sábado, março 01, 2008

East Timorese government steps up repression in aftermath of alleged “coup attempt”

WSWS

By Patrick O’Connor
1 March 2008

East Timorese Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao has seized upon the crisis sparked by the February 11 wounding of President Jose Ramos-Horta and killing of former major Alfredo Reinado to enforce a number of repressive measures aimed at consolidating his unstable government. A spokesperson for Gusmao’s government announced on Monday that the “state of siege”—which involves a 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew and a ban on demonstrations and unauthorised meetings—has been extended to March 23. More than 200 people have already been arrested, mostly for violating the curfew, although opposition parliamentarians and journalists have also been targeted.

The Gusmao government’s rush to utilise authoritarian forms of rule raises yet again the many outstanding questions concerning the events surrounding Reinado’s killing. According to the official version promoted by the government and the Australian and international press, the rebel soldier was shot dead after he and his men attempted to either kill or kidnap both President Ramos-Horta and Prime Minister Gusmao as part of a failed coup attempt. This account represents the least likely explanation for what took place on February 11.

While details remain murky, what is known points to the possibility that Reinado was set up for assassination. The rebel soldier had earlier threatened to publicly release details of Gusmao’s alleged role in directly instigating a mutiny of soldiers (the “petitioners”) in 2006. The mutiny sparked a political crisis that culminated in the intervention of hundreds of Australian troops and the ousting of the former Fretilin government. Reinado’s allegation was issued via a DVD that was widely circulated in January throughout East Timor.

The old adage, cui bono (to whose benefit?), remains a standard rule in criminal investigations. In light of what has transpired over the past fortnight, the undisputed primary beneficiaries of Reinado’s death have been the Australian-led foreign military forces stationed in East Timor and Gusmao himself.

The prime minister’s adoption of dictatorial-style powers has been met with sharp criticism within the country’s parliament. A number of Fretilin parliamentarians opposed the extension of the “state of siege” on the grounds that the constitutional requirement for a “serious disturbance or threat of serious disturbance to the democratic constitutional order” no longer existed. During the debate, opposition even emerged from within Gusmao’s CNRT party. “I and my friends are really disappointed with the implementation of the ‘State of Emergency,’” CNRT parliamentarian Cecilio Caminha declared. “In the ‘State of Emergency’ there are no rules that permit the security apparatus to attack civilian houses at night, and to forbid people from holding meetings and demonstrations.”

Fretilin has accused Gusmao of using the crisis to undermine its position. On February 19, the party’s parliamentarian and media spokesman Jose Teixeira was detained in Dili after six car loads of armed Timorese police allegedly took him from his home. Teixeira later claimed that police had no arrest warrant and acted without the knowledge of the senior police investigating officer. He was released the next day after Mari Alkatiri, Fretilin’s general secretary and former Timorese prime minister, lodged a complaint. “This is political persecution—Teixeira is an effective media spokesman and someone in authority wants to shut him up,” he declared. “It is a disgraceful attempt to politicise the police force and use the investigation into the shooting of the president for party-political gain.”

Both Timorese police and Australian soldiers have also targeted journalists.

On February 23, the East Timor Post’s senior layout editor, Agustinho Ta Pasea, was arrested while en route to the Dili printing presses with a computer file of the newspaper’s weekend edition. Post editor Mouzinho De Araujo told the Australian that Ta Pasea was stopped at 2 a.m., beaten by military police and then taken to a police station where he was assaulted again. De Araujo said his staff member was held for 11 hours on the grounds that he had violated the curfew, before being released with cuts and bruises on his face. “Maybe, it is because our newspaper has been tough on [the] authorities,” the editor said. Ta Pasea’s detention delayed the publication of that day’s Post edition. The Secretariat of State Security later issued a formal apology for the police officers’ use of what it described as “unjustified force”.

The incident came a few days after Time reporter Rory Callinan and photographer John Wilson were detained by Australian troops for three hours at gunpoint outside of Dili as they were attempting to reach the village of Dare. The Australian-dominated International Stabilisation Force (ISF) was conducting an operation in the area, supposedly in pursuit of Reinado’s followers allegedly involved in Ramos-Horta’s shooting. Journalists were refused entry through an ISF roadblock and were told they were barred from the “media free area”. Callinan and Wilson then walked for an hour through a jungle trail to try to access Dare by foot.

Callinan later told the Australian that when they neared the village: “Two Australians jumped out of the bushes wearing ‘camo’ paint, pointing their guns, ordering us to get down. We were told to hand over our mobile phones, all our camera equipment and passports and told to sit without talking. The guy said: ‘We’re detaining you for your own safety and I can’t tell you more.’ I said, ‘So we can’t move?’ He said, ‘I’m telling you, I am detaining you. I can physically detain you if I want, but I choose not to at this point.’ We were wondering why they were letting dozens of East Timorese wander about with no apparent concern for their safety.”

The two men were held in the jungle for three hours, until sundown, when they were told they would be allowed into Dare. After they later walked back to Dili they were held again for breaching curfew. “They confiscated our gear again,” Callinan said. “We said, ‘But you’ve already detained us for three hours, which is why we are in breach of the curfew....’ The East Timorese with us were saying this was the sort of thing that happened under Indonesian times.”

