quinta-feira, maio 15, 2008

Horta’s vision for East Timor

Scoop
Thursday, 15 May 2008, 12:35 pm
Article: Nina Hall
Horta’s vision for East Timor
By Nina Hall

President José Ramos Horta has been in the news for all the wrong reasons in the past few months after an attempt on his life that left him close to death. He has recently surfaced from a coma and from the problems his country faces. I spoke with the President late last year about Timor’s future. He acknowledged the many problems that Timor faced: from high rates of illiteracy, maternal mortality and a high proportion of young people to ongoing political instability – which led to the attempted assassination on the president and the prime minister, Xanana Gusmao.

But Horta is an optimist. Across the books piled high on his desk he outlined his positive visions for East Timor. He talked of Timorese taking initiatives to create a truly representative democracy.

Horta explained to me his proposal to establish a national youth parliament that would give the large cohort of young people legislative power. The parliament would be a permanent body that could pass binding legislation. Young people would be elected to represent their districts and there would be an 50/50 split of young women and men that meet several times a year when the national parliament was in recess. The youth parliament would have power to pass binding legislation and work in the 13 districts which make up East Timor.

Horta’s proposal would empower young people who played a crucial role in the resistance movement. In the 1990s those who went to study in Indonesia organised a student movement to educate their fellow Indonesians students and pressure the Indonesian government to change its policy on East Timor. Young people, predominantly men, are now flooding into Dili, the capital city of Timor, to look for work and education opportunities. Many study English to complement the national languages Tetun and Portuguese and the widely spoken Indonesian. Horta’s proposal for a youth parliament would give these young people a chance to directly shape their country’s future.

Since independence in 1999 Timorese women have also taken initatives to gain representation in national parliament and district councils. In 2001 they formed a national coalition of NGOs to lobby the UN for a quota to guarantee the inclusion of women in parliament. Although the UN rejected this proposal, Timorese women organised training for female candidates and got political leaders, including José Ramos Horta and Xanana Gusmao, to support women’s inclusion in politics. President Horta reccounted to me that in his visits to the districts, he often asks Timorese people ‘Would you vote for a woman to be president of this country?’. He found that ‘the vast majority 99 percent of the people I address, never see any problem with having a woman as the head of this country’.

The result can be seen in the election results: in 2001 women won 25 percent of the seats, and in 2007 they won 29.2 percent of the seats. Last year a woman, Lucia Lobato, also stood for President. This is remarkable feat for such a new country where traditionally women had no place in formal political institutions. In fact, Timor currently has the highest percentage of women in parliament of any country in South East Asia, outstripping Indonesia (11.6 %) Australia (26.7%) and ranks close to New Zealand (33.1%). In the first government the second most senior position: Minister for State Administration was held by a woman, Ana Pessoa.

Women are also gaining representation on traditional local village councils. In 2004 the Timorese government passed a law that guaranteed the election of three women on every Suco (village) council. Although positions on the suco councils were traditionally not open to women a quota of three women, including one young woman, changed this. Now there is even a case of a woman xefe de suco (village chief).

Outside of formal political institutions women have voiced the need to address domestic violence.

They have organised a national campaign and lobbied successsfully for domestic violence legislation. Through local NGOs, such as Fokupers, they have set up shelters for survivors of domestic violence. Horta has supported this movement by speaking out against domestic violence and supporting the annual 16 days campaign against gender-based violence - he even features on the 2007 campaign poster, standing with his arms held up in a cross.

What is significant is that these initiatives are largely Timorese driven. Since 1999 East Timor has been overrun with international NGOs, UN agencies and other international organisations. Their presence is hard to miss: every second car in Dili has a UN logo on it. These organisations bring much needed funds and expertise for development; however they also can also fuel dependency on international aid. In the long-term as a fully independent state, Timor needs to elaborate its own visions for creating a representative and equal democracy. These initiatives illustrate how it is beginning to do so.

Timor, like Horta, is on a rocky road to recovery. It still faces many critical issues: from the need to relocate thousands of internally displaced peoples currently camped in Dili, to ensuring a constant supply of electricity (when I was visiting there were daily power-cuts that lasted for hours).

The reality in Timor is complex: although the large majority of Timor’s 1.1 million people live in remote rural areas and survive off agriculture, the Timorese government last year were unable to spend all their budget. However, there are also positive signs of progress that should be acknowledged. Timorese, from the political elite to those in the districts, are outlining how they want their democracy to operate. Women are now increasingly represented on village councils and within the national parliament.

And in an international ground-breaking move, young people may also get their chance if Horta is able to recover and put in place the youth parliament.

