos. Diz que não a usou em Timor-Leste e que está contente por isso. É uma vergonha que precise de estar pronto para a usar numa de outra maneira bonita cena de mercado no cimo dum monte.

Um guarda das forças armadas Timorenses mostra o truque especial que fabricou para a sua arma: ele tem um tambor com 30 balas e colou com fita cola um outro tambor cheio de cima para baixo. Assim quando gastar 30 balas pode rapidamente tirar o tambor velho, virá-la e ter instantaneamente outras 30 balas à sua disposição. Está pronto para sarilhos.

As F-FDTL, as forças armadas Timorenses, que durante muito tempo estiveram confinadas a guardar edifícios do governo depois de terem perdido a confiança da nação ao dispararem contra manifestantes pacíficos em 2006 – o que levou à fuga de Alfredo Reinado - movimenta-se livremente através da cidade com as suas armas automáticas. Lá em cima nos montes, a Força Internacional de Estabilização, feita de Australianos, conduz operações de limpeza nas aldeias enquanto helicópteros pintados com tinta de camuflado pairam por cima a protegê-los.

Mesmo os oficiais da Polícia Federal Australiana em Timor-Leste estão a usar fatos-de-macaco de serviço azuis escuros. Usam também espingardas automáticas.

No meio desta imagem ameaçadora as pessoas conduzem as suas vidas não normais. Estão sujeitas a um recolher obrigatório desde as 8 pm. Ninguém tem a certeza quando e donde virão os problemas, mas toda a gente espera isso.

Na libertação em 1999, pensava-se que haveria uma enorme prova de força agressiva, protectora que levaria à estabilidade. Pensava-se que eventualmente o país cairia em linha por detrás de líderes genuínos, apaixonadamente orientados para a paz como Xanana Gusmão e José Ramos Horta. Isso não aconteceu dessa maneira. Em vez disso, Ramos Horta, o Presidente, está a recuperar deitado no Royal Darwin Hospital, depois de baleado a sangue frio. E Reinado, o amotinado que tinha uma causa razoável - pelo menos até se tornar demasiado exigente e não confiável – está enterrado num pátio da frente de Dili depois de ter recebido disparos de armas automáticas na face, pescoço e peito.

Tendo conhecido Reinado, achei uma coisa estranha estar no meio duma grande multidão quando a família abriu o caixão. Lá estava ele, um penso no olho, vestido num fato azul escuro e com luvas, tendo partido por causa duma pistola. Tinha sempre dito que assim iria. Mas nunca acreditei nele. Não tenho a certeza que ele realmente acreditasse nisso .

Contudo como muitos Timorenses, Reinado, morto aos 42 anos, nascera para a violência, como acontecera com o seu pai adoptivo de 56 anos, Victor Alves. Alves, um homem digno, tem estado a fumar cigarro após cigarro a receber uma corrente constante de visitas desde o princípio da morte do seu filho em 11 de Fevereiro. Conta algumas coisas da sua própria vida. A sua história, como a do seu país, está escrita com sangue.

O pai de Alves era um Português que veio para uma colónia Portuguesa, como isso era em 1948, depois da saída dos ocupantes Japoneses. Casou com uma Timorense de Maubisse, acima de Dili. Alves tem aquele aspecto clássico Timorense-Português que também se pode ver na aparência de Gusmão, agora Primeiro-Ministro. Sob os Portugueses, o sangue misto deu-lhe estatuto e oportunidade superiores às pessoas vulgares de casta Timorense.

Alves tornou-se soldado em 1973 quando a pátria-mãe, Portugal, estava a começar a ser dominada por esquerdistas. Em 1974, eles estavam no controlo e começaram um processo de descolonização rápido e disfuncional das suas colónias Africanas e em Timor.