The incident underscores the neo-colonial character of the Australian occupation of “independent” East Timor. Utilising the political crisis for its own ends, the Rudd Labor government has bolstered the size of the intervention force and declared that Australian forces will remain “for as long as they are required.” As with the previous deployments in 1999 and 2006, the latest operation is above all driven by Canberra’s determination to maintain its domination over the strategically significant and oil-rich territory, and to shut out rival powers such as China and Portugal. Rudd and Gusmao appear to have reached a mutually beneficial arrangement in which the Timorese leader gives the Australian military a free hand, in return for the Australian government’s continued political backing. Rudd and his ministers have maintained a strict silence in relation to the Gusmao government’s recent authoritarian measures.

The ISF’s actions in Dare also raise the question as to what Australian troops were doing, that they did not want the media to monitor. The status of the Australian military’s supposed pursuit of Reinado’s wanted men remains unclear. More than 1,100 Australian troops, including at least 80 elite SAS personnel, are now on the ground in East Timor or stationed on naval warships offshore. Gusmao has reportedly authorised these forces to use lethal force. Yet despite the Australian military’s vast array of surveillance technology and extensive knowledge of Reinado’s group, amassed over the last two years, the occupying troops have apparently been unable to track down any of the alleged would-be assassins of Ramos-Horta.

Was Gusmao’s government facing dissolution?

Events since February 11 make clear just how convenient Reinado’s death was for both Gusmao and Canberra.

The former major’s accusation that the prime minister had deliberately instigated the petitioner’s protests in 2006 was seriously undermining Gusmao’s already unstable three-party coalition government. Just as Reinado’s accusations were circulating throughout East Timor, the government passed its first budget, slashing food rations for the 100,000 internally displaced refugees and cutting pensions. At the same time, the government boasted that it was lowering corporate and investment taxes to among the lowest levels in the world.

These measures, which will further increase social inequality in the deeply impoverished country, drew widespread opposition from ordinary Timorese and inflamed tensions and infighting within the government. Rumours spread in Dili that Fernando “La Sama” de Araujo, leader of the Democratic Party and now acting president, would withdraw from the coalition.

Gusmao meanwhile was refusing to deny Reinado’s allegations and threatened to arrest those journalists pursuing the story. Alkatiri demanded that Gusmao resign and that fresh elections be called.

There is evidence indicating that President Ramos-Horta was preparing to publicly endorse such demands. According to the Timor News Line web site, which translates Timorese media reports into English, on February 11 (the same day Reinado was killed) the Diario Nacional reported that: “Fretilin Secretary General, Mari Alkatiri, said President Jose Ramos Horta and the UN Secretary General have agreed with Fretilin’s proposal of holding another election in the country”.

The latest issue of the Indonesian Tempo magazine features an interview with Alkatiri in which the former prime minister claims there was a connection between the events of February 11 and a meeting allegedly convened by President Ramos-Horta a week earlier.

“There was a meeting of politicians at Horta’s residence a week before the shootings,” Alkatiri said. “Attending the meeting were members of the Timorese Reconstruction National Party (CNRT) led by Xanana Gusmao, the Social Democrat Party, the Timor Social Democrat Party Association (ASDT) and the Fretilin Party ... President Horta welcomed the proposal of the Fretilin Party to the UN Secretary-General. Essentially it united all parties under the Parliamentary Majority Alliance (AMP) with the Fretilin, and forming an inclusive government, a national unity government. Fretilin itself refused to join in the national unity government like this one. The initiative was taken to resolve the problem of Alfredo Reinado, deserters led by Salsinha Gastao and also the refugees.”

Asked if any of Timor’s “party elites” were involved in Reinado’s killing, Alkatiri refused to directly answer or mention Gusmao by name, but said, “I will just say that the person behind Horta’s shooting perhaps disagreed with the President’s initiative to form a new government and hold another election.”

If Alkatiri’s account is true, it places in fresh perspective the secret deal struck between Ramos-Horta and Reinado just four weeks before the rebel soldier was killed. On January 13, the two men brokered a deal whereby Reinado would first submit to house arrest and then soon after be amnestied by Ramos-Horta. Could it be that the president, formerly a close ally of Gusmao, regarded the break-down in relations between Reinado and the prime minister as an intolerable threat to the agreement he had just brokered, which required the formation of a new coalition administration between Fretilin, the ASDT, and elements of the CNRT?

If so, the official version of Reinado’s killing becomes even more implausible. The former major would have been attempting to assassinate or kidnap Ramos-Horta, who had not only guaranteed his freedom, but was also preparing to lend his weight to the ousting of Gusmao, whom Reinado was accusing of being a criminal and a traitor. On the other hand, if the scenario suggested by Alkatiri’s statements is true, Gusmao would have had an even more powerful motive to eliminate Reinado, and trigger a political crisis through which he could extend his authority.