ENDS

Tradução:

Visão de Horta para Timor-Leste

Scoop
Quinta-feira, 15 Maio 2008, 12:35 pm
Artigo: Nina Hall
Visão de Horta para Timor-Leste
Por Nina Hall

O Presidente José Ramos Horta tem andado nas notícias por todas as más razões nos últimos meses depois de um atentado contra a sua vida que o deixou perto da morte. Recentemente ele saiu dum coma e de problemas que o seu país enfrenta. falei com o Presidente no ano passado acerca do futuro de Timor. Ele reconheceu os muitos problemas que Timor enfrentava: desde altas taxas de analfabetismo, mortalidade materna e uma alta proporção de jovens na instabilidade política em curso – que levou à tentativa de assassinar o presidente e o primeiro-ministro, Xanana Gusmão.

Mas Horta é um optimista. Do outro lado da alta pinha de livros na sua secretária ele delineou as suas visões positivas para Timor-Leste. Ele falou de Timorenses que tomam iniciativas para criar uma democracia verdadeiramente representativa.

Horta explicou-me a sua proposta de estabelecer um parlamento nacional juvenil que daria a um grande bando de jovens poder legislativo. O parlamento seria um órgão permanente que aprovaria legislação obrigatória. Os jovens seriam eleitos para representar os seus distritos e haveria uma divisão 50/50 de rapazes e raparigas que se encontrariam várias vezes por ano quando o parlamento nacional estivesse de férias. O parlamento juvenil teria poder de aprovar legislação obrigatória e trabalharia nos 13 distritos que constituem Timor-Leste.

A proposta de Horta daria poder a jovens que tiveram um papel crucial no movimento da resistência. Nos anos 1990s os que foram estudar na Indonésia organizaram um movimento de estudantes para educar os seus colegas estudantes Indonésios e fazer pressão sobre o governo Indonésio para mudar a política sobre Timor-Leste. Jovens, predominantemente homens, estão agora a inundar Dili, a cidade capital de Timor, à procura de oportunidades de trabalho e educação. Muitos estudam Inglês para complementar as línguas nacionais Tétun e Português e o amplamente falado Indonésio. A proposta de Horta para um parlamento juvenil daria a esses jovens uma oportunidade para darem directamente a forma ao futuro do seu país.

Desde a independência em 1999 as mulheres Timorenses também tomaram iniciativas para ganharem representação no parlamento nacional e conselhos dos distritos. Em 2001 formaram uma coligação nacional de ONG's para pressionarem a ONU para uma cota para garantir a inclusão de mulheres no parlamento. Apesar da ONU ter rejeitado esta proposta, as mulheres Timorenses organizaram formação para candidatas e engajaram líderes políticos, incluindo José Ramos Horta e Xanana Gusmão, a apoiar a inclusão de mulheres na política. O Presidente Horta contou-me que nas suas visitas aos distritos, muitas vezes perguntava às pessoas Timorenses ‘Votaria numa mulher para ser presidente deste país?’. Descobriu que a ‘vasta maioria 99 por cento das pessoas a quem me dirigia, nunca viram qualquer problema em terem uma mulher à frente deste país’.

O resultado pode ser visto nos resultados das eleições: em 2001 as mulheres ganharam 25 por cento dos lugares e em 2007 ganharam 29.2 por cento dos lugares. No ano passado uma mulher, Lúcia Lobato, também concorreu para Presidente. Isto é um feito notável para um país tão novo onde tradicionalmente as mulheres não tinham lugar formal nas instituições políticas. De facto, Timor correntemente tem a percentagem de mulheres mais alta no parlamento que qualquer país no Sudeste Asiático, ultrapassando a Indonésia (11.6 %) Austrália (26.7%) e está próxima da Nova Zelândia (33.1%). No primeiro governo a segunda posição de topo: Ministro da Administração do Estado foi ocupada por uma mulher, Ana Pessoa.

As mulheres estão também a ganhar representação nos conselhos tradicionais locais de aldeia. Em 2004 o governo Timorense aprovou uma lei que garantia a eleição de três mulheres em cada conselho de Suco (aldeia). Apesar das posições nos conselhos de suco serem tradicionalmente não abertas às mulheres, a cota de três mulheres, incluindo uma rapariga, mudou isto. Agora há mesmo o caso duma mulher chefe de suco (chefe de aldeia).

Fora das instituições políticas formais as mulheres vocalizaram a necessidade de responder à violência doméstica.

Elas organizaram uma campanha nacional e pressionaram com sucesso por legislação sobre violência doméstica. Através de ONG's locais, como Fokupers, montaram abrigos para sobreviventes da violência doméstica. Horta tem apoiado este movimento falando contra a violência doméstica e apoiando a campanha anual de 16 dias contra violência com base no género – ele protagoniza mesmo um cartaz da campanha de 2007, em pé de braços cruzados.