Dentro de Timor três grupos lutaram pelo controlo, levando a uma guerra civil. Foram os pró-independência da Fretilin apoiada pelos comunistas; UDT, que queria uma independência gradual em associação com Portugal; e o mais pequeno partido Apodeti que queria um estado autónomo da Indonésia. Alves declina dizer quais foram as suas lealdades nessa altura; diz que é melhor esquecer. Mas deixa uma pista quando diz: "Quando as pessoas me dizem, hoje, 'Olá, camarada,' isso não me agrada." O ponto que ele faz é, fosse qual fosse o lado em que esteve, acabou a lutar contra os Indonésios depois deles terem invadido em 1975.

"Muita gente foi como eu . Não era uma questão de escolher lados políticos. Era lutar por Timor-Leste. Uma vez experimentei entrar 6 km dentro da Indonésia (Oeste Timor) e nem sequer sabia onde estava. Tinha 23 ou 24 anos. Tenho muitos remorsos. Fui lá e disparei contra pessoas civis Indonésias. Não quero contar estas histórias aos meus filhos, quero que eles avancem com uma boa vida."

Alves foi preso numa batalha com os Indonésios em 1977 e levado para uma prisão na ilha Atauro, mesmo em frente a Dili. Depois de negar aberturas dum encantador líder Kopassus (comando Indonésio) para ser libertado em troca de se juntar às forças armadas Indonésias, foi libertado em 1983 e viveu uma vida razoável em Dili, enquanto participava na rede da resistência.

Em 1999, na aproximação do desastroso referendo para a autonomia, Alves matou a tiro um homem das milícias pró-Indonésia. Cumpriu apenas seis meses por acusação de negligência. Não se conseguiu encontrar nenhuma testemunha que dissesse que Alves tinha actuado com intenção contra o homem da milícia. Por acordo alargado, nunca devia ter estado um dia na cadeia.

A questão dos Indonésios terem sido capazes de recrutar Timorenses para as milícias para violar e matar o seu próprio povo em 1999 nunca foi resolvida, apesar das comissões da verdade e dos repetidos apelos de Ramos Horta para as pessoas avançarem. Isso é a doença que está no coração de Timor.

O sobrinho de Alves, Alfredo nasceu em 1966 e cresceu entre a casa de Victor e a da sua mãe. Alfredo foi separado da sua mãe e foi trabalhar como moço de recados para um batalhão Indonésio, que o levou a assistir na subjugação do seu próprio povo, testemunhando violações e homicídios. Um soldado Indonésio que saíu com o seu batalhão de Timor-Leste para Sulawesi levou o jovem Reinado com ele como seu criado de casa.

Reinado regressou a Timor-Leste adolescente quado estava ainda sob controlo Indonésio. A história da sua vida depois – de dirigir um barco para a Austrália com 18 pessoas em 1995, incluindo a mulher e um filho pequeno, de trabalhar nas docas Australianas e de ser formados pelos militares Australianos, e o seu regresso a Timor depois da libertação em 1999 – é bem conhecida. A sua história é apenas uma variação das histórias de muitos Timorenses, que associaram política com sangue.

Agora, as tropas Australianas encontra-se numa situação difícil em Timor. Veio (outra vez) em 2006 a pedido do governo Timorense para trazer estabilidade. Engajou-se e matou cinco dos amotinados de Reinado em Same, depois recuou logo que o Governo receou que as pessoas de rua de Dili, que estão profundamente divididas em linhas étnicas leste-oeste, reagissem mal. Como reagiram

O então primeiro-ministro John Howard recusou pôr a força Australiana sob controlo da ONU, o que por um lado foi uma reflexão realista sobre a incompetência geral da ONU mas por outro lado permitiu que a nossa força respondesse por um equivocado Governo Timorense que queria desesperadamente acção mas estava com demasiado receio de das consequências para pedir à Austrália que usasse toda a força.

Foram feitos acordos absurdos pelos quais Reinado e 16 do seu bando, depois de terem sido apanhados e acusados de homicídio, e de terem escapado da prisão de Dili em 2006, foram autorizados a adar à vontade durante dois anos com armas.