The possibility of such a conspiracy raises immediate questions regarding the Australian government’s role. There is little possibility that Australian authorities—which include highly placed government and military advisors as well as an extensive network of intelligence agents and informants—would have been ignorant of the various political ructions in Dili. The prospect of a return to a Fretilin-led government would have sounded alarm bells. The former Howard government, with the unstinting support of its Labor opposition, as well as the entire Australian press, expended considerable resources ousting the Alkatiri administration in 2006. Its protracted “regime change” campaign was driven by concern that the Fretilin government was too oriented towards rival powers and was unwilling to accede to all of Australia’s demands for possession of swathes of the Timor Sea’s oil and gas reserves. Gusmao’s recent moves—both in the lead up to the events of February 11 and since—were no doubt known, if not directly instigated, by Canberra.

None of these issues has been canvassed in the Australian press. Not a single outlet has even reported Alkatiri’s statements in Tempo. To the extent that any political assessment has been attempted of the events surrounding the shootings outside Ramos-Horta’s residence, Reinado’s potential motivations are simply put down to insanity, thereby excusing the logical implausibility of the official version. The media’s performance is consistent with its role in 1999 and 2006, when it functioned as the primary promoter of the Howard government’s military operations, under the banner of “humanitarian intervention” and “democracy”.

World Socialist Web Site



TRADUÇÃO:

Governo Timorense aumenta repressão depois de alegada “tentativa de golpe”

WSWS

Por Patrick O’Connor
1 Março 2008

O Primeiro-Ministro Timorense Xanana Gusmão aproveitou a crise desencadeada pelos ferimentos infligidos em 11 de Fevereiro ao Presidente José Ramos-Horta e morte do antigo major Alfredo Reinado para tomar uma série de medidas repressivas que visam consolidar o seu instável governo. Como anunciou um porta-voz do governo de Gusmão na Segunda-feira “o estado de sítio”— que envolve um recolher obrigatório das 10 p.m. até às 6 a.m. E a proibição de manifestações e reunião não autorizadas — foi prolongado até 23 de Março. Mais de 200 pessoas já foram detidas a maioria por violação do recolher obrigatório, apesar de terem tido também visados deputados da oposição e jornalistas.

A pressa do governo de Gusmão em usar métodos autoritários de governar levanta contudo outra vez muitas questões importantes acerca dos eventos que rodearam a morte de Reinado. De acordo com a versão oficial promovida pelo governo e pelos media Australianos e internacionais, o soldado amotinado foi morto a tiro depois dele e dos seus homens terem tentado ou matar ou raptar ambos o Presidente Ramos-Horta e Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão como parte duma tentativa de golpe falhada. Esta explicação representa a menos provável de todas as explicações do que ocorreu em 11 de Fevereiro.

Ao mesmo tempo que os detalhes permanecem nebulosos, o que se sabe aponta para a possibilidade duma cilada para assassinar Reinado. Antes o soldado amotinado tinha ameaçado publicamente emitir detalhes ao alegado papel de Gusmão em instigar directamente um motim de soldados (os “peticionários”) em 2006. O motim desencadeou uma crise política que culminou na intervenção de centenas de tropas Australianas e na remoção do antigo governo da Fretilin. A alegação de Reinado foi emitida num DVD que circulou alargadamente em Janeiro através de Timor-Leste.

O velho adágio, cui bono (quem ganha?), continua a ser uma regra normal nas investigações criminais. À luz do que transpirou na quinzena passada, os principais ganhadores indiscutíveis da morte de Reinado têm sido as forças estrangeiras lideradas pelos Australianos estacionadas em Timor-Leste e o próprio Gusmão.

A adopção pelo primeiro-ministro de poderes de tipo ditatorial foi recebida com críticas agudas no parlamento do país. Uma sédir de deputados da Fretilin opuseram-se ao prolongamento do “estado de sítio” com base de que já não existia a exigência constitucional para “perturbações sérias ou ameaça de perturbações sérias à ordem democrática constitucional”. Durante o debate, a oposição chegou mesmo a emergir dentro do partido de Gusmão, o CNRT. “Eu e os meus amigos estamos descontentes com a implementação do ‘Estado de Emergência,’” O deputado do CNRT Cecilio Caminha declarou. “No 'Estado de Emergência' não há regras que autorizem o aparelho de segurança a atacar casas de civis à noite ou a proibir as pessoas de fazerem reuniões e manifestações.”

A Fretilin tem acusado Gusmão de usar a crise para minar a sua posição. Em 19 de Fevereiro, o deputado do partido e seu porta-voz para os media José Teixeira foi detido em Dili depois de seis carros cheios de polícias Timorenses armados o levarem da sua casa. Depois Teixeira afirmou que a polícia não tinha mandato de prisão e que tinha actuado sem conhecimento do oficial de topo da polícia de investigação. Ele foi libertado no dia a seguir depois de Mari Alkatiri, o secretário-geral da Fretilin e antigo primeiro-ministro Timorense ter apresentado queixa. “Isto é perseguição política — Teixeira é um porta-voz para os media eficaz e alguém em posição de autoridade quer calá-lo ,” declarou. “É uma tentativa desgraçada para politizar a força da polícia e usar a investigação ao balear do presidente para ganhos político-partidários .”