O que é significativo é que estas iniciativas são largamente dirigidas por Timorenses. Desde 1999 Timor-Leste tem estado invadido com ONG's internacionais, agências da ONU e outras organizações internacionais. A sua presença é difícil de não ver: em cada dois carros em Dili um tem o logotipo da ONU. Estas organizações trazem fundos muito necessários e peritos para o desenvolvimento; contudo podem também alimentar a dependência da ajuda internacional. A longo prazo, como Estado totalmente independente, Timor precisa de elaborar as suas próprias visões para criar uma democracia representativa e igualitária. Estas iniciativas ilustram como é começar a fazer isso.

Timor, como Horta, está numa estrada pedregosa para a recuperação. Enfrenta ainda muitas questões graves: desde a necessidade de relocalizar milhares de deslocados correntemente acampados em Dili, a assegurar um fornecimento constante de electricidade (quando estava lá de visita havia cortes diários de electricidade que duravam horas).

A realidade em Timor é complexa: apesar da grande maioria do 1.1 milhão de pessoas de Timor viver em áreas rurais remotas e sobreviver da agricultura, o governo Timorense no ano passado foi incapaz de gastar todo o orçamento. Contudo, há também sinais positivos de progresso que devem ser reconhecidos. Os Timorenses, desde os da elite política até aos dos distritos estão a desenhar como querem operar a sua democracia. As mulheres estão crescentemente agora representadas nos conselhos de aldeia e dentro do parlamento nacional.

E num avanço internacional inovador, os jovens podem ter também a sua oportunidade se Horta conseguir recuperar e instituir o parlamento juvenil.

FIM

1 comentário:

Margarida disse...

Tradução:
Visão de Horta para Timor-Leste
Scoop
Quinta-feira, 15 Maio 2008, 12:35 pm
Artigo: Nina Hall
Visão de Horta para Timor-Leste
Por Nina Hall

O Presidente José Ramos Horta tem andado nas notícias por todas as más razões nos últimos meses depois de um atentado contra a sua vida que o deixou perto da morte. Recentemente ele saiu dum coma e de problemas que o seu país enfrenta. falei com o Presidente no ano passado acerca do futuro de Timor. Ele reconheceu os muitos problemas que Timor enfrentava: desde altas taxas de analfabetismo, mortalidade materna e uma alta proporção de jovens na instabilidade política em curso – que levou à tentativa de assassinar o presidente e o primeiro-ministro, Xanana Gusmão.

Mas Horta é um optimista. Do outro lado da alta pinha de livros na sua secretária ele delineou as suas visões positivas para Timor-Leste. Ele falou de Timorenses que tomam iniciativas para criar uma democracia verdadeiramente representativa.

Horta explicou-me a sua proposta de estabelecer um parlamento nacional juvenil que daria a um grande bando de jovens poder legislativo. O parlamento seria um órgão permanente que aprovaria legislação obrigatória. Os jovens seriam eleitos para representar os seus distritos e haveria uma divisão 50/50 de rapazes e raparigas que se encontrariam várias vezes por ano quando o parlamento nacional estivesse de férias. O parlamento juvenil teria poder de aprovar legislação obrigatória e trabalharia nos 13 distritos que constituem Timor-Leste.

A proposta de Horta daria poder a jovens que tiveram um papel crucial no movimento da resistência. Nos anos 1990s os que foram estudar na Indonésia organizaram um movimento de estudantes para educar os seus colegas estudantes Indonésios e fazer pressão sobre o governo Indonésio para mudar a política sobre Timor-Leste. Jovens, predominantemente homens, estão agora a inundar Dili, a cidade capital de Timor, à procura de oportunidades de trabalho e educação. Muitos estudam Inglês para complementar as línguas nacionais Tétun e Português e o amplamente falado Indonésio. A proposta de Horta para um parlamento juvenil daria a esses jovens uma oportunidade para darem directamente a forma ao futuro do seu país.

Desde a independência em 1999 as mulheres Timorenses também tomaram iniciativas para ganharem representação no parlamento nacional e conselhos dos distritos. Em 2001 formaram uma coligação nacional de ONG's para pressionarem a ONU para uma cota para garantir a inclusão de mulheres no parlamento. Apesar da ONU ter rejeitado esta proposta, as mulheres Timorenses organizaram formação para candidatas e engajaram líderes políticos, incluindo José Ramos Horta e Xanana Gusmão, a apoiar a inclusão de mulheres na política. O Presidente Horta contou-me que nas suas visitas aos distritos, muitas vezes perguntava às pessoas Timorenses ‘Votaria numa mulher para ser presidente deste país?’. Descobriu que a ‘vasta maioria 99 por cento das pessoas a quem me dirigia, nunca viram qualquer problema em terem uma mulher à frente deste país’.