No fim do ano passado, Ramos Horta e o chefe da força Australiana, Brigadeiro John Hutcheson, emitiram cartas de "livre trânsito" re-confirmando que Reinado e os seus homens não seriam detidos. Tivesse ou não tivesse Reinado uma causa justificável, foi um erro da Austrália ter concordado com isso.

Os nossos soldados tornaram-se politizados duma maneira que nunca devia ter sido permitida. Contudo quando líderes Timorenses acusam a Força Internacional de Estabilização pelo falhanço em evitarem a estrada dos homens de Reinado em Dili em 11 de Fevereiro, eles deviam reflectir na situação em que colocaram a Austrália.

Ramos Horta era a única esperança real de Reinado. Reinado tinha gozado com Gusmão num DVD de propaganda, mas Ramos Horta tinha deixado sempre a sua linha aberta para o amotinado. E quase toda a gente em Timor-Leste concorda que há uma história maior por detrás da sua visita assassina ao complexo do Presidente.

Não há nenhuma claridade em Timor-Leste, mas isto é conhecido: Reinado estava prestes a enfrentar acusações de homicídio no tribunal de Dili em 3 de Março. Reinado não queria comparecer, receando ficar preso durante muito tempo. Mas Ramos Horta estava sempre preparado para o libertar de certo modo. Inquirições podem revelar alguns detalhes da oferta a Reinado.

Reinado queria um perdão total e um bom emprego militar. Um grupo de trabalho conjunto formado entre o Governo da aliança e a Fretilin da Oposição estava a debater o que dar a Reinado. Fora explicado a Reinado que apenas é possível perdoar uma pessoa depois dela ter sido condenada.

Depois ele queria uma amnistia completa. Mas com Reinado a enfrentar oito casos de homicídio , a visão razoável é que ele devia ser julgado. Mas isso era apenas em nome das aparências, depois do que seria perdoado. Ramos Horta tentou descansá-lo sobre a sua boa vontade, lembrando a Reinado que tinha dado 38 perdões desse tipo a presos em 28 de Dezembro. Era a vez dele aceitar. Tinha apenas de enfrentar um tribunal.

O grupo de trabalho estava pronto para aprovar isso, juntamente com outras questões importantes, tais como compensações para os deslocados, trazer centenas de peticionários ex-soldados do seu isolamento e tratar de eleições antecipadas. Estava previsto ser tudo assinado em 20 de Maio. Reinado sabia disso. Ou Reinado não confiou entregar-se ao processo judicial ou outra gente o influenciou, dizendo-lhe que Ramos Horta ia enganá-lo.

Depois de duas semanos de grande nevoeiro em Timor – para o qual por vezes me senti susceptível – é claro: foi gente de Reinado que atacou o Presidente e o PM. As questões importantes são porque é que foi lá e porque é que lhe disseram para não acreditar em Ramos Horta.

Timor-Leste abriu uma porta que devia ter ficado fechada: assassínio. Falando na semana passada numa conferência de imprensa conjunta com Kevin Rudd, Gusmão disse: "Uma bala pode ferir uma pessoa, mas nunca pode penetrar nos valores da democracia."

O problema, contudo, é que num pequeno país, uma bala pode fazer precisamente isso. Especialmente quando visa as duas únicas figuras em Timor-Leste com alguma esperança de trazer estabilidade duradoura.

Paul Toohey cobriu o período após a tentativa de assassínio em Timor-Leste.

Anónimo disse...

Come on, Mr. Tooey! have you been bought by XG and RH. How arrogant and ignorant of you to say that RH and XG are the only 2 figures in East Timor who could bring some stability in East Timor? Are you telling us that we the so many Timorese men and women are incapable of running our own Country? What do you say about the instability and the crisis flared up in 2006 which required Foreign troops to maintain order not to mention Law? You must be dreaming. perhaps RH and XG promised you something in return for your good words. Go home. East Timor doesn't need bias people like you. You should be ashamed because in your country people put down governments when they're dishonest and incompetent. But in East Timor you think people desrve the worst?!

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.