Tanto os polícias Timorenses como os soldados Australianos têm também alvejado jornalistas.

Em 23 de Fevereiro, o editor gráfico de topo do Timor Post, Agostinho Ta Pasea, foi preso quando ia para a tipografia em Dili com o ficheiro informático da edição de fim-de-semana do jornal. O editor do Post Mouzinho De Araujo disse ao The Australian que Ta Pasea foi parado às t 2 a.m., agredido pela polícia militar e depois levado para uma estação de polícia onde tornou a ser agredido. De Araujo disse que o membro do seu pessoal ficor retido 11 horas com o pretexto de ter violado o recolher obrigatório, antes de ser libertado com golpes e contusões na cara. “Talvez tenha acontecido isto porque o nosso jornal tem sido duro com as autoridades,” disse o editor. A detenção de Ta Pasea fez atrasar a publicação desse dia do Post. A Secretaria de Estado da Segurança emitiu mais tarde um pedido de desculpa formal pelo uso pelos oficiais da polícia do que descreveu como “força injustificada”.

O incidente ocorreu poucos dias depois do reórter daTime Rory Callinan ae do fotógrafo John Wilson terem sido detidos por tropas Australianas durante três horas com armas apontadas fora de Dili quando tentavam alcançar a vila de Dare. A ISF dominada pelos Australianos estava a conduzir uma operação na área, supostamente em perseguição de seguidores de Reinado envolvidos nos tiros contra Ramos-Horta. Aos jornalistas foi recusada a entrada através dum posto de controlo de estrada da ISF e foi-lhes dito que estavam proibidos de entrar na “área proibida aos media”. Callinan e Wilson caminharam então através duma pista no mato para tentarem o acesso a Dare a pé.

Mais tarde Callinan disse ao The Australian que quando se aproximavam da vila: “Saltaram do mato dois Australianos usando tinta de “camuflagem”, de armas apontadas e ordenaram para nos deitarmos no chão. Disseram-nos para entregar os nossos telemóveis, todo o nosso equipamento de câmara e os passaportes e que nos sentássemos sem falar. O tipo disse: ‘Estamos a deter vocês para a vossa segurança e não vos posso dizer mais .’ Disse, ‘Então não nos podemos mover?’ Ele disse, ‘Estou a dizer-lhes, estou a deter vocês. Posso deter vocês fisicamente, se quiser, mas escolhi não o fazer nesta altura.’ Perguntava-mos a nós próprios porque é que deixavam circular por ali dúzias de Timorenses sem preocupação aparente com a segurança deles.”

Os dois homens ficaram retidos no mato durante três horas, até ao pôr do sol, quando lhes disseram que podiam prosseguir para Dare. Depois de mais tarde terem regressado a Dili foram outra vez detidos por terem violado o recolher obrigatório,” disse Callinan. “Dissemos, ‘Mas já nos detiveram durante três horas e foi por causa disso que violámos o recolher obrigatório....’ Os Timorenses que estavam connosco repetiam que istoe era o tipo de coisas que aconteciam no tempo dos Indonésios.”

O incidente sublinha o carácter neo-colonial da ocupação Australiana do Timor-Leste “independente”. Ao usar a crise política para os seus próprios fins, o governo do Labor de Rudd Labor aumentou o tamanho da força de intervenção e declarou que as forças Australianas ficarão “o tempo que for pedido.” Como os destacamentos anteriores em 1999 e 2006, a última operação é acima de tudo movida pela determinação de Canberra em manter a sua dominação sobre o território rico em petróleo e estrategicamente significativo, e afastar poderes rivais como a China e Portugal. Rudd e Gusmão parece terem alcançado um arranjo mutuamente benéfico pelo qual p líder Timorense dá carta livre aos militares Australianos e como paga o governo Australiano continua a suportá-lo politicamente. Rudd e os seus ministros têm mantido um silêncio rigoroso em relação às recentes medidas autoritárias do governo de Gusmão.

As acções da ISF em Dare levantam também questões sobre o que é que as tropas Australianas andavam a fazer, que não queriam que os media monitorizassem. O estatuto da suposta perseguição dos homens de Reinado pelos militares Australianos mantém-se por esclarecer. Mais de 1,100 tropas Australianas, incluindo pelo menos 80 elementos das SAS tropas de elite estão agora no terreno em Timor-Leste ou estacionados em navios de guerra offshore. Gusmão segundo relatos, autorizou essas forças a usarem força letal. Contudo apesar do vasto sortido de tecnologia de vigilância e do conhecimento extensivo do grupo de Reinado dos militares Australianos, recolhidos durante os dois últimos anos, aparentemente as tropas ocupantes foram incapazes de localizar qualquer um dos alegados candidatos a assassinos de Ramos-Horta.

Estava o governo de Gusmão a enfrentar a dissolução?

Desde o 11 de Fevereiro os eventos tornam claro como foi conveniente a morte de Reinado para ambos Gusmão e Canberra.