O resultado pode ser visto nos resultados das eleições: em 2001 as mulheres ganharam 25 por cento dos lugares e em 2007 ganharam 29.2 por cento dos lugares. No ano passado uma mulher, Lúcia Lobato, também concorreu para Presidente. Isto é um feito notável para um país tão novo onde tradicionalmente as mulheres não tinham lugar formal nas instituições políticas. De facto, Timor correntemente tem a percentagem de mulheres mais alta no parlamento que qualquer país no Sudeste Asiático, ultrapassando a Indonésia (11.6 %) Austrália (26.7%) e está próxima da Nova Zelândia (33.1%). No primeiro governo a segunda posição de topo: Ministro da Administração do Estado foi ocupada por uma mulher, Ana Pessoa.

As mulheres estão também a ganhar representação nos conselhos tradicionais locais de aldeia. Em 2004 o governo Timorense aprovou uma lei que garantia a eleição de três mulheres em cada conselho de Suco (aldeia). Apesar das posições nos conselhos de suco serem tradicionalmente não abertas às mulheres, a cota de três mulheres, incluindo uma rapariga, mudou isto. Agora há mesmo o caso duma mulher chefe de suco (chefe de aldeia).

Fora das instituições políticas formais as mulheres vocalizaram a necessidade de responder à violência doméstica.

Elas organizaram uma campanha nacional e pressionaram com sucesso por legislação sobre violência doméstica. Através de ONG's locais, como Fokupers, montaram abrigos para sobreviventes da violência doméstica. Horta tem apoiado este movimento falando contra a violência doméstica e apoiando a campanha anual de 16 dias contra violência com base no género – ele protagoniza mesmo um cartaz da campanha de 2007, em pé de braços cruzados.

O que é significativo é que estas iniciativas são largamente dirigidas por Timorenses. Desde 1999 Timor-Leste tem estado invadido com ONG's internacionais, agências da ONU e outras organizações internacionais. A sua presença é difícil de não ver: em cada dois carros em Dili um tem o logotipo da ONU. Estas organizações trazem fundos muito necessários e peritos para o desenvolvimento; contudo podem também alimentar a dependência da ajuda internacional. A longo prazo, como Estado totalmente independente, Timor precisa de elaborar as suas próprias visões para criar uma democracia representativa e igualitária. Estas iniciativas ilustram como é começar a fazer isso.

Timor, como Horta, está numa estrada pedregosa para a recuperação. Enfrenta ainda muitas questões graves: desde a necessidade de relocalizar milhares de deslocados correntemente acampados em Dili, a assegurar um fornecimento constante de electricidade (quando estava lá de visita havia cortes diários de electricidade que duravam horas).

A realidade em Timor é complexa: apesar da grande maioria do 1.1 milhão de pessoas de Timor viver em áreas rurais remotas e sobreviver da agricultura, o governo Timorense no ano passado foi incapaz de gastar todo o orçamento. Contudo, há também sinais positivos de progresso que devem ser reconhecidos. Os Timorenses, desde os da elite política até aos dos distritos estão a desenhar como querem operar a sua democracia. As mulheres estão crescentemente agora representadas nos conselhos de aldeia e dentro do parlamento nacional.

E num avanço internacional inovador, os jovens podem ter também a sua oportunidade se Horta conseguir recuperar e instituir o parlamento juvenil.

FIM

Traduções

Todas as traduções de inglês para português (e também de francês para português) são feitas pela Margarida, que conhecemos recentemente, mas que desde sempre nos ajuda.

Obrigado pela solidariedade, Margarida!

Mensagem inicial - 16 de Maio de 2006

"Apesar de frágil, Timor-Leste é uma jovem democracia em que acreditamos. É o país que escolhemos para viver e trabalhar. Desde dia 28 de Abril muito se tem dito sobre a situação em Timor-Leste. Boatos, rumores, alertas, declarações de países estrangeiros, inocentes ou não, têm servido para transmitir um clima de conflito e insegurança que não corresponde ao que vivemos. Vamos tentar transmitir o que se passa aqui. Não o que ouvimos dizer... "
 

Malai Azul. Lives in East Timor/Dili, speaks Portuguese and English.
This is my blogchalk: Timor, Timor-Leste, East Timor, Dili, Portuguese, English, Malai Azul, politica, situação, Xanana, Ramos-Horta, Alkatiri, Conflito, Crise, ISF, GNR, UNPOL, UNMIT, ONU, UN.