A acusação do antigo major que o primeiro-ministro tinha instigado deliberadamente o protesto dos peticionários em 2006 estava a minar seriamente o já instável governo de coligação de três partidos. Na altura em que as acusações de Reinado estavam a circular através do país, o governo aprovou o seu primeiro orçamento, reduzindo as rações de comida dos 100,000 deslocados para metade e cortando nas pensões. Ao mesmo tempo, o governo gabava-se que estava a baixar os impostos para companhias e investimento para os níveis mais baixos do mundo.

Estas medidas, que aumentarão ainda mais a desigualdade social no país profundamente empobrecido, atraíram alargada oposição dos cidadãos Timorenses comuns e inflamou tensões e lutas dentro do governo. Correram rumores em Dili que Fernando “La Sama” de Araújo, líder do Partido Democrático e agora presidente interino se retiraria da coligação.

Entretanto Gusmão recusava-se a negar as alegações de Reinado e ameaçava prender os jornalistas que insistissem na história. Alkatiri pediu a resignação de Gusmão e que se realizassem eleições antecipadas.

Há evidência que o Presidente Ramos-Horta se estava a preparar para endossar publicamente tais pedidos. De acordo com o Timor News Line web site, que traduz relatos dos media Timorenses para Inglês, em 11 de Fevereiro (o mesmo dia em que Reinado foi morto) o Diario Nacional relatou que : “O Secretário-Geral da Fretilin, Mari Alkatiri, disse que o Presidente José Ramos Horta e o Secretário-Geral da ONU tinham concordado com a proposta da Fretilin de realizar eleições antecipadas no país”.

A última edição da revista Indonésia Tempo traz uma entrevista com Alkatiri na qual o antigo primeiro-ministro afirma que há uma conexão entre os eventos de 11 de Fevereiro e um encontro alegadamente convocado pelo Presidente Ramos-Horta uma semana antes.

“Houve um encontro de políticos na residência de Horta uma semana antes dos tiros,” disse Alkatiri. “Nesse encontro participaram membros do CNRT liderado por Xanana Gusmão, PSD, ASDT e da Fretilin ...O Presidente Horta deu as boas vindas à proposta da Fretilin Party ao Secretário-Geral da ONU. Essencialmente essa proposta unia todos os partidos da AMP com a Fretilin, na formação dum governo inclusivo, um governo de unidade nacional. A própria Fretilin recusou-se a juntar no governo de unidade nacional como este. A iniciativa era tomada para resolver o problema de Alfredo Reinado, desertores liderados por Salsinha Gasão e também os deslocados.”

Perguntado se algum dos “partidos de elites” de Timor esteve envolvido na morte de Reinado, Alkatiri recusou-se a responder directamente ou a mencionar o nome de Gusmão, mas disse, “Direi apenas que a pessoa por detrás dos tiros contra Horta talvez discordasse da iniciativa do Presidente para formar um novo governo e fazer eleições antecipadas.”

Se a explicação de Alkatiri for verdadeira, põe numa nova perspectiva o acordo feito entre Ramos-Horta e Reinado apenas quatro semanas antes do soldado amotinado ter sido morto. Em 11 de Janeiro, tos dois homens tinham acordado que Reinado se entregaria primeiro a prisão domiciliária que pouco depois seria amnistiado por Ramos-Horta. Será que o presidente, antes um aliado próximo de Gusmão, viu a ruptura de relações entre Reinado e o primeiro-ministro como uma ameaça intolerável ao acordo que tinha acabado de fazer, que requeria a formação duma nova administração de coligação entre a Fretilin, ASDT, e elementos do CNRT?

Se sim, a versão oficial da morte de Reinado torna-se ainda mais implausivel. O antigo major teria tentado assassinar ou raptar Ramos-Horta,que tinha não apenas garantido a sua liberdade, como estava também a preparar-se a emprestar o seu peso para a saída de Gusmão, a quem Reinado estava a acusar ser um criminoso e em traidor. Por outro lado, se for verdadeiro o cenário sugerido pelas declarações de Alkatiri, Gusmão teria um motivo ainda mais poderoso para eliminar Reinado, e desencadear uma crise política através da qual pudesse prolongar a sua autoridade.

A possibilidade duma tal conspiração levanta questões imediatas sobre o papel do governo Australiano. Há pouca possibilidade de as autoridades Australianas — que incluem conselheiros militares e em altos cargos no governo bem como uma rede alargada de informadores e agentes dos serviços de informações — estarem na ignorância das variadas acções em Dili. A perspectiva do regresso dum governo liderado pela Fretilin teria feito tocar sinos de alarme. O antigo governo Howard, com o apoio não regateado da oposição Labor, bem como de toda a imprensa Australiana, gastou recursos consideráveis para expulsar a administração Alkatiri em 2006. A sua prolongada campanha para a “mudança de regime” foi conduzida pela preocupação do governo da Fretilin se orientar demasiado para poderes rivais e não querer aceder a todos os pedidos da Austrália para a posse das reservas do petróleo e gás do Mar de Timor. As movimentações recentes de Gusmão —ambos dos eventos de 11 de Fevereiro e desde então — eram sem dúvida conhecidas, se não directamente instigadas por Canberra.

Nenhuma destas questões tem sido debatida na imprensa Australiana. Nem uma única publicação sequer relatou as declarações de Alkatiri no Tempo. Chegou-se ao ponto de qualquer análise política que se tente fazer aos eventos que rodearam o tiroteio no exterior da residência de Ramos-Horta, e das motivações potenciais de Reinado ser simplesmente considerada loucura, assim justificando a lógica implausível da versão oficial. A actuação dos media é consistente com o seu papel em 1999 e 2006, quando foi então o promotor principal das operações militares do governo de Howard, sob a bandeira de “intervenção humanitária” e “democracia”.

World Socialist Web Site

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Governo Timorense aumenta repressão depois de alegada “tentativa de golpe”
WSWS

Por Patrick O’Connor
1 Março 2008

O Primeiro-Ministro Timorense Xanana Gusmão aproveitou a crise desencadeada pelos ferimentos infligidos em 11 de Fevereiro ao Presidente José Ramos-Horta e morte do antigo major Alfredo Reinado para tomar uma série de medidas repressivas que visam consolidar o seu instável governo. Como anunciou um porta-voz do governo de Gusmão na Segunda-feira “o estado de sítio”— que envolve um recolher obrigatório das 10 p.m. até às 6 a.m. E a proibição de manifestações e reunião não autorizadas — foi prolongado até 23 de Março. Mais de 200 pessoas já foram detidas a maioria por violação do recolher obrigatório, apesar de terem tido também visados deputados da oposição e jornalistas.

A pressa do governo de Gusmão em usar métodos autoritários de governar levanta contudo outra vez muitas questões importantes acerca dos eventos que rodearam a morte de Reinado. De acordo com a versão oficial promovida pelo governo e pelos media Australianos e internacionais, o soldado amotinado foi morto a tiro depois dele e dos seus homens terem tentado ou matar ou raptar ambos o Presidente Ramos-Horta e Primeiro-Ministro Gusmão como parte duma tentativa de golpe falhada. Esta explicação representa a menos provável de todas as explicações do que ocorreu em 11 de Fevereiro.

Ao mesmo tempo que os detalhes permanecem nebulosos, o que se sabe aponta para a possibilidade duma cilada para assassinar Reinado. Antes o soldado amotinado tinha ameaçado publicamente emitir detalhes ao alegado papel de Gusmão em instigar directamente um motim de soldados (os “peticionários”) em 2006. O motim desencadeou uma crise política que culminou na intervenção de centenas de tropas Australianas e na remoção do antigo governo da Fretilin. A alegação de Reinado foi emitida num DVD que circulou alargadamente em Janeiro através de Timor-Leste.

O velho adágio, cui bono (quem ganha?), continua a ser uma regra normal nas investigações criminais. À luz do que transpirou na quinzena passada, os principais ganhadores indiscutíveis da morte de Reinado têm sido as forças estrangeiras lideradas pelos Australianos estacionadas em Timor-Leste e o próprio Gusmão.

A adopção pelo primeiro-ministro de poderes de tipo ditatorial foi recebida com críticas agudas no parlamento do país. Uma sédir de deputados da Fretilin opuseram-se ao prolongamento do “estado de sítio” com base de que já não existia a exigência constitucional para “perturbações sérias ou ameaça de perturbações sérias à ordem democrática constitucional”. Durante o debate, a oposição chegou mesmo a emergir dentro do partido de Gusmão, o CNRT. “Eu e os meus amigos estamos descontentes com a implementação do ‘Estado de Emergência,’” O deputado do CNRT Cecilio Caminha declarou. “No 'Estado de Emergência' não há regras que autorizem o aparelho de segurança a atacar casas de civis à noite ou a proibir as pessoas de fazerem reuniões e manifestações.”

A Fretilin tem acusado Gusmão de usar a crise para minar a sua posição. Em 19 de Fevereiro, o deputado do partido e seu porta-voz para os media José Teixeira foi detido em Dili depois de seis carros cheios de polícias Timorenses armados o levarem da sua casa. Depois Teixeira afirmou que a polícia não tinha mandato de prisão e que tinha actuado sem conhecimento do oficial de topo da polícia de investigação. Ele foi libertado no dia a seguir depois de Mari Alkatiri, o secretário-geral da Fretilin e antigo primeiro-ministro Timorense ter apresentado queixa. “Isto é perseguição política — Teixeira é um porta-voz para os media eficaz e alguém em posição de autoridade quer calá-lo ,” declarou. “É uma tentativa desgraçada para politizar a força da polícia e usar a investigação ao balear do presidente para ganhos político-partidários .”

Tanto os polícias Timorenses como os soldados Australianos têm também alvejado jornalistas.

Em 23 de Fevereiro, o editor gráfico de topo do Timor Post, Agostinho Ta Pasea, foi preso quando ia para a tipografia em Dili com o ficheiro informático da edição de fim-de-semana do jornal. O editor do Post Mouzinho De Araujo disse ao The Australian que Ta Pasea foi parado às t 2 a.m., agredido pela polícia militar e depois levado para uma estação de polícia onde tornou a ser agredido. De Araujo disse que o membro do seu pessoal ficor retido 11 horas com o pretexto de ter violado o recolher obrigatório, antes de ser libertado com golpes e contusões na cara. “Talvez tenha acontecido isto porque o nosso jornal tem sido duro com as autoridades,” disse o editor. A detenção de Ta Pasea fez atrasar a publicação desse dia do Post. A Secretaria de Estado da Segurança emitiu mais tarde um pedido de desculpa formal pelo uso pelos oficiais da polícia do que descreveu como “força injustificada”.

O incidente ocorreu poucos dias depois do reórter daTime Rory Callinan ae do fotógrafo John Wilson terem sido detidos por tropas Australianas durante três horas com armas apontadas fora de Dili quando tentavam alcançar a vila de Dare. A ISF dominada pelos Australianos estava a conduzir uma operação na área, supostamente em perseguição de seguidores de Reinado envolvidos nos tiros contra Ramos-Horta. Aos jornalistas foi recusada a entrada através dum posto de controlo de estrada da ISF e foi-lhes dito que estavam proibidos de entrar na “área proibida aos media”. Callinan e Wilson caminharam então através duma pista no mato para tentarem o acesso a Dare a pé.

Mais tarde Callinan disse ao The Australian que quando se aproximavam da vila: “Saltaram do mato dois Australianos usando tinta de “camuflagem”, de armas apontadas e ordenaram para nos deitarmos no chão. Disseram-nos para entregar os nossos telemóveis, todo o nosso equipamento de câmara e os passaportes e que nos sentássemos sem falar. O tipo disse: ‘Estamos a deter vocês para a vossa segurança e não vos posso dizer mais .’ Disse, ‘Então não nos podemos mover?’ Ele disse, ‘Estou a dizer-lhes, estou a deter vocês. Posso deter vocês fisicamente, se quiser, mas escolhi não o fazer nesta altura.’ Perguntava-mos a nós próprios porque é que deixavam circular por ali dúzias de Timorenses sem preocupação aparente com a segurança deles.”

Os dois homens ficaram retidos no mato durante três horas, até ao pôr do sol, quando lhes disseram que podiam prosseguir para Dare. Depois de mais tarde terem regressado a Dili foram outra vez detidos por terem violado o recolher obrigatório,” disse Callinan. “Dissemos, ‘Mas já nos detiveram durante três horas e foi por causa disso que violámos o recolher obrigatório....’ Os Timorenses que estavam connosco repetiam que istoe era o tipo de coisas que aconteciam no tempo dos Indonésios.”

O incidente sublinha o carácter neo-colonial da ocupação Australiana do Timor-Leste “independente”. Ao usar a crise política para os seus próprios fins, o governo do Labor de Rudd Labor aumentou o tamanho da força de intervenção e declarou que as forças Australianas ficarão “o tempo que for pedido.” Como os destacamentos anteriores em 1999 e 2006, a última operação é acima de tudo movida pela determinação de Canberra em manter a sua dominação sobre o território rico em petróleo e estrategicamente significativo, e afastar poderes rivais como a China e Portugal. Rudd e Gusmão parece terem alcançado um arranjo mutuamente benéfico pelo qual p líder Timorense dá carta livre aos militares Australianos e como paga o governo Australiano continua a suportá-lo politicamente. Rudd e os seus ministros têm mantido um silêncio rigoroso em relação às recentes medidas autoritárias do governo de Gusmão.

As acções da ISF em Dare levantam também questões sobre o que é que as tropas Australianas andavam a fazer, que não queriam que os media monitorizassem. O estatuto da suposta perseguição dos homens de Reinado pelos militares Australianos mantém-se por esclarecer. Mais de 1,100 tropas Australianas, incluindo pelo menos 80 elementos das SAS tropas de elite estão agora no terreno em Timor-Leste ou estacionados em navios de guerra offshore. Gusmão segundo relatos, autorizou essas forças a usarem força letal. Contudo apesar do vasto sortido de tecnologia de vigilância e do conhecimento extensivo do grupo de Reinado dos militares Australianos, recolhidos durante os dois últimos anos, aparentemente as tropas ocupantes foram incapazes de localizar qualquer um dos alegados candidatos a assassinos de Ramos-Horta.

Estava o governo de Gusmão a enfrentar a dissolução?

Desde o 11 de Fevereiro os eventos tornam claro como foi conveniente a morte de Reinado para ambos Gusmão e Canberra.

A acusação do antigo major que o primeiro-ministro tinha instigado deliberadamente o protesto dos peticionários em 2006 estava a minar seriamente o já instável governo de coligação de três partidos. Na altura em que as acusações de Reinado estavam a circular através do país, o governo aprovou o seu primeiro orçamento, reduzindo as rações de comida dos 100,000 deslocados para metade e cortando nas pensões. Ao mesmo tempo, o governo gabava-se que estava a baixar os impostos para companhias e investimento para os níveis mais baixos do mundo.

Estas medidas, que aumentarão ainda mais a desigualdade social no país profundamente empobrecido, atraíram alargada oposição dos cidadãos Timorenses comuns e inflamou tensões e lutas dentro do governo. Correram rumores em Dili que Fernando “La Sama” de Araújo, líder do Partido Democrático e agora presidente interino se retiraria da coligação.

Entretanto Gusmão recusava-se a negar as alegações de Reinado e ameaçava prender os jornalistas que insistissem na história. Alkatiri pediu a resignação de Gusmão e que se realizassem eleições antecipadas.

Há evidência que o Presidente Ramos-Horta se estava a preparar para endossar publicamente tais pedidos. De acordo com o Timor News Line web site, que traduz relatos dos media Timorenses para Inglês, em 11 de Fevereiro (o mesmo dia em que Reinado foi morto) o Diario Nacional relatou que : “O Secretário-Geral da Fretilin, Mari Alkatiri, disse que o Presidente José Ramos Horta e o Secretário-Geral da ONU tinham concordado com a proposta da Fretilin de realizar eleições antecipadas no país”.

A última edição da revista Indonésia Tempo traz uma entrevista com Alkatiri na qual o antigo primeiro-ministro afirma que há uma conexão entre os eventos de 11 de Fevereiro e um encontro alegadamente convocado pelo Presidente Ramos-Horta uma semana antes.

“Houve um encontro de políticos na residência de Horta uma semana antes dos tiros,” disse Alkatiri. “Nesse encontro participaram membros do CNRT liderado por Xanana Gusmão, PSD, ASDT e da Fretilin ...O Presidente Horta deu as boas vindas à proposta da Fretilin Party ao Secretário-Geral da ONU. Essencialmente essa proposta unia todos os partidos da AMP com a Fretilin, na formação dum governo inclusivo, um governo de unidade nacional. A própria Fretilin recusou-se a juntar no governo de unidade nacional como este. A iniciativa era tomada para resolver o problema de Alfredo Reinado, desertores liderados por Salsinha Gasão e também os deslocados.”

Perguntado se algum dos “partidos de elites” de Timor esteve envolvido na morte de Reinado, Alkatiri recusou-se a responder directamente ou a mencionar o nome de Gusmão, mas disse, “Direi apenas que a pessoa por detrás dos tiros contra Horta talvez discordasse da iniciativa do Presidente para formar um novo governo e fazer eleições antecipadas.”

Se a explicação de Alkatiri for verdadeira, põe numa nova perspectiva o acordo feito entre Ramos-Horta e Reinado apenas quatro semanas antes do soldado amotinado ter sido morto. Em 11 de Janeiro, tos dois homens tinham acordado que Reinado se entregaria primeiro a prisão domiciliária que pouco depois seria amnistiado por Ramos-Horta. Será que o presidente, antes um aliado próximo de Gusmão, viu a ruptura de relações entre Reinado e o primeiro-ministro como uma ameaça intolerável ao acordo que tinha acabado de fazer, que requeria a formação duma nova administração de coligação entre a Fretilin, ASDT, e elementos do CNRT?

Se sim, a versão oficial da morte de Reinado torna-se ainda mais implausivel. O antigo major teria tentado assassinar ou raptar Ramos-Horta,que tinha não apenas garantido a sua liberdade, como estava também a preparar-se a emprestar o seu peso para a saída de Gusmão, a quem Reinado estava a acusar ser um criminoso e em traidor. Por outro lado, se for verdadeiro o cenário sugerido pelas declarações de Alkatiri, Gusmão teria um motivo ainda mais poderoso para eliminar Reinado, e desencadear uma crise política através da qual pudesse prolongar a sua autoridade.

A possibilidade duma tal conspiração levanta questões imediatas sobre o papel do governo Australiano. Há pouca possibilidade de as autoridades Australianas — que incluem conselheiros militares e em altos cargos no governo bem como uma rede alargada de informadores e agentes dos serviços de informações — estarem na ignorância das variadas acções em Dili. A perspectiva do regresso dum governo liderado pela Fretilin teria feito tocar sinos de alarme. O antigo governo Howard, com o apoio não regateado da oposição Labor, bem como de toda a imprensa Australiana, gastou recursos consideráveis para expulsar a administração Alkatiri em 2006. A sua prolongada campanha para a “mudança de regime” foi conduzida pela preocupação do governo da Fretilin se orientar demasiado para poderes rivais e não querer aceder a todos os pedidos da Austrália para a posse das reservas do petróleo e gás do Mar de Timor. As movimentações recentes de Gusmão —ambos dos eventos de 11 de Fevereiro e desde então — eram sem dúvida conhecidas, se não directamente instigadas por Canberra.

Nenhuma destas questões tem sido debatida na imprensa Australiana. Nem uma única publicação sequer relatou as declarações de Alkatiri no Tempo. Chegou-se ao ponto de qualquer análise política que se tente fazer aos eventos que rodearam o tiroteio no exterior da residência de Ramos-Horta, e das motivações potenciais de Reinado ser simplesmente considerada loucura, assim justificando a lógica implausível da versão oficial. A actuação dos media é consistente com o seu papel em 1999 e 2006, quando foi então o promotor principal das operações militares do governo de Howard, sob a bandeira de “intervenção humanitária” e “democracia”.

World Socialist Web Site

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.